10m HDMI to HDMI Cable Lead for LCD Plasma TV - £5.26 @ Amazon Sold by Peritex - HotUKDeals
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i have ordered from amazon to night so i thought i would post it to here !

10m HDMI to HDMI Cable Lead for LCD Plasma TV

there price include the delivery price :)
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#1
Difficult to know if this is a hot deal. The last cheap HDMI to mini HDMI cable I got via Amazon turned out to have a poorly shaped connector that's a little loose. It had gold plated connectors so it appeared to be good quality but the loose fitting means that it can be tempremental.

Will be interested in your assessment of the quality once your one arrives. Holding off my vote until then.
#2
3 Likes #3
jammiev
poop, get a good one!
http://www.markgrantcables.co.uk


and what would you say is a good one? all HDMI cables do the same thing, transmit 0's and 1's
#4
Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo, not another HDMI shoot out!

It's your money - buy whatever you like.
#5
expensive hdmi = snake oil, wise up.
#6
10m HDMI cable? Excuse my ignorance but why?!?

Run out of room for your Blu-Ray player in the lounge so now have it in the basement?!?

(Despite the sarcasm, this is a real question!)
#7
trebor678
jammiev
poop, get a good one!
http://www.markgrantcables.co.uk


and what would you say is a good one? all HDMI cables do the same thing, transmit 0's and 1's


this one!;

http://markgrantcables.co.uk/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=38_26&products_id=115
#8
stick your film on a 6 foot projector screen from a ps3 and you will notice the difference!
#9
At this price will the signal quality be OK? HDMI needs high frequency to transmit ofcourse which is fine at short distances, but at longer distances impedence, EM interference and SNR all come into play.

Probably about £10-£15 for a 10 meter one not seem OK? (with decent connectors)
1 Like #10
have I missed something but is the metric unit of measurement that you all speak of now a 'meter'?
2 Likes #11
jammiev
stick your film on a 6 foot projector screen from a ps3 and you will notice the difference!
The only difference you will notice will be the lightness of your wallet.
1 Like #12
CKBhuna
10m HDMI cable? Excuse my ignorance but why?!?

Run out of room for your Blu-Ray player in the lounge so now have it in the basement?!?

(Despite the sarcasm, this is a real question!)


I actually have one and find it useful. My laptop has a HDMI output so if I want to watch a bluray off my laptop in my room, I use the cable so I can control the laptop next to my bed but watch the TV on the other side of the bedroom. I thread the cable under the carpet around the edge of my room so it's not seen so it requires more length (only about 8 metres so I have some slack).

I personally have not noticed any degradation in quality compared to when I used a shorter cable however the TV in my bedroom is only 40", so with a larger screen/projector it may be visible.

Edited By: Mitman on Apr 17, 2011 23:56
#13
jammiev
stick your film on a 6 foot projector screen from a ps3 and you will notice the difference!


I'd blame the PS3, software driven BR playback and standalone BR players are now much improved.

If I were you I would buy a cheap BR player and a cheap HDMI cable for films.
#14
trebor678
jammiev
poop, get a good one!
http://www.markgrantcables.co.uk


and what would you say is a good one? all HDMI cables do the same thing, transmit 0's and 1's


As far as data transmission that's true. One of the computer magazines ran an article recently comparing £10 cables to £60 cables. There was basically no difference although in some cases cheaper cables scored more highly than the very expensive cables. However, please see my first comment about the build quality of the connector. If the machining of the connector is not accurate it can damage your port or in the case of the cable that I bought, it can rattle around making intermittent contact. Using it with my camera proves very frustrating - it keeps losing the signal completely.
#15
I bought a 1.8m cable from Peritex and it was decent quality (cable reasonably tough and connectors well-fitting) - almost certainly they buy in cables from different suppliers so my recommendation is probably worthless ;)
#16
nivs123
expensive hdmi = snake oil, wise up.


On the other hand, really cheap cables with poorly manufactured connectors = snake bite. :)

I've got an HDMI to mini HDMI where the mini HDMI is a loose fit and keeps dropping the signal completely.
#17
CannyJack
trebor678
jammiev
poop, get a good one!
http://www.markgrantcables.co.uk

and what would you say is a good one? all HDMI cables do the same thing, transmit 0's and 1's

As far as data transmission that's true. One of the computer magazines ran an article recently comparing £10 cables to £60 cables. There was basically no difference although in some cases cheaper cables scored more highly than the very expensive cables..

Can you point us to this review?
#18
pibpob
jammiev
stick your film on a 6 foot projector screen from a ps3 and you will notice the difference!
The only difference you will notice will be the lightness of your wallet.

