2 Metre HDMI v1.1 Cable - £2.98 inc Free Next Day delivery @ CCLOnline - HotUKDeals
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HDMI 19 Pin Male to Male, 2mtr

Constructed with UL20276 cable, for use with HDMI Compatible Devices
Compliant with HDMI v1.1 Specification

Yes this cable is only v1.1 but for most people this will be more than fine... i.e upscaling DVD players.
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8y, 1m agoFound 8 years, 1 month ago
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#1
[COLOR=red]Now in stock![/COLOR]

Ebuyer has now gone up to £3.99.
#2
A HDMI cable is a HDMI cable, this will work fine with 1.3 etc
#3
HDMI?? LOL :x . This is HDMI. :whistling:
#4
trenchfever
HDMI?? LOL :x . This is HDMI. :whistling:


Definitely .... they say its worth investing in Gold at the mo lol:-D

(actually I bottled out and bought the original one at £2.98 - great buy, cheers Gary-rip)
1 Like #5
trenchfever;3194443
HDMI?? LOL :x . This is HDMI. :whistling:

lol
#6
I'm looking for 1.3 ones as all my gear is 1.3 capable and one of the cables has stopped working!
#7
Voted Cold
For HDMI check
UKHDMI
#8
I always thought any HDMI cable was compatible with 1.1 or 1.3 If not, what's the difference?
1 Like #9
voyager7
I always thought any HDMI cable was compatible with 1.1 or 1.3 If not, what's the difference?


No HDMI 1.1 cables may or may not be able to transmit HDMI 1.3 signals. I've explained a couple of times in these forums regarding attenuation on cables in repsonse to claims that "digital is digital" or "HDMI is HDMI". All matter that conducts electricity suffers from attenuation and transmitting electrical signals in the form of HDMI encoded signals is no exception. For those who claim "digital is digital", you should ask them why CRC checks can fail with CD and DVD media. After all, the analogue signals are converted to digital signals like with HDMI (the electrical signals transmitted in an HDMI cable is analogue).

Due to the neccessity to support True Colour and Dolby True HD and DTS True HD in HDMI 1.3, higher bit rates are required which means the need to reduce attenuation is even greater. Poorer grade cables will use metal that has higher resistivity and higher attenuation. The further the distance travelled, the greater the degradation in signal. For HDMI, it is required that lowere resistivity metal is used. If I use the analogy of red laser and blue laser for optical media, we all know that red laser drives cannot read discs that require a blue laser even though the conversion from analogue to digital is the same process. With HDMI cables, the issue is attenuation but with red laser v blue laser it is the wavelength required to read the pits on the discs.
#10
mwallan;3193857
A HDMI cable is a HDMI cable, this will work fine with 1.3 etc



here we go again....last time i got battered as the dumb dumbs wouldnt listen.....my turn now....i make no apologies for the insults, just returning insults from last time
it will work but i wish numptys on here would stop using the dumb statement "an HDMI cable is an HDMI cable" - they are NOT the same, they will work but you wont get the full capability with some - this applies to your av equipment too:-
clearly you obviously must know more than the bloody designers of the HDMI framework!!
anyway here is a dummies guide..courtesy of HDMI.org

Q. What functionality was added to each version of HDMI?

The following provides an overview of major functionality added to each version of HDMI:

HDMI 1.1:
[LIST]
[*]Support for DVD Audio.[/LIST]
HDMI 1.2:
Adds features and capabilities that increase HDMI's appeal for use in both the CE and PC industries. Specifically, the features and modifications for HDMI 1.2 include: Support for One Bit Audio format, such as SuperAudio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), changes to offer better support for current and future PCs with HDMI outputs, including: availability of the widely-used HDMI Type A connector for PC sources and displays with full support for PC video formats, ability for PC sources to use their native RGB color space while retaining the option to support the YCbCr CE color space, requirement for HDMI 1.2 and later displays to support future low-voltage (i.e., AC-coupled) sources, such as those based on PCI Express I/O technology.

