suitable boiler and hot water tank combo for a 18 rads in house - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

suitable boiler and hot water tank combo for a 18 rads in house

£0.00 @
Hello folks Need some advice from some experienced plumbers. Anyone recommend some boilers and hot water tank combo for a house with 18 radiators and 3 bathrooms please. Need the boiler to … Read More
EN1GMA Avatar
8m, 1w agoPosted 8 months, 1 week ago
Hello folks

Need some advice from some experienced plumbers.

Anyone recommend some boilers and hot water tank combo for a house with 18 radiators and 3 bathrooms please.

Need the boiler to power the rads properly, not just make them lukewarm.

Going to be zoning the 4 floors into 2 zones so need some advice on how best to go about that to.

I'm asking because I want an idea of what needs to be done so I can explain to plumber who will do the job and know he's not fobbing me off.

For the plumbing of the whole house I've been quoted 2500 which includes copper pipes but obviously not boiler and tank.

Its a large house over 4 floors so I'm guessing that's a reasonable quote.

Repiping the whole house from scratch.

Any advice from the hukd community would be welcome.

Thanks.
Tags:
EN1GMA Avatar
8m, 1w agoPosted 8 months, 1 week ago
Options

All Responses

(11) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Sounds like a good quote so far. We paid £4300 for full copper pipe work, 12 stelrad radiators and combi boiler in a 3 bed, 2 bath house. Does your quote include radiators? I would expect your boiler to be around £1200 and an extra £300-£400 for the tank.
#2
Do you know the total value of BTUs from the radiators all together?
banned#3
bigweapon07
Do you know the total value of BTUs from the radiators all together?

yep. OP needs to use a btu calculator for each room that will give him the performance needed for each rad & then in turn the boiler power required.

And if its over 4 floors the best thing would probably be an unvented system so equal hot water pressure is delivered at each tap or shower.


(this thread seems so familiar) OP have you ever asked the same question on here before?


Edit. Yes you have. You will find the answers in you post from a few months ago.

Edited By: YouDontWantToKnow on Oct 18, 2016 02:34: c
#4
Use the whole house boiler sizing method to find the boiler size. I would go with a 300l unvented cylinder combined with an Intergas system boiler (probably 30kW). This assumes you have the correct pressure and flow rates. Whatever you do don't oversize the boiler.

Use Honeywell controls and zone valves. You could look at the Evohome if you want to get posh (and expensive).

Instead of assuming your installer is a numpty, or trying to fob you off, why not find one who knows what's he's talking about. For a 5-10K job I would want the installer to be taking some initiative.
#5
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size
#6
kash2013
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size

so how much are these boilers £ wise? You've got 14 rads and i'll be having 18 so not much of a difference. does your boiler heat up the rads properly and not just luke warm. personally, I don't see the point of having all the rads when the heat output will be minimal.

that's another reason why I want zones, to be able to control the temp in the right places depending on where we are in the house(upstairs/downstairs) and also trying to control cost by not switching everything on.

how much did the plumbing cost you?
#7
EN1GMA
kash2013
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size
so how much are these boilers £ wise? You've got 14 rads and i'll be having 18 so not much of a difference. does your boiler heat up the rads properly and not just luke warm. personally, I don't see the point of having all the rads when the heat output will be minimal.
that's another reason why I want zones, to be able to control the temp in the right places depending on where we are in the house(upstairs/downstairs) and also trying to control cost by not switching everything on.
how much did the plumbing cost you?
I used a vailiant 438 which is a regular boiler and 38kw. Its a excellent boiler which I brought used of eBay for £300 pounds. I went for a regular boiler so I could choose the pump and are a lot more reliable. I had it 5 years and the the person before had it 4 years. Its never ever given me any problems. I also brought a new glow worm 300l unvented tank of eBay for £300 to go with it. It didn't cost me much as I am a plumber/ electrician by trade plus various other things. If u buy a new vailiant 37kw there around £1300 +. All the rads are nice and warm and the boiler never has struggled. I also split my system into 2. Upstairs and downstairs bringing the pipes back to the boiler the increasing the size of piping from the boiler to the different zones. If u even the amount of rads and on the pipework then u won't have a problem with lukewarm rads. If u try and put 18 rads on a single branch of 22mm pipework then u definitely looking for issues. Like I explained 28mm pipework from the boiler to the zone valves then 22mm after this and you will be fine. You can go with system boiler like a 637 vailiant but u will need additional pumps after the zone valves. Or if u go for a 46kw commercial vailiant boiler then it has a larger pump built in and no additional pump will be required. But the price will be around £2500.
Also consider with less rads on at anytime make it easier for the boiler and the pump to warm the rads that are open.
Speak to you plumber and see what reply he gives u. You will then know if he understands a larger system. I seen to many big houses with a large boilers but 22mm pipework feeding 15 rads and rads at the end of the runs stone cold or lukewarm. Its all about reducing pipe drops. Realising that heat likes to rise. And finally correct size pipework. Do this and u can't really go wrong.

