Why does pharmacy keep a copy of a patient's prescriptions? Do they inform the GP if the patient has collected his/her medicine or not? If not, then why do they take so long to get the medicines? and what information do they enter in their system abo - HotUKDeals
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Why does pharmacy keep a copy of a patient's prescriptions? Do they inform the GP if the patient has collected his/her medicine or not? If not, then why do they take so long to get the medicines? and what information do they enter in their system abo

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Why does pharmacy keep a copy of a patient's prescriptions? Do they inform the GP if the patient has collected his/her medicine or not? If not, then why do they take so long to get the medicines? and … Read More
gaumzi2002 Avatar
3m, 3w agoPosted 3 months, 3 weeks ago
Why does pharmacy keep a copy of a patient's prescriptions? Do they inform the GP if the patient has collected his/her medicine or not? If not, then why do they take so long to get the medicines? and what information do they enter in their system about the patient?
gaumzi2002 Avatar
3m, 3w agoPosted 3 months, 3 weeks ago
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#1
a. so we can check out out if you look hot or passing on a disease
b. Tell your doc if your selling the methadone or butt cream
c. we take ages to try n guess how you got the venereal disease or who you got it from or link to point a above and are laughing and pointing at you behind that mirror
d. We rate you on a minger scale as provided by the govt database 10 = super hot to 1 = don't poke even if you got paid
I am a professional pharmacist






Edited By: sowotsdis on Dec 30, 2016 19:02: err
#3
Because they can.
No they don't.
Everything.
#4
Ohh god the ill-informed (_;)

1) How do you think pharmacies make money? The prescription is a receipt to claim back.
2)The pharmacy doesn't let the doctors know, imagine how much time that would take.
3) Do you imagine it's a case of dumping said drug into a bag? Would you not imagine there is an element of patient care? I.e the pharmacist who has trained for 5 years would not give it a look over to see if the doctor has actually prescribed the right product and dose?
4) Have a think about what the pharmacist would require for future prescriptions? Drug history, patient details, doctors address and general comments (allergies, request etc)




Edited By: BarmyBulldog on Dec 31, 2016 17:06: .
banned#5
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.

Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!
#6
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.
Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!

Unless you get paid approximately £8,000 a year, then you certainly don't get paid 10% of a full-time GP. What is it with all the new account postings in the last couple of days?
#7
Oh quit moaning you just have to count tablets or pour syrup and you try to save money wherever you can
Join the Iraqi army, now that's a stressful job
#8
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.
Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!


Where are you moving to?
#9
You don't count the tablets the machine does it for you, plus if you say either in any sentence there's usually two options
Are your patient manners any good..?." well sir I'm afraid it's either chemo or most likely"
#10
Oh yeah well explain this
http://www.healthcaretechnologies.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/RX-4-Tablet-Counter1.png
or do you just sit on it to get a cheap thrill?
#11
LeavingPharma2
Ha £80k for a GP... pull the other one! I know of GPs that are getting £350 per hour... in my area for a bog standard locum the rate is £125ph plus indemnity and expenses!
I'm going to retrain either as a solicitor most likely.
And yes that's all I do - count tablets! Well done you!

Yes. £80,000 for a Partner.
A local GP practice to me paid £74,495 for their Partners in the last financial year (Full-time). Source: http://www.thefamilysurgeryorpington.nhs.uk/earnings.aspx

Don't forget the £8,500 indemnity insurance. Then the BMA Fees. Then the GMC Fees.
On top of every other job including the 9% university repayment on earnings above £21,000. Then the taxman.


Edited By: Firefly1 on Dec 30, 2016 20:39
#12
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.
Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!

So it's 91.2p plus the cost of the medicine (if they're eligible for free meds)?Genuinely interested. Do you provide an invoice for how much was provided for the medicine or get a set different amount for every one?
#13
My daughters life was probably saved by a pharmacist who realised the doctor had prescribed a ten times overdose for her in anti-histamine medication.

