£159.99 Celestron SkyProdigy 70mm Computerised Telescope Costco - HotUKDeals
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£159.99 Celestron SkyProdigy 70mm Computerised Telescope Costco

£159.99 @ costco
Celestron SkyProdigy 70mm Computerised Telescope\ Seems to be over £270 at Amazon and has an RRP of £470 Reviews seem to make this a perfect beginner scope with auto alignment and tracking. Amate…
lcassey Avatar
2m, 3d agoFound 2 months, 3 days ago
Celestron SkyProdigy 70mm Computerised Telescope\
Seems to be over £270 at Amazon and has an RRP of £470 Reviews seem to make this a perfect beginner scope with auto alignment and tracking.

Amateur astronomy is a great family hobby that can be enjoyed all year round. The SkyProdigy series is a fully computerised self-align telescope with no tools required, allowing for the user to easily begin to enjoy the wonders of the Universe and be taken on a tour of the sky by the inbuilt computer and motorised mount.

The Celestron SkyProdigy 70 is a truly revolutionary product with ground breaking technology and is a product of a culmination of decades of telescopic advancements. It combines electronic motors, an intelligent on-board computer, a digital camera, and StarSense technology to create an automatic, instant alignment telescope that requires no input from the user. Simply turn it on, push a button and enjoy the view.

If you are not sure what to look at, the Sky Tour feature offers a customised list of the best objects in the sky to view for your exact time and location anywhere in the world. No knowledge of the night sky is required, the integrated imaging camera and StarSense technology automatically processes the image and aligns the telescope.

The included eyepieces allow for 28x and 78x magnifications and a no tool setup tripod and motorised mount make for a quick start up. In-built imaging camera is used for the automatic alignment procedure of the telescope, images cannot be accessed by the user.

Features:

Quick and easy setup - no tools required
Fully computerised and self-align
Inbuilt computer and motorised mount
StarSense technology
Eyepiece 1: Magnification: 28x
Eyepiece 2: Magnification: 78x
Finderscope: Starpointer
Mount Type: Motorised Altazimuth
Accessory Tray: No tool, quick release
Tripod: Steel
Highest Magnification: 165x
Lowest Magnification: 10x
Light Gathering Power (vs. Human Eye): 100x
Slew Speeds: 9
Optical Tube Length: 27" (68.6cm)
Specifications

Focal Length: 700mm
Aperture: 70mm
Brand: Celestron
Magnification: 28x / 78x
Type: Telescope
Colour: Red
- See more at: http://www.costco.co.uk/view/p/celestron-skyprodigy-70mm-computerised-telescope-224460#sthash.hmW3vZHw.dpuf
More From costco:
lcassey Avatar
2m, 3d agoFound 2 months, 3 days ago
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(19) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Bought for my little one, thanks.
#2
Great for price, nice find
#3
Do you have sign up for membership first?
#4
GDawes
Do you have sign up for membership first?

Usually 5% more if not a member.
#5
Anyone know whether this can clearly see planets?
3 Likes #6
To "clearly see" planets... you need this:
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/hubble_components_diagram.png
#7
Youll be VERY lucky if saturn looks like this through a domestic 'scope... https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3nrQ-h9Qmds/hqdefault.jpg
1 Like #8
In how much detail would i be able to see Uranus using this?
3 Likes #9
red23
In how much detail would i be able to see Uranus using this?


In cracking detail. You'll see a whole lot of it for what isn't an asstronomicaly high price. Heat added. Apologies op for the cheeky and juvenile comment. :-)
#10
​Thats about the best I'd expect from this sort of telescope... I've managed to get a similar view of Saturn and Jupiter with mine (Skywatcher Heritage-130p Flextube) which is still amazing considering how far away they are. This is self aligning so probably better than mine
1 Like #11
RoosterNo1
Youll be VERY lucky if saturn looks like this through a domestic 'scope... https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3nrQ-h9Qmds/hqdefault.jpg

This just isn't true... Being the owner of a C6 and C11, I can assure you it's possible to see Saturn FAR better than that.

For example, this is a shot through the smaller C6.

http://astro-images.com/saturn-170408-2.jpg

C11 shot for reference... (yes, this is slightly more than £170, but still, it's a domestic scope, and certainly not the best available).

http://www.elec-intro.com/EX/05-14-23/2195757-Saturn_20080210_01hUTc.jpg

I expect this little refractor will do a good enough job (refractors are ideal for planets due to their higher magnification BTW). I have a small EPO refractor that produces stunning images with a decent quality barlow lens.