I have to disagree with this comment based on my experience of buying a long length HDMI cable that was advertised as a 1080 compatible quality cable V1.3 compliant.
I bought a 15m cable last year and use it to run from a signal splitter hidden behind my tv downstairs that is connected to my sky hd box, a PS3 and an upscaling DVD player that outputs at 1080p.
The SKY HD will display fine on my tv upstairs that then end of the cable is connected to, but the PS3 and DVD upscaled will not output to this TV.
After much confusion, as i was also using a signal booster, i realised that this was because Sky outputs at 1080i and not 1080p unlike the PS3 and upscaled dvd. Clearly over a long distance the signal degrades and by the time it reaches the tv there is insufficient to provide a signal at 1080p.
Therefore i would suggest over a long distance like 10-15m that a bit more investment in a decent cable may prove more beneficial.....only speaking from my experience and not saying this isnt a good deal and this may well be a better quality cable than the 1 i purchased for about £15 last summer.
1 Like #19
jammiev
stick your film on a 6 foot projector screen from a ps3 and you will notice the difference!

willl you **** !
2 Likes #20
Even electrical signals power levels do degrade over longer runs, so you can lose the HDMI sync on cables greater than 5M. Though you won't lose any quality, just may not see the picture at all, or it will flicker every now and then.

Though at this price it is worth getting and seeing how it works for you. If it doesn't can always send it back. :)
#21
Audio/Video cables from high street stores are a big rip off! Curry's wanted to charge £39.99p for a 1.5m optical audio cable and £50 for a 2m version. I needed a 5m one and on Amazon it cost me £12.99 for one of comparable build quality. But they had 5m optical cables for £6 odd that would have equally done the job.
4 Likes #22
What you're paying for in a dearer cable is build quality, guarantee and reliability. Picture quality wise, is EXACTLY THE SAME.

In the end, it's personal preference and how much you value build quality and reliability. I myself, would rather buy a £5 one and risk the possibility of having to replace it a few times than buy a £50 one. Because let's be honest, you're unlikely to having to replace it 9 times anyway. My current cable for the PS3 was the cheapest one I could find online and it's been going strong for over a year, no problems whatsoever.

I'll laught at anybody who's spent £100+ just for a HDMI cable when a £5 can do the same job perfectly. Some people like to "feel" they have the superior picture because they've paid more money for it, but they're only kidding themselves.
#23
All you guys no Jack about cables. I know that the £100+ HDMI cables are better because when I had popping interference in the sound when using a £1 land Optic Lead caused by the microwave being switched on for making Popcorn, I replaced it with a £95 THX certified Optic Lead with GOLD plated connectors which solved the problem.

I know this is true because the Tech Guy explained that Plastic connectors create static, he even said that if I don't believe him I should try turning the volume higher on the AV receiver with the new cable. When I did this i could not hear the popping any more.
banned 4 Likes #24
bargain surfer
All you guys no Jack about cables. I know that the £100+ HDMI cables are better because when I had popping interference in the sound when using a £1 land Optic Lead caused by the microwave being switched on for making Popcorn, I replaced it with a £95 THX certified Optic Lead with GOLD plated connectors which solved the problem.

I know this is true because the Tech Guy explained that Plastic connectors create static, he even said that if I don't believe him I should try turning the volume higher on the AV receiver with the new cable. When I did this i could not hear the popping any more.


Is that the same "tech guy" who told you to rub bullsh*t on your bald head to make your hair grow again?

Edited By: SHOWMAN36 on Apr 18, 2011 02:02
1 Like #25
SHOWMAN36
bargain surfer
All you guys no Jack about cables. I know that the £100+ HDMI cables are better because when I had popping interference in the sound when using a £1 land Optic Lead caused by the microwave being switched on for making Popcorn, I replaced it with a £95 THX certified Optic Lead with GOLD plated connectors which solved the problem.

I know this is true because the Tech Guy explained that Plastic connectors create static, he even said that if I don't believe him I should try turning the volume higher on the AV receiver with the new cable. When I did this i could not hear the popping any more.

Is that the same "tech guy" who told you to rub bullsh*t on your bald head to make your hair grow again?

Have you met him as well?
#26
Haha, bargain surfer AKA Captain Gullible of the HMS Sucker
#27
marteee
Haha, bargain surfer AKA Captain Gullible of the HMS Sucker

Whoosh...
#28
barijohn
Even electrical signals power levels do degrade over longer runs, so you can lose the HDMI sync on cables greater than 5M. Though you won't lose any quality, just may not see the picture at all, or it will flicker every now and then.

That's probably the most succinct post that describes the situation. A cheap quality cable might not work properly, but something will be obviously wrong. If something isn't blatantly wrong then better quality couldn't be achieved with a £1000 cable due to the nature of digital signals.

Considering ordering this to run through my new flat.

Edit: Is there a cheap way of converting an HDMI signal to a SCART analogue signal? I want to run this cable to an old TV.

Edited By: dean_brfc on Apr 18, 2011 07:49
2 Likes #29
bargain surfer
All you guys no Jack about cables. I know that the £100+ HDMI cables are better because when I had popping interference in the sound when using a £1 land Optic Lead caused by the microwave being switched on for making Popcorn, I replaced it with a £95 THX certified Optic Lead with GOLD plated connectors which solved the problem.

I know this is true because the Tech Guy explained that Plastic connectors create static, he even said that if I don't believe him I should try turning the volume higher on the AV receiver with the new cable. When I did this i could not hear the popping any more.

I can't tell whether that is sarcastic or not!