HDMI 1.2a:
[LIST]
[*]Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features and command sets and CEC compliance tests are now fully specified.
[*]Creation of version 1.2a of the HDMI Compliance Test Specification (CTS), which includes a CEC Supplement. HDMI CTS 1.2a has been updated for technical consistency with HDMI Specification 1.2a as well as to the recently released HDMI Specification 1.2.
[*]Significantly, CTS 1.2a contains additional cable and connector testing and Authorized Testing Center (ATC) submission requirements. Specifically, under CTS 1.2a, the Adopter shall submit for testing to the ATC any new HDMI cable whose length exceeds previously tested cables.
[*]Additionally, HDMI Licensing, LLC will maintain a list of approved connectors. For a device to pass CTS 1.2a testing at an ATC, all connectors on such device must appear on the approved connector list. To add a connector to this list, the vendor must submit to the ATC or HDMI Licensing, LLC full and passing testing results.[/LIST]HDMI 1.3:
[LIST]
[*]Higher speed: HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Color and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundation that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
[*]Deep Color: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) color depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colors in unprecedented detail.
[*]Broader color space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC color standard), which removes current color space limitations and enables the display of any color viewable by the human eye.
[*]New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
[*]Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
[*]New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.[/LIST]

Q. What is the difference between a “Standard” HDMI cable and a “High-Speed” HDMI cable?
Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as Standard or High-Speed cables.
[LIST]
[*]Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal.
[*]High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).[/LIST]of course all cables are the same..lol :roll:
1 Like #11
ElliottC;3196330
No HDMI 1.1 cables may or may not be able to transmit HDMI 1.3 signals. I've explained a couple of times in these forums regarding attenuation on cables in repsonse to claims that "digital is digital" or "HDMI is HDMI". All matter that conducts electricity suffers from attenuation and transmitting electrical signals in the form of HDMI encoded signals is no exception. For those who claim "digital is digital", you should ask them why CRC checks can fail with CD and DVD media. After all, the analogue signals are converted to digital signals like with HDMI (the electrical signals transmitted in an HDMI cable is analogue).

Due to the neccessity to support True Colour and Dolby True HD and DTS True HD in HDMI 1.3, higher bit rates are required which means the need to reduce attenuation is even greater. Poorer grade cables will use metal that has higher resistivity and higher attenuation. The further the distance travelled, the greater the degradation in signal. For HDMI, it is required that lowere resistivity metal is used. If I use the analogy of red laser and blue laser for optical media, we all know that red laser drives cannot read discs that require a blue laser even though the conversion from analogue to digital is the same process. With HDMI cables, the issue is attenuation but with red laser v blue laser it is the wavelength required to read the pits on the discs.



hooray someone with intelligence of this forum....just wait for the dumb dumb "clueless" sheep to batter you.....they think because it works, it must be the same
#12
royals
it will work but i wish numptys on here would stop using the dumb statement "an HDMI cable is an HDMI cable" - they are NOT the same, they will work but you wont get the full capability with some - this applies to your av equipment too:-
clearly you obviously must know more than the bloody designers of the HDMI framework!!
anyway here is a dummies guide..courtesy of HDMI.org

