Underfloor heating 4m x 4m rooms - HotUKDeals
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Underfloor heating 4m x 4m rooms

abusaleh Avatar
1y, 10m agoPosted 1 year, 10 months ago
Anyone can advise me on installing underfloor heating for 2x rooms, each being approx 4m x 4m with laminate flooring likely to be fitted?

Which would be better for heating - hot water or electric?
What are the rough running costs for these?
Anything to be cautious about?

Thanks
abusaleh Avatar
1y, 10m agoPosted 1 year, 10 months ago
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#1
I wouldn't even contemplate under floor heating unless I was super rich, multi millionaire.

My first concerns would be with good reliable quality insulation - heat rises/escapes = wasting energy.
Ensure roof fully insulated. External walls insulated.
Then improve double glazing to triple glazing.
Ensure all heating is efficient
And when laying laminate flooring - make sure you use a good thick underlay
banned#2
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philphil61
I wouldn't even contemplate under floor heating unless I was super rich, multi millionaire.

My first concerns would be with good reliable quality insulation - heat rises/escapes = wasting energy.
Ensure roof fully insulated. External walls insulated.
Then improve double glazing to triple glazing.
Ensure all heating is efficient
And when laying laminate flooring - make sure you use a good thick underlay







Agree
#3
philphil61

And when laying laminate flooring - make sure you use a good thick underlay

Even if you've got underfloor heating?

Gas underfloor is more expensive to install but cheaper to run than radiators.

If you're laying laminate on top of it, use the thinnest foam underlay possible.


http://www.uswitch.com/gas-electricity/guides/underfloor-heating/
#4
shakeyjake66
philphil61

And when laying laminate flooring - make sure you use a good thick underlay

Even if you've got underfloor heating?

Gas underfloor is more expensive to install but cheaper to run than radiators.

If you're laying laminate on top of it, use the thinnest foam underlay possible.


http://www.uswitch.com/gas-electricity/guides/underfloor-heating/

As I said I wouldn't consider underfloor heating unless I was super rich, multi millionaire

Under floor heating - I have it in my home, it's not connected, I don't even think it works anymore and I don't need it. My home has good insulation except I could change my double glazing to triple glazing - my last bill (I'm all electric) £108 (Oct to Dec)
#5
If your home already has it installed, it will be cheaper to run than radiators. If it's properly installed. That's an acknowledged fact.

You don't need to be rich to run it if it's already installed.
#6
Retro fitting underfloor heating will be expensive.

You will need to dig up the floor, I assume it's concrete. Insulate it, so that the heat doesn't go downward. Concrete it, lay the pipework for a wet system (electric systems are more expensive to run, but cheaper to install), run a screed over the top. Any floor covering you put on top should be around 0.5 tog or less. 'Cheapest' way to power it would be an earth pump, failing that gas. It's a lot of work and a lot of disruption. Depending on where you live and the ease of access, prepare yourself for an eye watering cost of circa £30k, unless you can do a lot of the work yourself. If you have very near neighbours you might also have the expense of drawing up Party Wall Agreements.

Underfloor wet systems are superb, but only really viable for new builds.
#7
I'm a fan of electric underfloor heating. We have it installed over a highly insulated concrete floor, under ceramic tile. It also has a programmable controller to take advantage of the Solar PV which we also have. Whilst I'm not going to argue that it is cheap to run, used properly and at the correct heating levels, it isn't ruinous. The other advantage is the constant ability to keep the dog dry! plus we are able to keep the 5mx5m kitchen warm with the rest of the CH turned off, kind of like an AGA effect.

I would not be keen on putting it under wood or laminate as I would be afraid of potenital warping.

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