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What percentage of alcohol can you sell to an under 18 year old

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For example if a box of chocolates, tiramisu or profiteroles for example had a certain amount of alcohol in what is the maximum alcohol a shop in the UK could sell to a minor? Read More
MIDURIX Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
For example if a box of chocolates, tiramisu or profiteroles for example had a certain amount of alcohol in what is the maximum alcohol a shop in the UK could sell to a minor?
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MIDURIX Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
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#1
Zero.
#2
and the most stupid question of 2014 award goes to!!!!!!!!
#3
There a sign up on the liquor chocolates, saying must not be sold to an underage.
#5
adamsxi
and the most stupid question of 2014 award goes to!!!!!!!!
Anyone can buy shandy though, so I think I just got the most stupid answer of the year then
#6
Thanks for that, so all the answers above you were wrong.
#7
You can't sell zero % alcohol to under 18's but you can sell Shandy to under 18's which does contain alcohol.... bonkers UK rules. I also read that its not against the law to give alcohol to children over the age of 5 in your own home.
#8
5 and up May consume alcohol at home with adult supervision.
Under 14’s Can go into a pub with a children’s certificate, but must be with an adult and stay in the garden or family room.
Under 16’s Can go into a restaurant where alcohol is served and at licensee’s discretion may consume (but not purchase) alcohol bought by a parent or guardian as long as it is with a meal.
16-17 May purchase beer, port, cider or perry in an eating area on licensed premises (in Scotland this applies to wine too) as long as it is with a meal.
Any age No person may buy or attempt to buy intoxicating liquor for consumption in a bar by a person under the age of 18. Maximum fine £1,000.


From http://www.alcoholandyou.org.uk/society/law.html

Edited By: traceym on Dec 21, 2014 14:58
#9
traceym
5 and up May consume alcohol at home with adult supervision.
Under 14’s Can go into a pub with a children’s certificate, but must be with an adult and stay in the garden or family room.
Under 16’s Can go into a restaurant where alcohol is served and at licensee’s discretion may consume (but not purchase) alcohol bought by a parent or guardian as long as it is with a meal.
16-17 May purchase beer, port, cider or perry in an eating area on licensed premises (in Scotland this applies to wine too) as long as it is with a meal.
Any age No person may buy or attempt to buy intoxicating liquor for consumption in a bar by a person under the age of 18. Maximum fine £1,000.


From http://www.alcoholandyou.org.uk/society/law.html
good info, but it doesn't relate to my question. Let's say a profiterole has 1.2% alcohol, can a 4 year old buy it?
#10
traceym
5 and up May consume alcohol at home with adult supervision.
Under 14’s Can go into a pub with a children’s certificate, but must be with an adult and stay in the garden or family room.
Under 16’s Can go into a restaurant where alcohol is served and at licensee’s discretion may consume (but not purchase) alcohol bought by a parent or guardian as long as it is with a meal.
16-17 May purchase beer, port, cider or perry in an eating area on licensed premises (in Scotland this applies to wine too) as long as it is with a meal.
Any age No person may buy or attempt to buy intoxicating liquor for consumption in a bar by a person under the age of 18. Maximum fine £1,000.


From http://www.alcoholandyou.org.uk/society/law.html


There you go son. This peppa pig doll is from Aunty, this Winnie The Pooh doll is from Grandad and this bottle of Sambucca is from Santa.... Merry Christmas.
#11
MIDURIX
traceym
5 and up May consume alcohol at home with adult supervision.
Under 14’s Can go into a pub with a children’s certificate, but must be with an adult and stay in the garden or family room.
Under 16’s Can go into a restaurant where alcohol is served and at licensee’s discretion may consume (but not purchase) alcohol bought by a parent or guardian as long as it is with a meal.
16-17 May purchase beer, port, cider or perry in an eating area on licensed premises (in Scotland this applies to wine too) as long as it is with a meal.
Any age No person may buy or attempt to buy intoxicating liquor for consumption in a bar by a person under the age of 18. Maximum fine £1,000.


From http://www.alcoholandyou.org.uk/society/law.html
good info, but it doesn't relate to my question. Let's say a profiterole has 1.2% alcohol, can a 4 year old buy it?

Where are these profiteroles? Get in me belly!
#12
Heavy reading but here goes:

Licensing Act 2003
You are here:
2003 c. 17 Part 9 InterpretationSection 191
Meaning of “alcohol”

(1)In this Act, “alcohol” means spirits, wine, beer, cider or any other fermented, distilled or spirituous liquor, but does not include—

(a)alcohol which is of a strength not exceeding 0.5% at the time of the sale or supply in question,
(b)perfume,
(c)flavouring essences recognised by the Commissioners of Customs and Excise as not being intended for consumption as or with dutiable alcoholic liquor,
(d)the aromatic flavouring essence commonly known as Angostura bitters,
(e)alcohol which is, or is included in, a medicinal product, [F1or a veterinary medicinal product]
(f)denatured alcohol,
(g)methyl alcohol,
(h)naphtha, or
(i)alcohol contained in liqueur confectionery.

(2)In this section—
“denatured alcohol” has the same meaning as in section 5 of the Finance Act 1995 (c. 4);
“dutiable alcoholic liquor” has the same meaning as in the Alcoholic Liquor Duties Act 1979 (c. 4);
“liqueur confectionery” means confectionery which—
(a)contains alcohol in a proportion not greater than 0.2 litres of alcohol (of a strength not exceeding 57%) per kilogram of the confectionery, and
(b)either consists of separate pieces weighing not more than 42g or is designed to be broken into such pieces for the purpose of consumption;
“medicinal product” has the same meaning as in section 130 of the Medicines Act 1968 (c. 67); and
“strength” is to be construed in accordance with section 2 of the Alcoholic Liquor Duties Act 1979.
#13
Just curious but any reason for the question or are you just bored in work? :D
#14
You can buy cider or mead if eating a carvery with an adult however ;)

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