Q. What functionality was added to each version of HDMI?
The following provides an overview of major functionality added to each version of HDMI:
HDMI 1.1:
[LIST]
[*]Support for DVD Audio.[/LIST]HDMI 1.2:
[LIST]
[*]Adds features and capabilities that increase HDMI's appeal for use in both the CE and PC industries. Specifically, the features and modifications for HDMI 1.2 include: Support for One Bit Audio format, such as SuperAudio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), changes to offer better support for current and future PCs with HDMI outputs, including: availability of the widely-used HDMI Type A connector for PC sources and displays with full support for PC video formats, ability for PC sources to use their native RGB color space while retaining the option to support the YCbCr CE color space, requirement for HDMI 1.2 and later displays to support future low-voltage (i.e., AC-coupled) sources, such as those based on PCI Express I/O technology.[/LIST]HDMI 1.2a:
[LIST]
[*]Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features and command sets and CEC compliance tests are now fully specified.
[*]Creation of version 1.2a of the HDMI Compliance Test Specification (CTS), which includes a CEC Supplement. HDMI CTS 1.2a has been updated for technical consistency with HDMI Specification 1.2a as well as to the recently released HDMI Specification 1.2.
[*]Significantly, CTS 1.2a contains additional cable and connector testing and Authorized Testing Center (ATC) submission requirements. Specifically, under CTS 1.2a, the Adopter shall submit for testing to the ATC any new HDMI cable whose length exceeds previously tested cables.
[*]Additionally, HDMI Licensing, LLC will maintain a list of approved connectors. For a device to pass CTS 1.2a testing at an ATC, all connectors on such device must appear on the approved connector list. To add a connector to this list, the vendor must submit to the ATC or HDMI Licensing, LLC full and passing testing results.[/LIST]HDMI 1.3:
[LIST]
[*]Higher speed: HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Color and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundation that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
[*]Deep Color: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) color depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colors in unprecedented detail.
[*]Broader color space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC color standard), which removes current color space limitations and enables the display of any color viewable by the human eye.
[*]New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
[*]Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
[*]New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.[/LIST]

Q. What is the difference between a “Standard” HDMI cable and a “High-Speed” HDMI cable?
Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as Standard or High-Speed cables.
[LIST]
[*]Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal.
[*]High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).[/LIST]
of course all cables are the same..lol :roll:



Good information. I have argued till I'm blue in the face with people how a signal that is to be converted to digital can still lose information. Everything that is transmitted via a conducting matter will lose some signal and that conducting matter will transmit an analogue signal to be decoded to a digital signal by reading the amplitude of the analogue waves. A threshold determines how large an amplitude is in order to deem that it is to be read as a binary digit 1 otherwise it will be deemed to be binary digit 0. It really is very simple and stands to reason that attenuation can cause amplitudes to degrade causing signals that are to be read as 1 to be incorrectly read as 0. So I will repeat again so people do not buy the wrong equipment that specifications are important and if a device is only certified with a certain specification, there is no guarantee that it meets the requirements of a higher specification (although that does not mean that it definitely will not meet the requirements of the higher specification).
#13
ElliottC;3196693
Good information. I have argued till I'm blue in the face with people how a signal that is to be converted to digital can still lose information. Everything that is transmitted via a conducting matter will lose some signal and that conducting matter will transmit an analogue signal to be decoded to a digital signal by reading the amplitude of the analogue waves. A threshold determines how large an amplitude is in order to deem that it is to be read as a binary digit 1 otherwise it will be deemed to be binary digit 0. It really is very simple and stands to reason that attenuation can cause amplitudes to degrade causing signals that are to be read as 1 to be incorrectly read as 0. So I will repeat again so people do not buy the wrong equipment that specifications are important and if a device is only certified with a certain specification, there is no guarantee that it meets the requirements of a higher specification (although that does not mean that it definitely will not meet the requirements of the higher specification).


same here.....i guess for some it wont make any difference what cable they buy....if they have a **** tv and **** source a decent cable wont make any difference....if anything it could make things worse by highlighting the deficiencies in their setup.....for me, i have an av setup of £5K, so scrimping by saving £10-20 on the cabling would be dafter than an investment banker getting a bonus this year, my hmdi cabling is quite long and needs to be of decent quality (goes through the walls, so i dont want to replace it!) - i use chord and qed cables which were usually £60-70 each but i got for £20-30 each......i wouldnt buy the mega expensive ones though as the benefit is so minimal that for me isnt worth the additional cost, but hey for someone who has spent £10000s on their av system it probably is.

dont worry about trying to educate people here, I have 20 years IT experience and almost 10 years telecoms experience and they still dont listen to me....my bro has alot more experience in telecoms than me and they didnt listen to him either.....

