1200W Router - Aldi from 8th Sept - £24.99 - HotUKDeals
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1200W Router - Aldi from 8th Sept - £24.99

andrewfmills Avatar
3y, 3m agoFound 3 years, 3 months ago
Seems like a good price.

Adjustable depth stop control
Includes: Centre Pin, Parallel Guide, Template Guide, Depth Guide, Spanner, 3 Collets, 2 Router Bits

Also on offer:
12 Router bits - £6.99 - https://www.aldi.co.uk/en/specialbuys/sunday-8th-september/product-detail/ps/p/router-bits/
4 Piece Kitchen Fitter's Router Bit Set - £8.99 - https://www.aldi.co.uk/en/specialbuys/sunday-8th-september/product-detail/ps/p/4-piece-kitchen-router-bit-set/
Router Table - £29.99 - https://www.aldi.co.uk/en/specialbuys/sunday-8th-september/product-detail/ps/p/router-table/
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andrewfmills Avatar
3y, 3m agoFound 3 years, 3 months ago
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3 Likes #1
Does is support adsl2+ and fibre connections? Looking to upgrade in November or so.
1 Like #2
sphinxy
Does is support adsl2+ and fibre connections? Looking to upgrade in November or so.
Congrats on getting the first network router joke in.
No gigabit either, only quarter inch bits.
banned#3
Important - This is a non-wireless router only
#4
Will this boost my Internet connection?
#5
Would I beable to use this for joining worktops?
#6
Just found these for £8.99 in the same Aldi sale. I assume these are what I additionally need for joining worktops

https://www.aldi.co.uk/fileadmin/fm-dam/products/product_photos/Specialbuys_2013/W37/W3713_PD_Sunday_8.jpg
#7
jamgin
Would I beable to use this for joining worktops?


I've only done two kitchen work tops - which I'm very proud to say turned out nearly perfect - and I used a 1/2" 2100w Erbauer router from Screwfix which strolled through the job. I have a 1/4" Bosch router which is less powerful and there is no way I would have wanted to try and cut the worktops with that. Also half-inch bits heat up slower and dissipate heat better than 1/4 and when you are plunging through a thick worktop this is a factor. Only thing is an Erbauer 1/2" router is apparently now £150, when I got mine (albeit a different model) it was only £60 in 2006 - that's shocking inflation.
#8
The non-joke part of Andrew's post above...
andrewfmills
only quarter inch bits.
jamgin
Would I beable to use this for joining worktops?
Considering Andrew's point above, I think you'll struggle mate. You want a half inch collet/bit to cut a worktop mitre. Also, in case you're unaware, you'll fair much better with a jig. Either hire or buy...

http://www.screwfix.com/p/unika-multipurpose-worktop-jig/73542

http://www.hss.com/g/3166/Worktop-Jig.html

To give you an idea how it's done...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4F6pOoy2-8
#9
Blasphemous
The non-joke part of Andrew's post above...
andrewfmills
only quarter inch bits.

jamgin
Would I beable to use this for joining worktops?
Considering Andrew's point above, I think you'll struggle mate. You want a half inch collet/bit to cut a worktop mitre. Also, in case you're unaware, you'll fair much better with a jig. Either hire or buy...

http://www.screwfix.com/p/unika-multipurpose-worktop-jig/73542

http://www.hss.com/g/3166/Worktop-Jig.html

To give you an idea how it's done...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4F6pOoy2-8


Can't see how you would do it without a jig. Mine came off Ebay for £33. They seem to be available even cheaper now. This one is very cheap.
#10
Jamjin - re "Would I be able to use this for joining worktops?"

Can I respectfully suggest that, as worktops are expensive, you employ a professional to install them? Well fitted worktops can make pretty standard kitchen cabinets look spectacular whilst an amateur job will make even the most expensive look cheap. Honestly, if you don't know what you are doing, please don't attempt it.
#11
mclgannm
Jamjin - re "Would I be able to use this for joining worktops?"

Can I respectfully suggest that, as worktops are expensive, you employ a professional to install them? Well fitted worktops can make pretty standard kitchen cabinets look spectacular whilst an amateur job will make even the most expensive look cheap. Honestly, if you don't know what you are doing, please don't attempt it.

