2.6GHz E5300 CPU + 1TB Samsung hard drive + 4GB Corsair ram + Gigabyte GA-G31M-ES2L iG31 Express Motherboard Combo [£172.49 @ Scan] - HotUKDeals
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2.6GHz E5300 CPU + 1TB Samsung hard drive + 4GB Corsair ram + Gigabyte GA-G31M-ES2L iG31 Express Motherboard Combo [£172.49 @ Scan]

£172.49 @ Scan
Today Only - Will expire around 1PM tomorrow. Assuming you have free Hexus forum delivery. Seems like a good deal. Worked it out as £205 + Del @ Ebuyer. Throw in a case + power supply + graphics card… Read More
mamboboy Avatar
7y, 11m agoFound 7 years, 11 months ago
Today Only - Will expire around 1PM tomorrow.
Assuming you have free Hexus forum delivery. Seems like a good deal. Worked it out as £205 + Del @ Ebuyer. Throw in a case + power supply + graphics card* and you have yourself a decent rig :)
*Motherboard has inbuilt graphics if you didn't want to get one :)
Included components:

* Intel Pentium Dual-Core, E5300, S775, Wolfdale, 2.6 GHz, 2MB Cache, 13x Core Ratio, 65W, Retail
* Gigabyte GA-G31M-ES2L iG31 Express, S775, PCI-E (x16), DDR2 1066(OC)/ 800 MHz, SATA II, Micro ATX
* 1TB Samsung HD103UJ Spinpoint F1, SATA 3Gb/s, 7200rpm, 32MB Cache, 8.9 ms, NCQ
* 4GB (2x2GB) Corsair TwinX DDR2 XMS2, PC2-8500 (1066), 240 Pin, Non-ECC Unbuffered, CAS 5-6-6-18, EPP
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mamboboy Avatar
7y, 11m agoFound 7 years, 11 months ago
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#1
good times
#2
I'm a bit out of touch, so can anyone give me the pros & cons of this deal? Also what size of PSU would be needed (e.g. would a TAGAN 460W suffice)?
#3
jnm21
I'm a bit out of touch, so can anyone give me the pros & cons of this deal? Also what size of PSU would be needed (e.g. would a TAGAN 460W suffice)?


Depends on the graphics card.If you were to run it as is a decent 250w PSU would do.I have this same mobo CPU combo running at 3.2ghz so fsster than a £160 CPU
#4
How upgradable will the CPU be in the coming years? Isn't everything going over to I7? Will I be stuck with a mobo unable to take the newest chips?
#5
Voted cold. Might aswell go for a ready built box at Ebuyer.

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/164667

Same CPU and ammount of ram.
#6
belovedmonster
How upgradable will the CPU be in the coming years? Isn't everything going over to I7? Will I be stuck with a mobo unable to take the newest chips?


if you install a full version of windows then you can upgrade the motherboard too, If you are looking at I7 then you are looking at double this price at least,
#7
don't forget it would be a good idea to get a dvd drive aswell as wat u listed. theyr cheap tho. hot deal tho
#8
Are you sure it has onboard graphics?
#9
#10
Clown
Are you sure it has onboard graphics?

Good point, it says no when you look at the mobo's specs, I don't remember seeing another mobo with no onboard graphics though.
#11
Ah right, there's a big red X on Scan's product page :)
But then it says 1 x D-sub which is VGA isn't it?
#12
according to the manufacture see link above it has on board GFX
#13
The 'G' in G31 stands for graphics
#14
How does the CPU compare to say a AMD Phenom x3 ? (the benchmark charts are a bit much for me).
#15
That looks like a pretty good deal! E5300 is a pretty fast processor.
#16
Would this be suitable for running media centre on windows 7, playing the odd mkv and using a music program like ableton with quite a few plugins running. I have a pentium 4 currently that has only recently started to fall behind with what i need it to do- is this significantly more powerful?
#17
belovedmonster
How upgradable will the CPU be in the coming years? Isn't everything going over to I7? Will I be stuck with a mobo unable to take the newest chips?