guess these people must know alot about telcoms/It that i dont know about or they work in nethernetherland after doing a late shift at Asda
#14
alchemistkevin;3195241
I'm looking for 1.3 ones as all my gear is 1.3 capable and one of the cables has stopped working!

but arent all cables the same....oh im having a party...can i say it now
" i told you so!!"
#15
So where is he cheapest 1.3 version then? I'm after a long scart lead too
banned#16
Im no expert on HDMI cables, with this cable will I get the full use of the freeview box I just bought? The screen I will be conecting it to is a Dell 2709W.
#17
tcorbyn
Im no expert on HDMI cables, with this cable will I get the full use of the freeview box I just bought? The screen I will be conecting it to is a Dell 2709W.



Yes, no problems at all as there is no requirement for HDMI 1.3 for pictures that are upscaled and have been pre and post processed. If you are using a longer cable it may be worth buying one that has signal regeneration built in. Some of the cheap longer cables may suffer from attenuation and I had to buy a booster made by Gefen to allow transmission of the signal over a 25 m cable.
#18
ElliottC
Yes, no problems at all as there is no requirement for HDMI 1.3 for pictures that are upscaled and have been pre and post processed. If you are using a longer cable it may be worth buying one that has signal regeneration built in. Some of the cheap longer cables may suffer from attenuation and I had to buy a booster made by Gefen to allow transmission of the signal over a 25 m cable.


It's an absolute pleasure to see another person (and Royals) who appreciates quality, and knows what they're on about.

Sadly your insightfulness is wasted on the droves of ****** that inhabit Hotdealsuk ... who in their desperation to save that last minuscule penny on a can of beans, now believe they're experts on Home Cinema. :thumbsup:
#19
mwallan
A HDMI cable is a HDMI cable, this will work fine with 1.3 etc


No it isnt, and no it wont.

But thanks for taking time to excerise and share your limited knowledge on the subject with us. :w00t: :w00t: :w00t:
#20
gizmouk;3198163
It's an absolute pleasure to see another person (and Royals) who appreciates quality, and knows what they're on about.

Sadly your insightfulness is wasted on the droves of ****** that inhabit Hotdealsuk ... who in their desperation to save that last minuscule penny on a can of beans, now believe they're experts on Home Cinema. :thumbsup:


lol...where can i save 1p on a tin o ***** asda smartsave beans?:-D
#21
Plexus Gold Plated HDMI to HDMI Cable (Black) 2m - Ebuyer @ £3.99...

I bought these 3 monhs ago to go with my Tosh, HDMI 1.3, and they are the 'beez neez'!
Might be a £1 extra now (were cheaper when I bought them) but you'll notice the difference and being Ebuyer, there is no issues with the stock level...Currently showing 3559 in stock and 23 reviews, all 5/5! :thumbsup:

Sorry, cant add heat but likewise will not add the chill factor either as this deal will suit some HUKDealers. :)
1 Like #22
Check out the 3 parts of the article referenced Here.

Basically, at short lengths of 2 meters you should be fine with a cheap cable, its once you start going longer theres a possibility of problems.
#23
ElliottC;3196330
No HDMI 1.1 cables may or may not be able to transmit HDMI 1.3 signals. I've explained a couple of times in these forums regarding attenuation on cables in repsonse to claims that "digital is digital" or "HDMI is HDMI". All matter that conducts electricity suffers from attenuation and transmitting electrical signals in the form of HDMI encoded signals is no exception. For those who claim "digital is digital", you should ask them why CRC checks can fail with CD and DVD media. After all, the analogue signals are converted to digital signals like with HDMI (the electrical signals transmitted in an HDMI cable is analogue).