Edited By: kash2013 on Oct 21, 2016 20:39
#8
kash2013
EN1GMA
kash2013
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size
so how much are these boilers £ wise? You've got 14 rads and i'll be having 18 so not much of a difference. does your boiler heat up the rads properly and not just luke warm. personally, I don't see the point of having all the rads when the heat output will be minimal.
that's another reason why I want zones, to be able to control the temp in the right places depending on where we are in the house(upstairs/downstairs) and also trying to control cost by not switching everything on.
how much did the plumbing cost you?
I used a vailiant 438 which is a regular boiler and 38kw. Its a excellent boiler which I brought used of eBay for £300 pounds. I went for a regular boiler so I could choose the pump and are a lot more reliable. I had it 5 years and the the person before had it 4 years. Its never ever given me any problems. I also brought a new glow worm 300l unvented tank of eBay for £300 to go with it. It didn't cost me much as I am a plumber/ electrician by trade plus various other things. If u buy a new vailiant 37kw there around £1300 +. All the rads are nice and warm and the boiler never has struggled. I also split my system into 2. Upstairs and downstairs bringing the pipes back to the boiler the increasing the size of piping from the boiler to the different zones. If u even the amount of rads and on the pipework then u won't have a problem with lukewarm rads. If u try and put 18 rads on a single branch of 22mm pipework then u definitely looking for issues. Like I explained 28mm pipework from the boiler to the zone valves then 22mm after this and you will be fine. You can go with system boiler like a 637 vailiant but u will need additional pumps after the zone valves. Or if u go for a 46kw commercial vailiant boiler then it has a larger pump built in and no additional pump will be required. But the price will be around £2500.
Also consider with less rads on at anytime make it easier for the boiler and the pump to warm the rads that are open.
Speak to you plumber and see what reply he gives u. You will then know if he understands a larger system. I seen to many big houses with a large boilers but 22mm pipework feeding 15 rads and rads at the end of the runs stone cold or lukewarm. Its all about reducing pipe drops. Realising that heat likes to rise. And finally correct size pipework. Do this and u can't really go wrong.
Trying to pm you but your pm not active mate.
#9
kash2013
EN1GMA
kash2013
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size
so how much are these boilers £ wise? You've got 14 rads and i'll be having 18 so not much of a difference. does your boiler heat up the rads properly and not just luke warm. personally, I don't see the point of having all the rads when the heat output will be minimal.
that's another reason why I want zones, to be able to control the temp in the right places depending on where we are in the house(upstairs/downstairs) and also trying to control cost by not switching everything on.
how much did the plumbing cost you?
I used a vailiant 438 which is a regular boiler and 38kw. Its a excellent boiler which I brought used of eBay for £300 pounds. I went for a regular boiler so I could choose the pump and are a lot more reliable. I had it 5 years and the the person before had it 4 years. Its never ever given me any problems. I also brought a new glow worm 300l unvented tank of eBay for £300 to go with it. It didn't cost me much as I am a plumber/ electrician by trade plus various other things. If u buy a new vailiant 37kw there around £1300 +. All the rads are nice and warm and the boiler never has struggled. I also split my system into 2. Upstairs and downstairs bringing the pipes back to the boiler the increasing the size of piping from the boiler to the different zones. If u even the amount of rads and on the pipework then u won't have a problem with lukewarm rads. If u try and put 18 rads on a single branch of 22mm pipework then u definitely looking for issues. Like I explained 28mm pipework from the boiler to the zone valves then 22mm after this and you will be fine. You can go with system boiler like a 637 vailiant but u will need additional pumps after the zone valves. Or if u go for a 46kw commercial vailiant boiler then it has a larger pump built in and no additional pump will be required. But the price will be around £2500.
Also consider with less rads on at anytime make it easier for the boiler and the pump to warm the rads that are open.