It can still take Core 2 Quad and Core 2 Extreme CPUs, which will no doubt be coming down in price in the future.
1 Like #18
ssouthall6;5934480
Would this be suitable for running media centre on windows 7, playing the odd mkv and using a music program like ableton with quite a few plugins running. I have a pentium 4 currently that has only recently started to fall behind with what i need it to do- is this significantly more powerful?


It will perform just fine as a media center, although I didn't check whether it had dual outs so you can run it with a TV and a monitor. Ideally for a media center you'd want at least one HDMI out.

The onboard sound is going to be poor for music work, probably want to add an external sound card.

Overall this is an ok deal but there are many compromises here. The onboard graphics are abysmal for instance. I think once you start to pay near £200, you might as well get the exact motherboard you need and at least on the AMD side, you can put together a great bundle with AM2+ motherboard. Intel I still dont think has a great presence in the budget range.
#19
Looks like the kind of thing I'm looking for to use as a fairly powerful machine for work, not wanting to run games on it, however I'm looking to use 3 or 4 monitors from the one PC, anyone recommend an inexpensive graphics card to enable me to do this? And I could do with a TV card in there too...
banned#20
Yowzer
however I'm looking to use 3 or 4 monitors from the one PC


Bloody hell, do you work on the Minority Report?

To do that, you need a motherboard with 2x PCIE slots (it can be a x16 and x1 slot, as long as they're both the correct layout), and two graphics cards. If you're running vista, the graphics cards have to use the same drivers. IE two Nvidia OR two ATI cards. Windows XP/7 you can use whatever you want. Dead simple to setup, just like you do when setting two monitors up normally. Except there are three/four.

The other options, are one of those USB to VGA adapters. But they are very slow. And also one of the Matrox graphics cards, but they are much more expensive. (triplehead2go/quadhead2go I think they're called).

Or, my final option, is to just buy bigger monitors.
#21
Yowzer;5935246
Looks like the kind of thing I'm looking for to use as a fairly powerful machine for work, not wanting to run games on it, however I'm looking to use 3 or 4 monitors from the one PC, anyone recommend an inexpensive graphics card to enable me to do this? And I could do with a TV card in there too...


Just get a motherboard that already has two outs, an AM2 based 8200 model should do there, then plug in an nVidia graphics of around the same spec (they are dirt cheap this low end) and you'll have 4 outs for 4 monitors.

http://www.ebuyer.com/product/152752

Here's an example of a motherboard that will do that but this is by no means the only one. There are many more both cheaper and pricier on AMD and Intels side. It isn't necessary to get two graphics cards and going that route, you could end up paying more for a motherboard that will take two. The onboard graphics/one gfx card route is the cheapest way to get office ready 4 display setup.
banned#22
Oh, and as for your TV card, thats never a problem. Just go USB.
#23
Thanks guys.

I do a fair bit of design and like lots of desktop room. I'm currently running a PC with a large monitor and a laptop with another large monitor plugged in so already have 3 screens on 2 PC's, but fancy going to just one PC and adding another screen to watch TV at the same time.

You both mention two graphics cards, does that mean I'm able to simply split the signal from each graphics card into 2 with a simple VGA splitter cable or is it more complex than that? And does that work with any graphics card?

I did like the idea of going for Intel over AMD, and was keen on a ready built PC like the cheap eBuyer one, but I can't see any info on the PCIE slots on that.
#24
techpops
It will perform just fine as a media center, although I didn't check whether it had dual outs so you can run it with a TV and a monitor. Ideally for a media center you'd want at least one HDMI out.

The onboard sound is going to be poor for music work, probably want to add an external sound card.

Overall this is an ok deal but there are many compromises here. The onboard graphics are abysmal for instance. I think once you start to pay near £200, you might as well get the exact motherboard you need and at least on the AMD side, you can put together a great bundle with AM2+ motherboard. Intel I still dont think has a great presence in the budget range.


