2 Eddingtons Silicone Eggshell Egg Poachers £3.74 delivered (rrp £5.99) @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Saw the Fusion Brands egg poacher deal and then found this one which is a pound cheaper and does the same thing and has the same great reviews. I love eggs benedict and these will help on the quest to make them perfect.

Description:
The Eddingtons silicone egg shell poachers are the fun and simple way to poach eggs. Simply place one or two eggs in one of the greased poaching shells, place in a pan with a low level of boiling water, put the pan lid on and in moments you have perfectly poached eggs. No fuss, no mess, no swirling water and no broken yolk's.
The silicone poachers can be used on the hob in a pan, in the microwave, are oven, freezer and dishwasher safe and being non stick are easy to clean.

Also ideal moulds for jellies, desserts, rice and baking.
Deal Tags:
More From Amazon:

All Comments

(21) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
I've got the poachpod version of these and they're not good. They're really inneficient taking about 4 times what they usually take. The eggs aren't as good as just putting them into the water either as they plasticise a bit. You can lessen this by putting a bit of boiling water in with the egg but I'd still say it's not worth it. Poached eggs are about the only things I'm really good at. And proper tidy gravy, not that granule muck.
#2
Duelling Duck
I've got the poachpod version of these and they're not good. They're really inneficient taking about 4 times what they usually take. The eggs aren't as good as just putting them into the water either as they plasticise a bit. You can lessen this by putting a bit of boiling water in with the egg but I'd still say it's not worth it. Poached eggs are about the only things I'm really good at. And proper tidy gravy, not that granule muck.


What's your gracy recipe?
1 Like #3
Get some fat and as much good juice from the meat that you can in a saucepan and then bung in flour while it's not on the heat and turn that into a paste - couple of big heaped tablespoons I'd say (do it all by eye) then get the heat on and add water slowly while heating and keep working it into the roux. I use water from the veg, taking it from each pot and topping each one up from the kettle if they need it. You've got to make sure you cook it through so that it loses the floury taste. Put in some gravy browning at some point during this and if you haven't really got enough good juice from the meat you can use a stock cube. I like my gravy fairly thick and by the bucketload, not that runny cack you get on telly shows where everyone puts a thin dribble on their yorkshire pudding and that's it. My roasties need a lifeboat. Oh, actually I make really good roast potatoes. I actually did experiments and notes for that. Then Heston Bloody Blumenthal did almost the same thing on telly. Potatoes = maris piper or arran royals, part boil in salty water, drain and shake to scuff them and have hot oil or a mixture of oil and butter waiting for them. Sometimes I heat that in a little pan separately. And I put them in at the same time or every before the meat. You can't try and force it by hoiking the temperature up because then they just seem like they're fried, it's just time that counts. They've got to be crunchy with hardly any fluffy potato left - I hate boiled potatoes. Any no, I don't mean burnt either. They're almost a deep orange colour. The pork scratching of the potato world. EDIT: Forgot to say, well I have them in the roasting tin with the meat, but if theres too much fat in there later in the cooking you want that out because the potatoes need to dry out a bit by the end and not be what's essentially shallow frying. It's alright for that earlier but not towards the end, so either remove the fat (remember to save some for gravy) or put the potatoes on a wire rack or something. If you're lucky this amazing caremelisation thing will happen on the bottom of the potato and you'll get gluey bit that just a tiny taste of will make your endorphins rush. I'm not joking.

Anyway, I can't stand sweet gravies, the sort where somebody puts veg under the meat while cooking it, even onions - that's right out. It's alright to do other things with but not gravy.

A super simple tip for not breaking yolks. I used to do it the way everybody I see does it - tap the egg to crack it then pull the egg apart and it drops through. No, tap it, turn it vertically and pull off the top bit then pour it out. Stupidly simple.

Right that's my entire repertoire. It's all boil in the bag after that.

