Varifocals - peripheral vision - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Varifocals - peripheral vision

£0.00 @
Age has caught up with my eyesight :( Ordered a pair of varifocals for monitor and close up reading, which work for long distance, but for the monitor it's only sharp in a very narrow range. So … Read More
Bigfootpete Avatar
7m, 5d agoPosted 7 months, 5 days ago
Age has caught up with my eyesight :(

Ordered a pair of varifocals for monitor and close up reading, which work for long distance, but for the monitor it's only sharp in a very narrow range.

So I have to look almost directly at something to see it sharply.

Anyone else have this - it doesn't seem normal to me.

For close up - I get the same thing trying to look at my three inch wide phone, I have to move my head to see 3/4 of the screen sharply and then move my head to see the other quarter.
Bigfootpete Avatar
7m, 5d agoPosted 7 months, 5 days ago
Options

All Responses

(17) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
it can take a while to adjust, if you just got them give it a couple of days, did the optician give you the option to change them for free if you cant get used to them, most do.
#2
eslick
it can take a while to adjust, if you just got them give it a couple of days, did the optician give you the option to change them for free if you cant get used to them, most do.

I went the cheap option and got them online - saved £100 although it may end up costing more if I can't get used to them, I can't believe that this is normal to have such a narrow field of view though.
#3
I couldn't get used to them so I had to take mine back.

Maybe you could ring them and ask if what your describing is normal.
#4
with a cheap lens you get a narrower vision you will have to remember to turn your head and not your eyes or pop into a opticians and get a bit gen on the pretence of changing your glasses to varifocals for the first time


Edited By: ninegt on Nov 18, 2016 10:33: add
#5
I'm afraid it is a feature of varifocals that the close-up vision is only in focus in a narrow band down the centre of the lens, thats why its so important to get your pupillary distance measured accurately, to make sure that each eye is looking through the correct part of each lens.
The good news is that you will get used to it (not in a few days, more like a few weeks) and you will start instinctively moving your head, not your eyes, when you're doing close up work, without even having to think about it.
In the mean time be careful on stairs and with kerbs, the varifocals give a slightly distorted view when looking down so its easy to stumble or trip.
Good luck and stick with them, I found it was worth it in the end.

Edited By: Delbert Grady on Nov 18, 2016 10:43
#6
Bigfootpete
eslick
it can take a while to adjust, if you just got them give it a couple of days, did the optician give you the option to change them for free if you cant get used to them, most do.
I went the cheap option and got them online - saved £100 although it may end up costing more if I can't get used to them, I can't believe that this is normal to have such a narrow field of view though.
As others have said, keep persevering but as with many things in life you only get what you pay for. And measuring is so important. I have had varifocals many years now and am beginning to regret my purchase of my current pair - went to Specsaversto save a bob or 2. My previous independent optician had a highly qualified/experienced varifocal practitioner who took great care to measure all aspects of my eyes and face etc to ensure whatever frame I chose would complement the lens' available to me. Adds a further £100 ish to the price but I will be returning there once my eyesight deteriorates again to warrant an updated prescription.

For you, in the meantime no reason why you cant get an eye examination purely for a prescription for work with a monitor. If you are working and need this for work many employers will pay for the test and the specs if it can be shown that it is a "reasonable adjustment" for them to have to make in order for you to do your job.
#7
Varifocals come in different grades. The main difference being the better quality ones should give a wider field of view but even then there are a lot of variables. The main ones being the size/depth of the frame and the distance from your eyes. So usual advice is to go back to your optical assistant for checking of the fitting then if so no success then either try a better quality lens or get a separate pair of single lenses for the computer. Hope that helps.
#8
I agree with all the above i struggled with mine for a while however i found that if i go for the bigger lens it is easier to adjust remember not to move your head up and down but to use you evyes as this will ease the transition into wearing them
#9
Worn varifocals (Boots, so not cheap) for many years but have a seperate pair of cheap single vision specs for book reading and the laptop.



Edited By: wood33pecker on Nov 18, 2016 12:29
#10
I'm no optician but if you are spending a few hours at a time with a monitor invest in fixed reading lens for your prescription and keep them at your pc
Keep the varifocals for everyday use
My eyesight (although I'm oldish) has been tested by opticians and I've been reliably (cough, cough) informed that I need glasses to drive - about 3 months ago I did my CBT and passed the eyetest section without my glasses - the only real issue I notice is glary bright headlights at night
Now call me cynical but maybe the opticians over prescribed for some reason or another and when they went through the different options also stated varifocals was what I needed although I was concerned about the additional cost

Now if your glasses have lens the size of Dennis Taylor's you'll be fine but go anywhere near rimless and you might as well just this

