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Tools needed to hang a door?

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I am considering trying to hang a new door and use my existing one as a template. What tools do I need. I think I will new to cut 20mm off new door height. Would a saw or plain be best? Thanks Read More
millward84 Avatar
2m, 3w agoPosted 2 months, 3 weeks ago
I am considering trying to hang a new door and use my existing one as a template. What tools do I need. I think I will new to cut 20mm off new door height. Would a saw or plain be best? Thanks
millward84 Avatar
2m, 3w agoPosted 2 months, 3 weeks ago
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Responses/page:
banned#1
Jigsaw
Plane
Chisels
Drill & wood bits
Screw & Hinges

Oh & maybe a wood file for finishing off the cut

Never done it myself as I regard it out of my league


Edited By: YouDontWantToKnow on Jan 29, 2017 16:54
#2
Question.. Is the new door a solid wood door ?
#3
If you've never done it before telephone and local phone directory under joiners, it's not an easy job.
If you do do it yourself take 10mm of each end not all from one end (circular saw), electric plane, 1" and 1/4" wood chisels, mallet, wedges, pencil, straight edge, sandpaper, screwdriver(s), wood drill bits, wood spade bits, screws, hinges, handles, latch set.
Job done.

Edited By: SidSnot on Jan 29, 2017 17:27
#4
Don't try planing 20mm off the door. You will want to trim the door with a [sharp] fine cutting circular saw (or handsaw). Also, to minimise any tear out or splintering, cover your marked lines with masking tape before making the cuts. You can then use your plane if you need to make any minor adjustments. Depending on the design of your new door, you may want to remove half the material from either end of the door (ie. 10mm from the top and 10mm from the bottom) rather than taking it all from one end.
You'll need a good sharp chisel too (I personally prefer to use a laminate cutter or small handheld router) for rebating the hinges. Some wedges or a door lift will also help you lift the door to the correct height for hanging.
A pair of saw horses will make the job a lot easier and you'll need to be able to rest the door securely on its edge while chiselling rebates for hinges. For this I use a few sash clamps on the floor and it works well. Finally, make sure that your pencil is sharp!
#5
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.

List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers

Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer

Edited By: LiGhTfasT on Jan 29, 2017 17:39
#6
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.

List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers

Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer


Can you do the hinges with electric planer and what was Stanley blade for? Cheers
#7
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.
List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers
Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer
" A few passes with a planer"…...... 20mm ya havin' laugh.
#8
u can't really use a wood plane for the hinges u use wood chisels. they probably used the Stanley knife for this part instead can't really think what else it would be used for. is it a solid wood door or one of them cheap and flimsy cardboard types. I wouldn't recommend using a electric circular saw unless u use them regularly on a door it's easy enough with a good hand saw if u haven't got any of the tools already and are just going to do it once then it may be best paying someone about 15-20 quid to get it done.
#9
millward84
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.

List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers

Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer


Can you do the hinges with electric planer and what was Stanley blade for? Cheers


The planer is of no use for hinges. You'll need a sharp chisel (ideally the same width as your hinges) or a small router. The Stanley knife is used to score through the outlines you draw of the hinges prior to chiselling the waste out. By prescoring these lines, you'll get much less tear out and a neater finish.
#10
Ellie Phant
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.
List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers
Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer
" A few passes with a planer"…...... 20mm ya havin' laugh.


+1
banned#11
Mghf
Ellie Phant
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.
List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers
Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer
" A few passes with a planer"…...... 20mm ya havin' laugh.
+1

+2

More like 60
#12
skilled job. Do not attempt!
#13
I was just going to get a few cheap white internal doors from wickes and use existing ones for a template for hinges and handle.
banned#14
davewave
skilled job. Do not attempt!

Could agree more.

Not only that but by the time you buy all the tools you have spent more money than getting a pro in.
#15
Circular saw with a guide that you can set so you get a straight cut will be the best to cut the 20mm off having said that as above get a professional

Edited By: ding on Jan 29, 2017 18:19
#16
millward84
I was just going to get a few cheap white internal doors from wickes and use existing ones for a template for hinges and handle.


If you have your existing doors to use as templates and you can reuse the existing hinges then it should be pretty straightforward as the door frames won't require any attention. If you did want to replace the hinges, then provided you replace them with identically sized ones then the same situation applies. All your attention can go into trimming the doors to size and ensuring that the hinges are fitted flush and in the correct positions to line up with the existing rebates in your door frames.
It might sound obvious but be aware that most doors have a definite top and bottom. I have in the past dived in and only noticed my mistake once the door has been hung upside down so now I always offer the door up before I start and mark "top" and "bottom" to keep me honest.
#17
YouDontWantToKnow
davewave
skilled job. Do not attempt!