It took the pharmacist 30 seconds to notice a mistake it took the "quack" 10 minutes to look through books and formulate.
#14
LeavingPharma7
80k is the average salary... That includes part timers and salaried GPs too. Even a full time GP is only 8 sessions a week at 2.5 hours per session = 30 hours per week. Not bad! When you get into the real world of work you'll see for yourself! And fair play to you - I wish I had finished dentistry but pharmacy was a good career then and I didn't want to study for another four years.
If you find one of those machines in a UK pharmacy I'll give you all of the money in the world!
And the pharmacy is paid 91.2p per item plus the cost of the medicine which is set by the NHS. The £8.40 the <10% of the population pays goes to the NHS - the pharmacy doesn't get it. Big companies can make a profit on procuring the medicines. Independent pharmacies don't stand a chance! Add to this the offshore tax affairs of big companies and soon there'll only be a couple of pharmacy chains run by robots and 'technicians'!

You are true that £74,495 is the average salary that includes part timers and salaried GPs. Except that GP practice has exactly 2 GPs, both of whom are joint Partners. There are no salaried GPs that are not partners, and there are no part-time GPs. I know they work at least 4 days a week morning & afternoon each. And of course definitely 5 days a week when the other is on holiday.

£74,495 - £8,500 (Indemnity) - £443 (BMA) - £425 (GMC) = £65,127 before Tax and NI and Uni fees (9% > £21,000 for any future GP)




Edited By: Firefly1 on Dec 30, 2016 21:54
#15
I'm just messing with you
I train students to apply to uni to become pharmacists, no really I do!
The skills required are not far from a GP and I do not begrudge a single penny you make or the time and patience required to do your job every day to a high standard
#16
I'd rather they took their time and got it right and picked up any potential error a doctor could of made.
#17
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.

Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!


really I've had a few open up in my local area recently and few more opening soon they are a lot better than the slow response pharmacy next do thee doctors surgery and boots whom take around 10/15 mins when there's about 2 or 3 people whose medicine is being dispatched with about 3 or 4 staff to do something as simple as give out some antibiotics. the newer pharmacy usually take 2/3 minutes for the similar thing so good if those slower ones are shutting down. They are opening from 8am till 12pm so doubt they are not making much if new ones keep popping up. so say some tablets cost around 1 pounds where does the rest of the 7.40 go towards if the pharmacy only get 91p
#18
NHS pen pushers and the drugs companies get most of it
#19
BarmyBulldog
Ohh god the ill-informed (_;)
1) How do you think pharmacies make money? The prescription is a receipt to claim back.
2)The pharmacy doesn't let the doctors know, imagine how much time that would take.
3) Do you imagine it's a case of dumping said drug into a bag? Would you not imagine there is an element of patient care? I.e the pharmacist who has trained for 5 years would not give it a look over to see if the doctor has actually prescribed the right product and dose?
4) Have a think about what the pharmacist would require for future prescriptions? Drug history, patient details, doctors address and general comments (allergies, request etc)
Too impatient to wait for 5 mins? What about the currently waiting customers and their prescriptions?

Thanks a lot for the information. I asked this out of curiosity. I did not say that i am impatient to wait for 5 minutes. I just wondered because even if there is no one else waiting they generally ask me to wait for 10-15 minutes.

4)Do they have a centralised system? What if i go to a different pharmacist next time? Would he know about previous prescriptions?
#20
sowotsdis
a. so we can check out out if you look hot or passing on a disease
b. Tell your doc if your selling the methadone or butt cream
c. we take ages to try n guess how you got the venereal disease or who you got it from or link to point a above and are laughing and pointing at you behind that mirror
d. We rate you on a minger scale as provided by the govt database 10 = super hot to 1 = don't poke even if you got paid
I am a professional pharmacist





You seriously need to see a doctor and please go to a good pharmacist for your medicines. ;)
#21
gaumzi2002
BarmyBulldog
Ohh god the ill-informed (_;)
1) How do you think pharmacies make money? The prescription is a receipt to claim back.
2)The pharmacy doesn't let the doctors know, imagine how much time that would take.
3) Do you imagine it's a case of dumping said drug into a bag? Would you not imagine there is an element of patient care? I.e the pharmacist who has trained for 5 years would not give it a look over to see if the doctor has actually prescribed the right product and dose?
4) Have a think about what the pharmacist would require for future prescriptions? Drug history, patient details, doctors address and general comments (allergies, request etc)
Too impatient to wait for 5 mins? What about the currently waiting customers and their prescriptions?
Thanks a lot for the information. I asked this out of curiosity. I did not say that i am impatient to wait for 5 minutes. I just wondered because even if there is no one else waiting they generally ask me to wait for 10-15 minutes.
4)Do they have a centralised system? What if i go to a different pharmacist next time? Would he know about previous prescriptions?