Edited By: MarkSwift on Dec 23, 2016 15:47: Typo
3 Likes #12
MarkSwift
RoosterNo1
Youll be VERY lucky if saturn looks like this through a domestic 'scope... https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3nrQ-h9Qmds/hqdefault.jpg
This just isn't true... Being the owner of a C6 and C11, I can assure you it's possible to see Saturn FAR better than that.
For example, this is a shot through the smaller C6.http://astro-images.com/saturn-170408-2.jpg
C11 shot for reference... (yes, this is slightly more than £170, but still, it's a domestic scope, and certainly not the best available).http://www.elec-intro.com/EX/05-14-23/2195757-Saturn_20080210_01hUTc.jpg
I expect this little refractor will do a good enough job (refractors are ideal for planets due to their higher magnification BTW). I have a small EPO refractor that produces stunning images with a decent quality barlow lens.


But to be fair you ARE NOT SEEING those images, are you ? you are taking tons of photos and gluing them together - which takes more kit, and better telescope than this.. its an ENTIRELY different hobby, and irrelevant to the question.
#13
as a keen amateur astronomer myself. I would advise against buying this. A skywatcher st80 or a reflector could be had for less than this. on a manual mount tho. but you can always get an app for your phone to help you find your way around.
3 Likes #14
Actually the views are not much different to what is visible with the naked eye with my Baader Hyperion zoom eyepiece.

There's little difference between this and the ST80, obviously the lower focal range and shorter tube bring some inherent advantages, but at the cost of chromatic aberration, the tubes are optically on par. An ST80 while a capable short tube would be a bad buy when this is available on sale.

The mount alone is worth the price, the self alignment feature, in standalone form costs in excess of £200 (it's the same system just integrated into the mount). Our local group contains a number of SkyProdigy 6" users and the most experienced members are normally very complimentary of its capabilities; even though I would suggest the mount is very much at its limit carrying a 6" SCT.

This setup is excellent at promoting the hobby, self alignment ensures newcomers enjoy the view and don't get caught up in the monotony of setup - it's a killer for most when getting started. Upgrades are always available once an interest in the hobby is established, I'd suggest little will be lost on resale given the price this is currently on sale at.

I'm just passing on my opinion as an amateur astronomer and astrophotographer (Once the very proud owner of a LX600-ACF). Take it or leave it :)

Edited By: MarkSwift on Dec 23, 2016 18:30: Typo
#15
If anyone is passing by and really wants an optical bargain, check out the 'ED' refractors from people like Ian King. They're unbeatable for the price point (but obviously you'll need a mount).

Note: Refractors are per se planetary scopes. The fast short tubes however open up the world of deep space (with some caveats). Astronomy is a journey of research and reading ;)
2 Likes #16
RoosterNo1
To "clearly see" planets... you need this:https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/hubble_components_diagram.png

When this is on offer please make sure you post it ;)
#17
RoosterNo1
To "clearly see" planets... you need this:https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/hubble_components_diagram.png
I currently have in garage 2 or 3 of those, so anybody wanna buy just send message..
#18
RoosterNo1
MarkSwift
RoosterNo1
Youll be VERY lucky if saturn looks like this through a domestic 'scope... https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3nrQ-h9Qmds/hqdefault.jpg
This just isn't true... Being the owner of a C6 and C11, I can assure you it's possible to see Saturn FAR better than that.
For example, this is a shot through the smaller C6.http://astro-images.com/saturn-170408-2.jpg
C11 shot for reference... (yes, this is slightly more than £170, but still, it's a domestic scope, and certainly not the best available).http://www.elec-intro.com/EX/05-14-23/2195757-Saturn_20080210_01hUTc.jpg
I expect this little refractor will do a good enough job (refractors are ideal for planets due to their higher magnification BTW). I have a small EPO refractor that produces stunning images with a decent quality barlow lens.
But to be fair you ARE NOT SEEING those images, are you ? you are taking tons of photos and gluing them together - which takes more kit, and better telescope than this.. its an ENTIRELY different hobby, and irrelevant to the question.


Calm down dear.... most people are happy enough looking at the moon!
#19
Mark, nice shots but to be fair they are going to mislead people who are buying for their kids. They will not see saturn link that in the 70mm scope here. It'll be more like the 1st image that was posted.
I've an ETX 125 and get shots like yours but even at that visually it's not the same.
The bulk of the money in this scope is in the drive and go to. For the price it's ok but the advice I'd always give ANYONE thinking about buying a scope is to talk to someone in an astronomy club. There are thousands all over the UK and all of them will be delighted to answer any questions I'ms sure of it. Even go to one of your local clubs meetings and ask. They may even loan you a scope to use!

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