Edited By: philphil61 on Nov 18, 2016 13:40
#11
philphil61
I'm no optician but if you are spending a few hours at a time with a monitor invest in fixed reading lens for your prescription and keep them at your pc
Keep the varifocals for everyday use
My eyesight (although I'm oldish) has been tested by opticians and I've been reliably (cough, cough) informed that I need glasses to drive - about 3 months ago I did my CBT and passed the eyetest section without my glasses - the only real issue I notice is glary bright headlights at night
Now call me cynical but maybe the opticians over prescribed for some reason or another and when they went through the different options also stated varifocals was what I needed although I was concerned about the additional cost
Now if your glasses have lens the size of Dennis Taylor's you'll be fine but go anywhere near rimless and you might as well just this

Thanks, I think I'll get some fixed lens rimless - these varifocals are also rimless - didn't think the rim affected what you could see.
#12
Bigfootpete
philphil61
I'm no optician but if you are spending a few hours at a time with a monitor invest in fixed reading lens for your prescription and keep them at your pc
Keep the varifocals for everyday use
My eyesight (although I'm oldish) has been tested by opticians and I've been reliably (cough, cough) informed that I need glasses to drive - about 3 months ago I did my CBT and passed the eyetest section without my glasses - the only real issue I notice is glary bright headlights at night
Now call me cynical but maybe the opticians over prescribed for some reason or another and when they went through the different options also stated varifocals was what I needed although I was concerned about the additional cost
Now if your glasses have lens the size of Dennis Taylor's you'll be fine but go anywhere near rimless and you might as well just this
Thanks, I think I'll get some fixed lens rimless - these varifocals are also rimless - didn't think the rim affected what you could see.
With rimless your lens is generally smaller (in height) than standard lens and as such will have smaller areas for the varifocal possibly the reason both you and me suffer similar
Whether you could say I was miss sold is questionable because I wanted rimless (less weight and vanity) but did I really need glasses in the first place

You should be able to use the original prescription for your "reading glasses" and potentially pick up a cheap pair online
#13
Some opticians offer varying grades of varifocal lens, good, better, best, which give different widths of varifocal, and most charge depending on what you choose, always go for a better one if you can!
Try Asda, their prices are all inclusive(frame and lenses and coatings in the price )and they only sell a wide varifocal lens, equivalent to a 'best ' width varifocal. As previously said, it can take some time to adjust to varifocals.
If looking for computer glasses, you might find an intermediate prescription better for your needs, ask your optician if he this it's suitable for you!


Edited By: paulathompson on Nov 18, 2016 20:46
#14
As has been said it's critically important that the measurements for your eyes in the frame and lenses you're opting for are accurately measured when it comes to varifocals (down to the mm). A visual example of how the lens works can be seen in the picture below, where you have an distance area, a narrow intermediate and a slightly wider reading zone. Everything else is distortion, which can be minimised by going for a better quality lens. The first step in troubleshooting varifocal lenses is always to ensure that the measurements are correct and that the lens is sitting in the right place.

http://image.slidesharecdn.com/progressiveadditionlens1-110508005853-phpapp01/95/progressive-addition-lens1-52-728.jpg


Edited By: ostinato on Nov 18, 2016 21:27
#15
I have varifocals, but to use the reading bit, you have to be looking downward through the lower half - fortunately I can see the monitor fine through the distance part, otherwise I'd have to tilt my head back.

They don't solve every problem of the old bifocals!
#16
ostinato
As has been said it's critically important that the measurements for your eyes in the frame and lenses you're opting for are accurately measured when it comes to varifocals (down to the mm). A visual example of how the lens works can be seen in the picture below, where you have an distance area, a narrow intermediate and a slightly wider reading zone. Everything else is distortion, which can be minimised by going for a better quality lens. The first step in troubleshooting varifocal lenses is always to ensure that the measurements are correct and that the lens is sitting in the right place. http://image.slidesharecdn.com/progressiveadditionlens1-110508005853-phpapp01/95/progressive-addition-lens1-52-728.jpg


They sent me a cardboard measurement thing vaguely in the shape of glasses, I had to send in a photo while I was wearing it looking straight ahead so they could take that into account.

I think these are budget plastic, another £90 and they would have sent me better lenses.
#17
Bigfootpete
They sent me a cardboard measurement thing vaguely in the shape of glasses, I had to send in a photo while I was wearing it looking straight ahead so they could take that into account.
I think these are budget plastic, another £90 and they would have sent me better lenses.

For something as important as your sight, with a product that you'll use everyday for just about every waking moment that you'll keep for about 2 years (at least) I think that going for the cheapest option isn't always the best choice. Certainly expecting a good varifocal with approximate measurements and a cheap lens, with no available support to check everything is ok and that you're looking through the correct portion of the lens, seems like a big ask.

For a simple pair of readers or driving glasses online will probably do (although will probably deliver a product of inferior quality), but I don't think online is wise for more complex lenses, especially not if it's your first experience with those lenses. Personally I'd refund the lot and pop into a proper opticians and get a good quality lens fitted properly.









Edited By: ostinato on Nov 23, 2016 16:13: spelling

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!