On the same thinking ditch your car and go on the bus. Trust "professionals" especially high paid specialist the dearer the better. That's why we all hunt for bargains on this site.
1 Like #12
mclgannm
Jamjin - re "Would I be able to use this for joining worktops?"

Can I respectfully suggest that, as worktops are expensive, you employ a professional to install them? Well fitted worktops can make pretty standard kitchen cabinets look spectacular whilst an amateur job will make even the most expensive look cheap. Honestly, if you don't know what you are doing, please don't attempt it.


I was completely amateur when I did mine, completely novice, and it was a fairly high stress job - mostly because everyone was saying how hard it was to do - but to be honest it wasn't really. Yeah I can see how you could balls it up - I've done a couple of routing projects which have gone slightly pear shaped - but the worktops were OK. When I had finished I felt bad because on one joint there is a gap on the curved bit which runs about 30mm and at its worst is about 1mm wide. I filled it with matching filler and nobody could see it but I still felt bad. Until every time I went into friends hugely expensive "professionally" fitted kitchens and saw the filled gaps in their worktops. I reckon two out of three were worse than mine - many awfully bad.

If you are brave and willing to do the research on how to cut a worktop then go for it. I didn't speak to a single kitchen fitter or joiner - I got all the info off of the web and it still worked out OK. I'm a bit fed up with the way the World seems to be going - that everything you ever have, has to be sold to you by an "expert" Less and less people seem to take carefully considered risks these days and do things for themselves.
#13
VDisillusioned


Can't see how you would do it without a jig. Mine came off Ebay for £33. They seem to be available even cheaper now. This one is very cheap.


I wouldn't recommend it, but my dad did ours before he got a jig, and have to say the joints were a perfect fit - no gaps whatsoever. It was just a matter of measuring very accurately and clamping straight edged pieces of wood as a guide. I think he may of used the round edge of the router base to guide the router rather than a bush as you'd use with a jig, And finished the corners by hand. He eventually bought a jig because he was always getting asked to joint worktops, and its a lot quicker and easier with one.

He uses a 1/2" Elu MOF177e router (fairly high wattage and a very large depth of plunge) and wouldn't consider using less than a half inch router to route a worktop. Apart from the lack of power and lack of plunge depth of smaller routers, 1/4" collets don't grip the bits so well, so you have to do far less aggressive cuts or the bits will vibrate spoiling the edge. Also the bits are weaker, and ideally want a router with enough depth of plunge so the bit can be fully retracted.




Edited By: melted on Sep 03, 2013 11:10: .
#14
This is what I love about hotukdeals.
Many thanks everybody for some very good advice.
I'll have to price the cost of buying the bits I need against getting a pro in. Luckily I can practice on the worktop I will be ripping out if go down the diy route.
Must get the kitchen units assembled....X)
#15
jamgin
This is what I love about hotukdeals.
Many thanks everybody for some very good advice.
I'll have to price the cost of buying the bits I need against getting a pro in. Luckily I can practice on the worktop I will be ripping out if go down the diy route.
Must get the kitchen units assembled....X)

It has a max plunge depth of 52mm how thick is your worktop?
You can try mounting the router bit as low as possible. It probably will do a worktop just dont rush it take off 10mm with each pass. If you feel it starting to struggle back it off and take less.

I would recommend using a jig and watch a few youtube videos
#16
Thanks for all the advice. I've been keeping an eye out for this deal for a while as I too am going to be doing a bit of work in the kitchen. I figured I'd leave the worktop fitting to a professional, but I have a few cut outs in cabinets to make for the consumer unit and a soil pipe. After a bit of research I saw that the 1/2" routers are better for doing worktops, but would this be alright for thinner materials?

Anybody own one of these specific routers have any comments? I know Aldi has sold them the last couple of years.