Due to the neccessity to support True Colour and Dolby True HD and DTS True HD in HDMI 1.3, higher bit rates are required which means the need to reduce attenuation is even greater. Poorer grade cables will use metal that has higher resistivity and higher attenuation. The further the distance travelled, the greater the degradation in signal. For HDMI, it is required that lowere resistivity metal is used. If I use the analogy of red laser and blue laser for optical media, we all know that red laser drives cannot read discs that require a blue laser even though the conversion from analogue to digital is the same process. With HDMI cables, the issue is attenuation but with red laser v blue laser it is the wavelength required to read the pits on the discs.


royals;3196588
here we go again....last time i got battered as the dumb dumbs wouldnt listen.....my turn now....i make no apologies for the insults, just returning insults from last time
it will work but i wish numptys on here would stop using the dumb statement "an HDMI cable is an HDMI cable" - they are NOT the same, they will work but you wont get the full capability with some - this applies to your av equipment too:-
clearly you obviously must know more than the bloody designers of the HDMI framework!!
anyway here is a dummies guide..courtesy of HDMI.org

Q. What functionality was added to each version of HDMI?

The following provides an overview of major functionality added to each version of HDMI:

HDMI 1.1: [LIST]
[*]Support for DVD Audio.[/LIST]HDMI 1.2:
Adds features and capabilities that increase HDMI's appeal for use in both the CE and PC industries. Specifically, the features and modifications for HDMI 1.2 include: Support for One Bit Audio format, such as SuperAudio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), changes to offer better support for current and future PCs with HDMI outputs, including: availability of the widely-used HDMI Type A connector for PC sources and displays with full support for PC video formats, ability for PC sources to use their native RGB color space while retaining the option to support the YCbCr CE color space, requirement for HDMI 1.2 and later displays to support future low-voltage (i.e., AC-coupled) sources, such as those based on PCI Express I/O technology.

HDMI 1.2a: [LIST]
[*]Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features and command sets and CEC compliance tests are now fully specified.
[*]Creation of version 1.2a of the HDMI Compliance Test Specification (CTS), which includes a CEC Supplement. HDMI CTS 1.2a has been updated for technical consistency with HDMI Specification 1.2a as well as to the recently released HDMI Specification 1.2.
[*]Significantly, CTS 1.2a contains additional cable and connector testing and Authorized Testing Center (ATC) submission requirements. Specifically, under CTS 1.2a, the Adopter shall submit for testing to the ATC any new HDMI cable whose length exceeds previously tested cables.
[*]Additionally, HDMI Licensing, LLC will maintain a list of approved connectors. For a device to pass CTS 1.2a testing at an ATC, all connectors on such device must appear on the approved connector list. To add a connector to this list, the vendor must submit to the ATC or HDMI Licensing, LLC full and passing testing results.[/LIST]HDMI 1.3:[LIST]
[*]Higher speed: HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Color and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundation that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
[*]Deep Color: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) color depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colors in unprecedented detail.
[*]Broader color space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC color standard), which removes current color space limitations and enables the display of any color viewable by the human eye.
[*]New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
[*]Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
[*]New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.[/LIST]
Q. What is the difference between a “Standard” HDMI cable and a “High-Speed” HDMI cable?
Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as Standard or High-Speed cables. [LIST]
[*]Standard (or “category 1”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal.
[*]High Speed (or “category 2”) cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).[/LIST]of course all cables are the same..lol :roll:


gizmouk;3198163
It's an absolute pleasure to see another person (and Royals) who appreciates quality, and knows what they're on about.

Sadly your insightfulness is wasted on the droves of ****** that inhabit Hotdealsuk ... who in their desperation to save that last minuscule penny on a can of beans, now believe they're experts on Home Cinema. :thumbsup:



wow! you guys must be new here! I argued till I was blue the first time such an offer came around... the numpties wouldn't listen!

At least you're not getting ragged as I was and have some support as well, I guess that's why you're getting some respect in the posts here while I was almost getting verbal abuse by the other posters who had no regard for facts or figures but used their thoughts to tell us that it's all a sham.