Thanks very much for the response. I already have an external firewire sound card and an ati hd4350 pcie graphics card- all i've been looking for really is a new mobo and processor to cope with the expansion. So if not this, for the extra £25 or so what would you recommend?
1 Like #25
Yowzer;5935796
Thanks guys.

I do a fair bit of design and like lots of desktop room. I'm currently running a PC with a large monitor and a laptop with another large monitor plugged in so already have 3 screens on 2 PC's, but fancy going to just one PC and adding another screen to watch TV at the same time.

You both mention two graphics cards, does that mean I'm able to simply split the signal from each graphics card into 2 with a simple VGA splitter cable or is it more complex than that? And does that work with any graphics card?

I did like the idea of going for Intel over AMD, and was keen on a ready built PC like the cheap eBuyer one, but I can't see any info on the PCIE slots on that.


Ok how it would work. You plug each monitor into each out, assuming they are all digital outs and all your screens are LCD screens. You may need one or two HDMI to DVI convertors. Just little cheap adaptors.

Windows will recognise all four displays and they should appear in display settings. You can customise how the screens will behave in the driver settings. So each screen could be one quarter of your desktop, or each screen could be a clone of the other screen.

The most I've done is three screens and Windows handled it without any hassles.

If you go Intel, my knowledge dips there and I'm not able to talk about intel chipsets that work well with quadruple display setups.

If you're doing 3 monitors and a TV then you run into the possible issue of mistmatched resolutions. Say your monitors run at 1680x1050 resolution but your TV only does standard def or 720p. The resolutions wont match and you wont be able to have a seamless desktop where your cursor can travel around the edge of each screen and appear on the other screen where you'd expect it would. One desktop is going to be a different res and obviously being a TV, it's going to be useless for running graphics software.

If I were you here, I'd forget the TV. Just use 3 LCD screens on one PC for your work and get a different solution for the TV. It'll be easier to setup. Whether its a freeview box or something like that, it wont be a drain on your main computers performance as in my experience, dedicating a computer to be a video source bogs it down.

In a little more detail here is what you're looking for. A motherboard that has two DVI outs (assuming your monitors are LCD flat panels) If they are all big bulky CRT monitors then you need VGA (also called dsub) Once you've found a motherboard that has two digital outs. Usually configured as one DVI and one HDMI on modern boards (the adaptor comes in here to turn the hdmi into dvi) you then need to find out if adding a graphics card to it will disable the onboard graphics. If so its no good.

That's the reason I chose the 8200's from nVidia, they are able to run along with a graphics card you plug in.

So assuming you get this far, you now have your motherboard. Just need to buy a graphics card that matches the onboard graphics. They don't have to be exactly the same, just not older. So if the gfx chipset is 8200, you dont want to be buying a 7000 series card. Get an 8000 or 9000 series card.

A final caveat going the onboard route. You will lose system memory. Possibly 256mb or more. So budget for that with your main memory. 4gb running a 64bit version of Windows 7 you're going to be left with 3.5gb of system memory or slightly more. If you go for a 32bit OS, itll be even less. You may end up with under 3gb free even though you bought 4gb.

Sorry a lot of info there, any probs with any of it and I'll do my best to explain if I know.
#26
ssouthall6;5935953
Thanks very much for the response. I already have an external firewire sound card and an ati hd4350 pcie graphics card- all i've been looking for really is a new mobo and processor to cope with the expansion. So if not this, for the extra £25 or so what would you recommend?


You're good to go then. The 4350 is going to be far superior to the onboard graphics, you've got good sound and the rest is all fine in this deal. Everything you asked your PC to do this will do happily and I think you'll be pretty impressed with the speed bump from your current system.:thumbsup:
banned 1 Like #27
Yowzer
Thanks guys.

I do a fair bit of design and like lots of desktop room. I'm currently running a PC with a large monitor and a laptop with another large monitor plugged in so already have 3 screens on 2 PC's, but fancy going to just one PC and adding another screen to watch TV at the same time.

You both mention two graphics cards, does that mean I'm able to simply split the signal from each graphics card into 2 with a simple VGA splitter cable or is it more complex than that? And does that work with any graphics card?