Also it looks very similar to this SIP router at £95, but The Aldi one is lower powered.
http://www.sipuk.co.uk/sip-router-1500w-variable-speed-01478.html?___store=sipuk&___store=sipuk
#17
VDisillusioned
Blasphemous
The non-joke part of Andrew's post above...
andrewfmills
only quarter inch bits.
jamgin
Would I beable to use this for joining worktops?
Considering Andrew's point above, I think you'll struggle mate. You want a half inch collet/bit to cut a worktop mitre. Also, in case you're unaware, you'll fair much better with a jig. Either hire or buy...

http://www.screwfix.com/p/unika-multipurpose-worktop-jig/73542

http://www.hss.com/g/3166/Worktop-Jig.html

To give you an idea how it's done...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4F6pOoy2-8

Can't see how you would do it without a jig. Mine came off Ebay for £33. They seem to be available even cheaper now. This one is very cheap.
It can be done with a couple of pieces of wood clamped to the worktop (used as a guide), but it's a pita if the clamps come loose/move.
#18
andrewfmills
Thanks for all the advice. I've been keeping an eye out for this deal for a while as I too am going to be doing a bit of work in the kitchen. I figured I'd leave the worktop fitting to a professional, but I have a few cut outs in cabinets to make for the consumer unit and a soil pipe. After a bit of research I saw that the 1/2" routers are better for doing worktops, but would this be alright for thinner materials?

Anybody own one of these specific routers have any comments? I know Aldi has sold them the last couple of years.

Also it looks very similar to this SIP router at £95, but The Aldi one is lower powered.
http://www.sipuk.co.uk/sip-router-1500w-variable-speed-01478.html?___store=sipuk&___store=sipuk
For the jobs you've described then, I'd personally go with a Multi Cutter. Much more versatile and easier to work with inside a cabinet. A router is more suited to being used as either a plunge tool and/or a tool that requires some form of guide. It is a large cumbersome beast to use especially inside a cabinet. A Multi Cutter on the other hand is a tool that allows you to get into fairly tight spaces, it will allow you to cut a variety of materials (Tool Bit dependent of course), and is very versatile, it can even be used as a sander (again, Tool Bit dependant).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztIG_webUfM

http://www.tooled-up.com/product/bosch-pmf-180e-all-rounder-3-in-1-multi-tool-cuts-saws-sands-180w-240v/143839/?Referrer=googleproductlisting&gclid=CNLtwd65r7kCFbHKtAod5jsAmQ




Edited By: Blasphemous on Sep 03, 2013 16:02: .
#19
Blasphemous
andrewfmills
Thanks for all the advice. I've been keeping an eye out for this deal for a while as I too am going to be doing a bit of work in the kitchen. I figured I'd leave the worktop fitting to a professional, but I have a few cut outs in cabinets to make for the consumer unit and a soil pipe. After a bit of research I saw that the 1/2" routers are better for doing worktops, but would this be alright for thinner materials?Anybody own one of these specific routers have any comments? I know Aldi has sold them the last couple of years.Also it looks very similar to this SIP router at £95, but The Aldi one is lower powered.http://www.sipuk.co.uk/sip-router-1500w-variable-speed-01478.html?___store=sipuk&___store=sipuk
For the jobs you've described then, I'd personally go with a Multi Cutter. Much more versatile and easier to work with inside a cabinet. A router is more suited to being used as either a plunge tool and/or a tool that requires some form of guide. It is a large cumbersome beast to use especially inside a cabinet. A Multi Cutter on the other hand is a tool that allows you to get into fairly tight spaces, it will allow you to cut a variety of materials (Tool Bit dependent of course), and is very versatile, it can even be used as a sander (again, Tool Bit dependant).http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztIG_webUfMhttp://www.tooled-up.com/product/bosch-pmf-180e-all-rounder-3-in-1-multi-tool-cuts-saws-sands-180w-240v/143839/?Referrer=googleproductlisting&gclid=CNLtwd65r7kCFbHKtAod5jsAmQ