Speak to you plumber and see what reply he gives u. You will then know if he understands a larger system. I seen to many big houses with a large boilers but 22mm pipework feeding 15 rads and rads at the end of the runs stone cold or lukewarm. Its all about reducing pipe drops. Realising that heat likes to rise. And finally correct size pipework. Do this and u can't really go wrong.
You don't fancy the job at my house do you? I seriously need someone like you who knows what they are doing with large houses.
#10
EN1GMA
kash2013
EN1GMA
kash2013
I would suggest a 40 kW or a commercial boiler like a vailiant 46kw. If u want warm rads then a average boiler with a built in standard pump will not be able to keep a good flow over 18 rads. If u go for a commercial boiler they have a upgraded pump then a standard domestic boiler and will be efficient enough for your demand. If u go for a domestic boiler I recommend you install additional pumps after each zone valve. A system boiler has built in pumps a regular boiler does not. It depends on how competent your plumber is to understand a large house. Also the heating pipes from the boiler to the where u split the zones i would suggest you use 28mm and not just 22mm. After you tee off then go to 22mm. I don't think a 30 kW will have the power in the cold winter months. I have 14 double rads and use a 38kw vailiant fitted with a commercial pump. But u then have to increase the flow pipes in size to adequate the extra water flow the pump produces. Otherwise it's no point going for better flow if the pipes are small in size
so how much are these boilers £ wise? You've got 14 rads and i'll be having 18 so not much of a difference. does your boiler heat up the rads properly and not just luke warm. personally, I don't see the point of having all the rads when the heat output will be minimal.
that's another reason why I want zones, to be able to control the temp in the right places depending on where we are in the house(upstairs/downstairs) and also trying to control cost by not switching everything on.
how much did the plumbing cost you?
I used a vailiant 438 which is a regular boiler and 38kw. Its a excellent boiler which I brought used of eBay for £300 pounds. I went for a regular boiler so I could choose the pump and are a lot more reliable. I had it 5 years and the the person before had it 4 years. Its never ever given me any problems. I also brought a new glow worm 300l unvented tank of eBay for £300 to go with it. It didn't cost me much as I am a plumber/ electrician by trade plus various other things. If u buy a new vailiant 37kw there around £1300 +. All the rads are nice and warm and the boiler never has struggled. I also split my system into 2. Upstairs and downstairs bringing the pipes back to the boiler the increasing the size of piping from the boiler to the different zones. If u even the amount of rads and on the pipework then u won't have a problem with lukewarm rads. If u try and put 18 rads on a single branch of 22mm pipework then u definitely looking for issues. Like I explained 28mm pipework from the boiler to the zone valves then 22mm after this and you will be fine. You can go with system boiler like a 637 vailiant but u will need additional pumps after the zone valves. Or if u go for a 46kw commercial vailiant boiler then it has a larger pump built in and no additional pump will be required. But the price will be around £2500.
Also consider with less rads on at anytime make it easier for the boiler and the pump to warm the rads that are open.
Speak to you plumber and see what reply he gives u. You will then know if he understands a larger system. I seen to many big houses with a large boilers but 22mm pipework feeding 15 rads and rads at the end of the runs stone cold or lukewarm. Its all about reducing pipe drops. Realising that heat likes to rise. And finally correct size pipework. Do this and u can't really go wrong.
You don't fancy the job at my house do you? I seriously need someone like you who knows what they are doing with large houses.
Hi sorry but I got to much work at the moment.
#11
But u could also go for another solution which is simpler and easier. This would involve installing 2 boilers of around 18kw each. This would total 36kw. U would install the upper zone direct to 1 boiler no zone valve required. And the bottom zone to the other boiler along with the indirect tank. This would allow u to make sure all the rads are warm and u could easily control the 2 zones separate and most plumbers understand this process as it's no complicated. Also 18kw system boilers are relatively cheap compared to larger model boilers. And it could be done all in 22mm pipework.


Edited By: kash2013 on Oct 23, 2016 17:15

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!