I did like the idea of going for Intel over AMD, and was keen on a ready built PC like the cheap eBuyer one, but I can't see any info on the PCIE slots on that.


Intel is fine. I would steer clear of the onboard route though - too resource hungry especially if you're already doing something complex like running four displays!

Just bag a motherboard with a pcie x16 and a pcie x1 slot on it. Get two low end graphics cards (Geforce 9400GT's should do the trick, plenty of power and every connection you could ever need for a reasonably cheap price). Each one has two simultaneous outputs (they have three each, a HDMI, DVI and VGA Dsub, but only two can be used at a time afaik) so just plug each display into one of your four available outputs.

Et voila. rest is simples.
#28
Anarchist;5936364
Intel is fine. I would steer clear of the onboard route though - too resource hungry especially if you're already doing something complex like running four displays!

Just bag a motherboard with a pcie x16 and a pcie x1 slot on it. Get two low end graphics cards (Geforce 9400GT's should do the trick, plenty of power and every connection you could ever need for a reasonably cheap price). Each one has two simultaneous outputs (they have three each, a HDMI, DVI and VGA Dsub, but only two can be used at a time afaik) so just plug each display into one of your four available outputs.

Et voila. rest is simples.


The only resource used when using onboard, is system memory. 256mb of it on average. You have to weigh that single loss against the cost of a crossfire/SLI motherboard and two additional graphics cards.

Just averaging here, lets say £60 for the motherboard and £40 for each graphics card. That's £140 total.

With onboard, you're looking at a £50 motherboard with a £40 graphics card. Total £90.

Now is that 256mb worth the extra £50? because that's the only difference functionally between the two.

If this were for gaming, I'd totally be going for dual graphics cards but since gaming doesn't seem to be the prime use here, onboard makes more sense financially.

I should have also added that Intel is indeed fine. I just don't know enough about the chipsets on Intel to talk about specific boards that will work with a quad display.
#29
Thanks for your advice guys, I've added some rep to you both.

I think your probably right in having a dedicated TV separate to the computer will be the best choice and will look to get one with integrated freeview so as to minimise on additional cables, boxes & system resources.

Also the 9400GT cards seem to be a cost effective solution at around £35 each. I believe I need to use both DVI & VGA on these cards so will need to get a couple of DVI to VGA converters for my existing VGA monitors.

I'm just left in deciding on the system, and that's a hard choice. I'll keep my eye on the deals coming up over the next week or so and see what pops up, but now understand that it'll need 2 x PCIE ports of some kind.
#30
Yowzer;5946180
Thanks for your advice guys, I've added some rep to you both.

I think your probably right in having a dedicated TV separate to the computer will be the best choice and will look to get one with integrated freeview so as to minimise on additional cables, boxes & system resources.

Also the 9400GT cards seem to be a cost effective solution at around £35 each. I believe I need to use both DVI & VGA on these cards so will need to get a couple of DVI to VGA converters for my existing VGA monitors.

I'm just left in deciding on the system, and that's a hard choice. I'll keep my eye on the deals coming up over the next week or so and see what pops up, but now understand that it'll need 2 x PCIE ports of some kind.




I've probably made it sound more complicated than it is. So I'll just recap for you as 2xpcie is only one option. With both options you'll need to have 4 DVI outs if you want to hook up 3 LCD monitors. 2 of those outs can be HDMI as this will convert easily to DVI with an adaptor. What you need to avoid is VGA as this is only suitable for the old big box (CRT) monitors.

Option 1
Motherboard with onboard graphics capable of working with another graphics card. This is basically SLI (for nvidia) Crossfire (AMD/ATI) only the onboard graphics is counting as one graphics card. So here you only need one pcie graphics card to plug into the motherboard.

Option 2
Actually much simpler, just get two of the same nvidia graphics cards and all you have to do is make sure that the motherboard has SLI. Without that you wont be able to connect two graphics cards. This is going to cost more but has the added benefit that the graphics will be more powerful for gaming should you ever want to play any.

Best of luck putting together a sweet PC

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