Thanks for the advice. Coincidentally I was talking to a colleague today about it and they also recommended a multi cutter. I've seen them before but never seen one in action, so I'll take a look at the video
#20
andrewfmills
Blasphemous
andrewfmills
Thanks for all the advice. I've been keeping an eye out for this deal for a while as I too am going to be doing a bit of work in the kitchen. I figured I'd leave the worktop fitting to a professional, but I have a few cut outs in cabinets to make for the consumer unit and a soil pipe. After a bit of research I saw that the 1/2" routers are better for doing worktops, but would this be alright for thinner materials?Anybody own one of these specific routers have any comments? I know Aldi has sold them the last couple of years.Also it looks very similar to this SIP router at £95, but The Aldi one is lower powered.http://www.sipuk.co.uk/sip-router-1500w-variable-speed-01478.html?___store=sipuk&___store=sipuk
For the jobs you've described then, I'd personally go with a Multi Cutter. Much more versatile and easier to work with inside a cabinet. A router is more suited to being used as either a plunge tool and/or a tool that requires some form of guide. It is a large cumbersome beast to use especially inside a cabinet. A Multi Cutter on the other hand is a tool that allows you to get into fairly tight spaces, it will allow you to cut a variety of materials (Tool Bit dependent of course), and is very versatile, it can even be used as a sander (again, Tool Bit dependant).http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztIG_webUfMhttp://www.tooled-up.com/product/bosch-pmf-180e-all-rounder-3-in-1-multi-tool-cuts-saws-sands-180w-240v/143839/?Referrer=googleproductlisting&gclid=CNLtwd65r7kCFbHKtAod5jsAmQ

Thanks for the advice. Coincidentally I was talking to a colleague today about it and they also recommended a multi cutter. I've seen them before but never seen one in action, so I'll take a look at the video
You're welcome. That link is the best price I could find. I have seen them on offer for around £40 though. Been a few posted on here. So it might be worth waiting to see if one comes up but if you need it, as I say, that is the best price I could find right now. You won't regret buying one, they're excellent for all sorts of jobs.

Edited By: Blasphemous on Sep 03, 2013 17:03
#21
Practice on the old worktop :{
1 Like #22
smileypete
Practice on the old worktop :{
It doesn't take a lot of practice. The most important three points to remember/get right are:

1. MEASURE IT, MEASURE IT AGAIN and MEASURE IT AGAIN!

2. CHECK AND CHECK AND CHECK AGAIN that you are cutting the bench to the correct 'hand'. I've lost count of how many times I've seen (And Carpenters too), a bench being cut only for the cut to have been made on the wrong 'hand'.

and

3. When you're cutting into the facing edge of the bench (the part that faces into the room as opposed to the back of the bench nearest the wall), make sure you cut so that any 'break away' is on the waste side of the cut. In short, the cutter rotates, it makes a clean cut on its attack but can cause the edge of the formica to splinter and chip off at the 'back edge' of the cutter. You may need to reverse the bench (turn it over), to ensure you do not chip the 'clean' edge.

I hope that makes sense.


Edited By: Blasphemous on Sep 04, 2013 00:34: .
1 Like #23
I would add: relax but focus, make sure the dust extraction hose (vacuum cleaner) if you are using one, isn't going to snag anywhere, and when you are cutting the dog bone clamping holes - make sure the depth-stop is as tight as you can get it - I just remembered that incident ;)

Edited By: VDisillusioned on Sep 03, 2013 23:57
#24
Some good advice here, personally I'd go to Screwfix & get a 1/2" router for about £100 but then I'd get plenty of use out of it, not just use it for 1 job & put it in the garage to gather dust.

As for these particular routers, I was given one last year & I have to say I'm very impressed with it. It's very smooth running, compared to some "professional" routers and produces a really clean finish with some decent bits fitted, I've never actually used the bits supplied with the router. Get a decent set of tct buts, you can get 12 assorted buts for £20 or so, and give it a go. The depth setting gauge is plastic & not sure the collars & bits supplied are up to much but the router itself is a bargain & such a versatile tool to use.
#25
Shezza 1971
I was given one last year & I have to say I'm very impressed with it. It's very smooth running, compared to some "professional" routers and produces a really clean finish with some decent bits fitted, I've never actually used the bits supplied with the router. Get a decent set of tct buts, you can get 12 assorted buts for £20 or so, and give it a go. The depth setting gauge is plastic & not sure the collars & bits supplied are up to much but the router itself is a bargain & such a versatile tool to use.

Thanks for the info. I think I'll pick one up anyway. Besides working on the kitchen I fancied a bash at a few basic projects like making some picture frames to begin. At £25 I won't have wasted much money if it ends up at the back of a cupboard gathering dust.

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