Could agree more.

Not only that but by the time you buy all the tools you have spent more money than getting a pro in.


Fair point

I will need 6 doors fitted so do I get the doors and fittings and look for a non cowboy joiner or get doors through a joiner? I've never replaced doors before? What sort of price is average for 6 doors fitted?
#18
Ellie Phant
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.
List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers
Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer
" A few passes with a planer"…...... 20mm ya havin' laugh.
Lol it takes off 2mm each pass and took me about 10 seconds to do a pass. Hardly a lot of work.

The planer was around £20ish from toolstation.

I'm quite handy at jobs I'll watch YouTube videos before attempting stuff but like I said I found it all very easy.
#19
If you have DIY skills and patience/time available go for it. It is relatively straight forward especially on soft wood hollow interior doors.

Some good advice above, use a jigsaw or circular saw to get the door the correct height for the frame cutting an equal amount off each end. If using a jigsaw I mask the door each side, measure, mark and draw the line along the full width then clamp a length of wood to the door as a guide to prevent the jigsaw moving off the line and cut so its still a mm too long each end then I use a belt sander to give a smooth finish to the line.

Masking tape is important for the hinges too, apply it to the door where the hinges will go. I use a steel rule, make sure your door is the right way up and again that you mark those hinges the correct side. Measure the distances using measurements of hinge position on your existing door as a guide (each door will differ slightly), mark the position on the masking tape with a pencil. I use the intended hinge, place on the door edge, use a fine pencil to draw around it very tightly then use the steel rule and a stanley/hobby knife to cut along the lines repeatedly to about 3mm deep to prevent the chissle cutting beyond the extremity of the hinge recess. Then chissle very carefully with a rubber or wooden mallet until the recess is the same depth as the hinge plate. You need sharp chissles and patience, don't rush it.

Once the hinges are fitted flush to the door edge (no deviation as you run your fingers along the edge and over the hinge) I drill and screw the hinges in place then marry up to the frame. I tend to use new hinges that are a bit bigger or the same size as the originals so the original frame recess doesn't appear once all fitted.

To marry up the door to frame I use a couple of screwdrivers placed under the door so it sits just at the correct height. If the hinge recesses in the frame needs cutting, tape then mark the position and repeat your cuts as per the door. Once its all married up screw into the frame, remove screwdrivers from under and check the door is swinging correctl. I then remove the door again and begin work on fitting the handles making sure the hinges are protected from scraping on the floor - I find it easier/safer to do the handle cut outs when the door is off and not swinging about. Fitting handles is another story.
#20
LiGhTfasT
Ellie Phant
LiGhTfasT
I fit 4 for the first time last week. Found it very easy. I bought a silverline electric planer. Job would be impossible without one imho.
List of tools I used
Electric planer
Drill
Stanley knife
Screwdrivers
Don't bother with a circular saw just do a few passes with the planer
" A few passes with a planer"…...... 20mm ya havin' laugh.
Lol it takes off 2mm each pass and took me about 10 seconds to do a pass. Hardly a lot of work.

The planer was around £20ish from toolstation.

I'm quite handy at jobs I'll watch YouTube videos before attempting stuff but like I said I found it all very easy.


The OP specifically asked if a saw or plane would be better for trimming 20mm off a door and we have subsequently learned that he actually has 6 doors to hang. You could do it with a plane, a jigsaw or indeed any number of tools but the right tool for the job is a saw, whether that is powered and circular or a hand tool.
If you are planing the end of a door, the door will be flat and you will have to hold the plane at 90 degrees to the floor in order to get the job done. If you aren't experienced this is hard to do in a controlled manner as it is so difficult to maintain an even pressure across the blade as gravity is constantly pulling the plane towards the ground. Furthermore, 2mm of material is quite a lot to take off in one pass, particularly if you are a relative novice using consumer grade power tools. Also, if you try to run the plane from one side to the other you risk tear out as you complete every pass, which is why you need to plane in to the centre from each edge. For those who are more experienced then the question is moot as they wouldn't even bother trying. Why fiddle around making hundreds of passes to whittle 120mm off six doors when you can achieve a cleaner, more accurate result with 6 single cuts.

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