Good on you guys :) there's some more knowledgeable people around :)
#24
Not bad, but like you say 1.1v. I picked up a 1.3 plexus hdmi cable yesterday from ebuyer, £3.99 with free delivery on offer, so might be worthwhile looking, (2m) :whistling:
#25
so is now a good time to explain to people that cheap upscaling DVD players and PVRs are quite pointless too? :)
#26
ro53ben
so is now a good time to explain to people that cheap upscaling DVD players and PVRs are quite pointless too? :)


Upscaling is pointless but upscaling with pre and/or post processing isn't. The definition of upscaling is simply extrapolating pixels from a smaller resolution to a higher resolution and this results in blockiness (it stands to reason that enlarging any digital image results in the pixels being more noticeable). Many devices that claim to upscale will do more than just that - they can pre or post process the picture by applying various algorithms such as edge detction to smoothen diagonal lines resulting in a sharper image. Manufacturers usually will not document whether an upscaling device will have pre or post processing applied though because most consumers have the belief that upscaling does this. Technically, it doesn't and the consumer needs to establish what the manufacturer actually mean by upscaling - is it simply an enlargement of the picture (which is the true definition of upscaling but also the most simple way to send the picture as a HD source) or is there pre and/or post processing involved which will cause a delay in the feed because the stream must be buffered while the processor performs various transformations before sending out the stream.
#27
Absolutely, hence CHEAP upscaling DVD players and PVRs are quite pointless :)
banned#28
Hi thanks for the reply, sorry if I am going a little off topic with this one but there seems to be alot of expers on this sort of stuff watching this thread.

Today I receved my monitor and freeview box, connected it with ANNOTHER hdmi cable I had in the house. I have now discoverd that the antena cable I got with the box is extremealy short, i was going to go and try and buy a new one to connect it with the antena but I had a brain wave... At the moment I have a COAX cable in my room where I used to connect it to my router for internet from virgin media but now I have sky so the cable is just sitting there, If I was able to find the right adaptor (ir to plug the coax into my freeview box) would I be able to get all the freeview chanels through my coax (which is the same one that goes into the sky box in other rooms) cable with much better quality than my ****** antena outside on the roof?
#29
tcorbyn
Hi thanks for the reply, sorry if I am going a little off topic with this one but there seems to be alot of expers on this sort of stuff watching this thread.

Today I receved my monitor and freeview box, connected it with ANNOTHER hdmi cable I had in the house. I have now discoverd that the antena cable I got with the box is extremealy short, i was going to go and try and buy a new one to connect it with the antena but I had a brain wave... At the moment I have a COAX cable in my room where I used to connect it to my router for internet from virgin media but now I have sky so the cable is just sitting there, If I was able to find the right adaptor (ir to plug the coax into my freeview box) would I be able to get all the freeview chanels through my coax (which is the same one that goes into the sky box in other rooms) cable with much better quality than my ****** antena outside on the roof?


You can buy UHF plugs cheaply (try Wilkinsons for example) and connect these to your coax cable. However, you mentioned that your antenna is ***** (whatever that means but I assume that it is not of a standard capable of receiving DVB signals). If that is the case you will need to upgrade your aerial.
#30
alchemistkevin;3200997

wow! you guys must be new here! I argued till I was blue the first time such an offer came around... the numpties wouldn't listen!

At least you're not getting ragged as I was and have some support as well, I guess that's why you're getting some respect in the posts here while I was almost getting verbal abuse by the other posters who had no regard for facts or figures but used their thoughts to tell us that it's all a sham.

Good on you guys :) there's some more knowledgeable people around :)


not new, me and gizmouk work in telcoms, luckily alot of these numpties dont otherwise we wouldnt even have 56k dialup by now!
#31
ro53ben;3201347
so is now a good time to explain to people that cheap upscaling DVD players and PVRs are quite pointless too? :)


yep, i have a cheapish samsung 1080p7 and a denon 1940 dvd players....the denon feels as though it will survive a nuclear holocaust, i reckon the samsung would fall apart if i coughed near it...as for pic quality the denon is awesome, the samsung is laughable!
#32
philljp;3200199
Check out the 3 parts of the article referenced Here.