Don't have your microwave near your TV and save yourself £95...
1 Like #30
I bought this when it came up on a previous deal.
Quality is not the best
#31
barijohn
Even electrical signals power levels do degrade over longer runs, so you can lose the HDMI sync on cables greater than 5M. Though you won't lose any quality, just may not see the picture at all, or it will flicker every now and then.

Though at this price it is worth getting and seeing how it works for you. If it doesn't can always send it back. :)


Completely agree. HDMI was never designed for long runs in its specification. Some people believe that this is to help prevent multiple copying from digital sources. The main reason we have HDMI is because the film industry got scared that if you conected two devices together using component video in HD you would get an almost perfect picture copy so HDMI was rolled out because it carries copy protection to prevent this. Like barijohn says buy it,try it and see if it works and if not send it back . If you have to send it back then buy a component video lead ( if your digital device will take one!) and use that as they can carry a HD signal for very very long distances without amplifaction and give an excellent picture quality. But the cable will of course cost more.


Edited By: niceblokedave on Apr 18, 2011 08:41: -
#32
RedDwarfIsCool
I bought this when it came up on a previous deal.
Quality is not the best

But...as long as it's working, it doesn't matter at all.

If it's plugged in and working, why would you care about the quality?
1 Like #33
I tend to believe this article, although what hifi have challenge the methods used in this comparison. Probably because they are highly influenced by these "top end" manufacturers. A bit like Jeremy Clarkson never has a bad word about Ford cars.

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-vs-hdmi

Make your own minds up.
#34
I'm after a long hdmi, maybe 10 maybe a bit longer. This is a good price but you can usually get one for about this price (sub £10 anyway).

For anyone wondering why I would want one this long it is because I am sending the cable from living room to bedroom tv. (with this an hdmi matrix a lot of other hdmi cables and an ir extender I will be able to view and control my virgin hd/xbox/ps3/media PC from either room - meaning for about £100 worth of tech I dont have to buy 2 of each device or pay for multi room subscription)
#35
CannyJack
nivs123
expensive hdmi = snake oil, wise up.


On the other hand, really cheap cables with poorly manufactured connectors = snake bite. :)

I've got an HDMI to mini HDMI where the mini HDMI is a loose fit and keeps dropping the signal completely.


I have a cheap one of these from HMV or Zavvi if I remember correctly- and it 100% fine.
#36
niceblokedave
barijohn
Even electrical signals power levels do degrade over longer runs, so you can lose the HDMI sync on cables greater than 5M. Though you won't lose any quality, just may not see the picture at all, or it will flicker every now and then.

Though at this price it is worth getting and seeing how it works for you. If it doesn't can always send it back. :)


Completely agree. HDMI was never designed for long runs in its specification. Some people believe that this is to help prevent multiple copying from digital sources. The main reason we have HDMI is because the film industry got scared that if you conected two devices together using component video in HD you would get an almost perfect picture copy so HDMI was rolled out because it carries copy protection to prevent this. Like barijohn says buy it,try it and see if it works and if not send it back . If you have to send it back then buy a component video lead ( if your digital device will take one!) and use that as they can carry a HD signal for very very long distances without amplifaction and give an excellent picture quality. But the cable will of course cost more.



HDMI leads have copy protection?!?
#37
Darthchaffinch
HDMI leads have copy protection?!?

High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection
#38
Darthchaffinch
niceblokedave
barijohn
Even electrical signals power levels do degrade over longer runs, so you can lose the HDMI sync on cables greater than 5M. Though you won't lose any quality, just may not see the picture at all, or it will flicker every now and then.

Though at this price it is worth getting and seeing how it works for you. If it doesn't can always send it back. :)


Completely agree. HDMI was never designed for long runs in its specification. Some people believe that this is to help prevent multiple copying from digital sources. The main reason we have HDMI is because the film industry got scared that if you conected two devices together using component video in HD you would get an almost perfect picture copy so HDMI was rolled out because it carries copy protection to prevent this. Like barijohn says buy it,try it and see if it works and if not send it back . If you have to send it back then buy a component video lead ( if your digital device will take one!) and use that as they can carry a HD signal for very very long distances without amplifaction and give an excellent picture quality. But the cable will of course cost more.



HDMI leads have copy protection?!?



Yep but more the HDMI system than the wire itself . Copy protection is part of the HDMI spec . It can be turned off if the manufacturer wants but very rarely is. Its called 'High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP)' . Gutting uhhh



Edited By: niceblokedave on Apr 18, 2011 09:47
#39
I have a 7m one to run PS3 to monitor when I can't bear to watch what is on TV. Lots more interference - green sparklies popping across the screen, when picture is stable I'd put the differences down to different brand monitor, different settings, etc. not the cable, but it does seem to drop the signal or be more prone to interference or not error correct correctly (or whatever a cable does to not transfer 1s and 0s properly) compared to the main short run cable to the TV.
#40
jk12324
What you're paying for in a dearer cable is build quality, guarantee and reliability.

A high price is no guarantee of build quality or reliability.

djgomatt
Probably because they are highly influenced by these "top end" manufacturers.
A bit like Jeremy Clarkson never has a bad word about Ford cars.

yet he **** off plenty of other top end manufacturers, thus blowing your theory out the water.

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