No worries,

Your patient details are locked to that pharmacy, probably more so now with electronic prescriptions. As the prescription is sent from the doctors to a specified pharmacy of the patients choice. If it's the same company they may be able to transfer patients details depending how good they (haven't really heard of that happening though).

It's a case of the longer you use a place the more info they have for you in regards to patient history and care. (Don't stay with a pharmacy for the sake, stick with one which is best for you care)

Generally they'll ask you to wait for 10-15 mins anyway as it's always better to give you the prescription quicker, than say 5 mins and then take 15. If the pharmacy is empty and you time it, I bet it will be out in less than 5 mins.
Generally I think the consensus is 5 mins per item on the prescription, then if the drugs are more serious it will take longer.

From start to finish, the prescription has to be entered onto the system, the labels printed, items picked (or counted if needs be), checked by a dispenser then final check by the pharmacist (if you notice there are two initials on a prescription). If the pharmacist is working alone they do this themselves and will take longer to check for safety reasons.

PS, if the drugs have an interaction, or the prescription written outside of prescribing guidelines this will take longer to clarify with the doctor, or the pharmacist will cross check with the BNF (British National Formulary) - the drug dictionary.



Edited By: BarmyBulldog on Dec 31, 2016 07:09
#22
muddassarsardar
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.

Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!

really I've had a few open up in my local area recently and few more opening soon they are a lot better than the slow response pharmacy next do thee doctors surgery and boots whom take around 10/15 mins when there's about 2 or 3 people whose medicine is being dispatched with about 3 or 4 staff to do something as simple as give out some antibiotics. the newer pharmacy usually take 2/3 minutes for the similar thing so good if those slower ones are shutting down. They are opening from 8am till 12pm so doubt they are not making much if new ones keep popping up. so say some tablets cost around 1 pounds where does the rest of the 7.40 go towards if the pharmacy only get 91p


It's a government led charge, as with fuel the bulk of the cost goes to them. The pharmacy is given 91p to check the items plus the cost of the drugs back. Obviously the differences even out between the cost of 50p worth of antibiotics or £1000 worth of cancer medication for the government.
#23
BarmyBulldog
muddassarsardar
LeavingPharma
It's to get paid by the NHSBSA. The pharmacy gets paid the princely sum of 91.2p for each prescription to run an accuracy and safety check and dispense the medicine too. You can see why 25-30% of pharmacies will likely shut in the next 12 months.
Unfortunately we are so rushed off our feet I barely have time to even speak to a doctor, unless it's a potentially fatal prescribing error - which occurs more often than you can imagine. See how long you're prepared to wait in Starbucks/McDonalds, etc and then count the number of staff they have in there. Then count the number of staff in a pharmacy. And think to yourself what is the likely outcome of a mistake in McDonalds/Starbucks? Then think about the likely outcome of a mistake in pharmacy? I studied pharmacy for 5 years at university to do a stressful and risky job to get paid about 10% of what a GP gets paid. This along with impatient patients like yourself are the reason I'm leaving the profession... As most with half a brain already have/are doing!
really I've had a few open up in my local area recently and few more opening soon they are a lot better than the slow response pharmacy next do thee doctors surgery and boots whom take around 10/15 mins when there's about 2 or 3 people whose medicine is being dispatched with about 3 or 4 staff to do something as simple as give out some antibiotics. the newer pharmacy usually take 2/3 minutes for the similar thing so good if those slower ones are shutting down. They are opening from 8am till 12pm so doubt they are not making much if new ones keep popping up. so say some tablets cost around 1 pounds where does the rest of the 7.40 go towards if the pharmacy only get 91p
It's a government led charge, as with fuel the bulk of the cost goes to them. The pharmacy is given 91p to check the items plus the cost of the drugs back. Obviously the differences even out between the cost of 50p worth of antibiotics or £1000 worth of cancer medication for the government.

Thank you for the information. :)

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