Edited By: Duelling Duck on Dec 12, 2010 10:46: recipe update
#4
Your recipe for gravy and potatoes is exactly the same as mine. However, the only difference is that I've learnt that it's counter productive to then drown the potatoes in gravy because they quickly lose their crispiness. So I tend to pour some over the meat and stuffing in gravy but only season the potatoes. Then add as needed. That keeps the potatoes very crispy.
#5
Hate these poached egg contraptions - they just don't work! My tips for poached eggs -

1) use a fying pan (with deepish sides) - don't just PLOP your eggs in a deep saucepan of water. Gently does it.
2) Bring the water to a gentle simmer only - not a full on boil. Otherwise your eggs will just fly apart.
3) Put a splash of vinegar in your water - it really does help to stop the eggs going to bits and helps to keep multiple eggs stay seperated
4) Poach for exactly 5 minutes for a completely cooked egg with a nice thick runny yolk.
#6
i got these earlier this year, as they said they take alot longer to cook than without
#7
You can get silicone ones in Poundland for £1
#8
take A LOT longer to cook with these.

1 way to shorten the time with these i found is to pop the lid on the steam cooks them then only takes 1-2mins more than normal rather than 10mins
#9
I've never mastered poached-eggs until I got these. Perfectly done in 5 mins, I love them.
#10
These took their time to get hot
#11
had this in my basket for a few days, price goes up and down, has been 2.60 a couple of times in past week...
#12
to get a perfect egg with just water simply swirl the water, as it slows drop the egg gently in the center - 5 minutes and you have the perfect egg. None of this nonsense needed.
#13
i have the pod one (green) and they cook perrrfect eggs every time and only takes 5 minutes. I use a tiny drop of olive oil, spread it around, pop egg in then into pan, med heat, and bob's your uncle perfect runny eggs.
#14
oh yeah, and don't forget to put the lid on the pan otherwise they won't cook properly.
#15
Magic01273
Hate these poached egg contraptions - they just don't work! My tips for poached eggs -

1) use a fying pan (with deepish sides) - don't just PLOP your eggs in a deep saucepan of water. Gently does it.
2) Bring the water to a gentle simmer only - not a full on boil. Otherwise your eggs will just fly apart.
3) Put a splash of vinegar in your water - it really does help to stop the eggs going to bits and helps to keep multiple eggs stay seperated
4) Poach for exactly 5 minutes for a completely cooked egg with a nice thick runny yolk.

5 mins?!? They wont be runny after that long! 2 mins is plenty. Vinegar good tip but not too much. Tablespoon per litre
#16
I'd read the Amazon reviews, and make your own mind up, most people love these. I use both the Poachpod(green) and the vinegar and water method. I only use the Poachpods so i can do 6 at a time in the same pan easier, 2 each for my 3 family members. Greese then inside of the pod (i use butter) and, a lid on the pan is a must. The only negative side is putting them in and taking them out of boiling water with your hands, but only takes a couple off goes to get used to it. A big pan makes it easier. Not seen the poundland ones but would be worth a go if they are as good as the poachpod ones.

Edited By: middla on Dec 20, 2010 07:51: additional detail
banned#17
you people must all be doing it wrong. Much better than a saucepan method and takes the same amount of time (3 minutes). These are brilliant and no mess, perfect poached eggs & less washing up too :)

you MUST put the lid on!
#18
Other half bought some of these. What a waste of time they are. If you want poached eggs, i suggest buying the special pans. These things are just useless!! Took ages to make, took on water, hard to clean.
#19
GazTheHat
Other half bought some of these. What a waste of time they are. If you want poached eggs, i suggest buying the special pans. These things are just useless!! Took ages to make, took on water, hard to clean.

I guess some of us just have the knack, and some don't.
#20
I have to say I wasn't impressed with these either. You have to line them with oil before cracking an egg in them. They do take a long time but they are not nice and fluffy like they are in just a plain pan of water with a dash of vinegar.
#21
I love my pods really easy spray pod with fry light crack egg in pod place in boiling water the important bit but lid on pan and cook for 5 mins perfect every time.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!