Basically, at short lengths of 2 meters you should be fine with a cheap cable, its once you start going longer theres a possibility of problems.


smart price asda beans are the same as heinz ones too
#33
royals
not new, me and gizmouk work in telcoms, luckily alot of these numpties dont otherwise we wouldnt even have 56k dialup by now!


Well, that makes 3 of us, with regards to Telecoms (as I am a Software Developer for a Telecoms and Voice Processing company). One thing I want to establish is that on a recent course (involving a small amount of telephony), the instructor explained that TDM defines the protocols used for transmission on an E1 link. I am sure that is not the case and it is multiplexing several channels of telephone calls (30 channels in the UK) on a single E1 link with a timing source, although I don't understand how the timing source work. Do you or Gizmo know what it is? Surely Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) has nothing to do with the protocols as the instructor explained?

Thanks, in advance.
#34
ElliottC
Well, that makes 3 of us, with regards to Telecoms (as I am a Software Developer for a Telecoms and Voice Processing company). One thing I want to establish is that on a recent course (involving a small amount of telephony), the instructor explained that TDM defines the protocols used for transmission on an E1 link. I am sure that is not the case and it is multiplexing several channels of telephone calls (30 channels in the UK) on a single E1 link with a timing source, although I don't understand how the timing source work. Do you or Gizmo know what it is? Surely Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) has nothing to do with the protocols as the instructor explained?

Thanks, in advance.

This way OT but I think you both are correct, I believe you're talking about SDH which is a TDM protocol (which is the same as your instructor seems to have been indicating)
#35
Off topic guys!
#36
is this one suitable for the DELL 24inch? hottest deal this week.
#37
I think it is... but i let the people in the know answer for sure!
#38
ext
is this one suitable for the DELL 24inch? hottest deal this week.


It depends if you are connecting an HD source that sends a signal higher than HDMI 1.1 specification. Also, I am not sure if the monitor in question has HDMI or DVI inputs. If it has DVI and no HDMI you will need an adaptor if using an HDMI to HDMI lead otherwise you can use an HDMI to DVI lead. There are variants of DVI too and a DVI-I cable may not physically connect to a DVI-D input (as DVI-I supports 4 extra pins for analogue red, green, blue and synchronisation signals).
#39
have no idea about hdmi and the difference between 1.1 and 1.3. would this cable work on a ps3? would i be better off buying a more expensive one? would it make much difference. dont mind spending extra if it makes an impact on the picture.
#40
Oh dear another HDMI thread.

Not worth even trying to explain it all again but this cable will do everything you could currently need it to. Including 1080p Dolby True HD, DTS Master audio, the lot.

The badge of a 1.3 HDMI cable is a misnomer. The HDMI 1.3 spec is to do with the HDMI socket and not the cable. Think of it as like a PCI card in your computer, the 1.3 spec is to do with the card and nothing to do with the cable. The cable does not know if its passing audio or video or DTS or stereo. As long as the bandwith is not exceeded then the cable will work just fine. The bandwith needed to pass anything you need to pass currently is well within any current HDMI cable including this one. I find it funny that people think the cable will be able to tell the difference between a bitstreamed DTS HD MA signal and a LPCM signal and decide to just not work because its a HD bitstream signal but work for a 5.1 bitstream signal. When in reality the bandwith needed for DTS HD MA is minscule in comparison to even 720p video, which by the way a 1.1 cable can pass as its in the rules.

I will personally give you a full refund if you buy this cable and it doesn't work. I own 3 of these very cables passing DTS HD and 1080p and everything else you can think off and its fine. Im certainly not a telecoms engineer (what has that got to do with HDMI by the way?) but do have 10 years of home cinema experience and own a projector etc.)

As I said people get confused with HDMI 1.3 and think it has something to do with the cable when it does not, even some articles get it wrong.

But there's no explaining this to people on this thread and others.

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