2 Way adaptor 27p @ Sainsburys - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
487Expired

2 Way adaptor 27p @ Sainsburys

£0.27 @ Sainsbury's
2 way adaptor. Pretty basic, was reduced down from £1.09 Save 75% First post, so please let me know if anything is wrong. Read More
Jam3s Avatar
7y, 9m agoFound 7 years, 9 months ago
2 way adaptor.

Pretty basic, was reduced down from £1.09 Save 75%

First post, so please let me know if anything is wrong.
More From Sainsbury's:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
Jam3s Avatar
7y, 9m agoFound 7 years, 9 months ago
Options

All Comments

(72) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
Page:
[mod]#1
Hi
Thanks for posting. And welcome to HUKD.
It is good practice to also add the merchant and price to the title. It helps people who are just browsing through. And in my experience your post will get a few more “hot” votes.
Emmajk42 / Juliet_Bravo wrote a couple of very comprehensive and excellent guides for newcomers to HUKD here: - http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/145906/newcomers-advice-on-hotukdeals-gene/
http://www.hotukdeals.com/item/472177/new-deal-submission-form-help-and-h/showthread.php?t=472177
They are well worth taking a look at.
Again, thanks for posting, and welcome to HUKD.
Kind regards Andy
#2
Whoops, sorry. I did intend to do that. Thanks very much for adding that in for me.
James
#3
bloody handy things these, can never have enough hanging around
#4
bigweapon07
bloody handy things these, can never have enough hanging around


+1 Thanks for posting :thumbsup:
#5
I bought one, just in case ...
#6
Good price though when we had the local firestation evaluate our house for fire hazards etc they advised us against using these.
#7
fleetingmind
Good price though when we had the local firestation evaluate our house for fire hazards etc they advised us against using these.


Yep, same here, they are dangerous and should not be used.
#8
fleetingmind
Good price though when we had the local firestation evaluate our house for fire hazards etc they advised us against using these.


Yep, they're an easy way to overload a socket.
#9
waynehayes
Yep, they're an easy way to overload a socket.


the EU will ban the sale of these soon
#10
Yeah, I've also had the same, but I mainly only use it under light usage for like an hour tops. I take my to uni where there is only 2 plug sockets, and me and 4 guys with two of these all use our laptops.
#11
Doesn't matter how cheap these are, as the other guys said, these are dangerous and i'm surprised they're still on sale. Not worth the risk, just invest a little and buy a decent multi socket surge protector like a Belkin SurgeMaster which have Lifetime Product Warranty and £100,000 Connected Equipment Warranty.

Definitely would not plug laptops or expensive equipment into these, especially if they all draw a fair amount of power (multiple laptops is asking for it!).
#12
Millenix
Doesn't matter how cheap these are, as the other guys said, these are dangerous and i'm surprised they're still on sale. Not worth the risk, just invest a little and buy a decent multi socket surge protector like a Belkin SurgeMaster which have Lifetime Product Warranty and £100,000 Connected Equipment Warranty.

Definitely would not plug laptops or expensive equipment into these, especially if they all draw a fair amount of power (multiple laptops is asking for it!).


suppose ur right on that matter.

all i ever need em for is when i need to charge the good old mobile :)

got surge protectors myself so am safe :thumbsup:
#13
2 way adapters are not dangerous. They work by providing extra connections to the ring but will cause some resistance. 4 way extension adapters work in the same way. Can anybody verify that they have been advised against 4 way extension sockets that splits the electricity flow 4 ways? Why have 4 way extension sockets not been condemned as dangerous whereas safer 2 way sockets have? Also, dangerous devices would not be so freely available.

An electrical socket can take 3 kw of power which means that the 2 way adapter should be enough tom power 2 devices quite easily with total wattage of 3 kw (but subtracting a little due to resistance). Also, they are fitted with a 13A fuse so the devices connected to these cannot draw more than 13A. The message from the fire department is complete and utter rubbish unless people are hiding some detail such as "these are dangerous if connected to two 3kw heaters". As for laptops, there is absolutely no problem at all. Typical laptops operate on 20V and 5 A current giving 100W - that is way below the maximum recommended 3kw from a power socket!

Surge protectors prevent sudden surges which is different as they are used to protect connected equipment. 2 way adapters like this one are fused which has nothing to do with fire hazards.
#14
BlueSmartie
Yep, same here, they are dangerous and should not be used.


Could someone please enlighten me as to why these might be dangerous. OK if you plug a kettle or fan heater into one then you may well overload it but why would it be dangerous to plug say, a laptop and a 60w light into one?
#15
alecb
Could someone please enlighten me as to why these might be dangerous. OK if you plug a kettle or fan heater into one then you may well overload it but why would it be dangerous to plug say, a laptop and a 60w light into one?


Ignore the propaganda. A laptop and 60W light is fine - well below the max rated 3kw. They are almost certainly BS rated too for safety whether the fire dept like it or not! Oh, firemen are NOT physicists.

A loose argument can be made for sparking due to weight applied to the adapter but overloading does NOT cause a fire. Overload protection is a marketing term which means....errrm, fuse!
#16
I've always wanted a 3-way
#17
alecb
Could someone please enlighten me as to why these might be dangerous. OK if you plug a kettle or fan heater into one then you may well overload it but why would it be dangerous to plug say, a laptop and a 60w light into one?


i think its down to peoples beliefs or experiences, in normal circumstances like mobile charger in one and tv in another is ok, but 2 extensions plugged in them loaded with computer, kettle, fridge , tv etc is dangerous. my personal opinion is that they are ok for small things but the heat distribution is very minimal when they are sucking huge amounts of wattage through them, so ok to use, but if you have larger extensions then always go for these.
#18
ficosaneil
I've always wanted a 3-way


i think most people do nowadays :p
1 Like #19
Millenix
Doesn't matter how cheap these are, as the other guys said, these are dangerous and i'm surprised they're still on sale. Not worth the risk, just invest a little and buy a decent multi socket surge protector like a Belkin SurgeMaster which have Lifetime Product Warranty and £100,000 Connected Equipment Warranty.

Definitely would not plug laptops or expensive equipment into these, especially if they all draw a fair amount of power (multiple laptops is asking for it!).


Unenlightened tosh!
#20
ElliottC
2 way adapters are not dangerous. They work by providing extra connections to the ring but will cause some resistance. 4 way extension adapters work in the same way. Can anybody verify that they have been advised against 4 way extension sockets that splits the electricity flow 4 ways? Why have 4 way extension sockets not been condemned as dangerous whereas safer 2 way sockets have? Also, dangerous devices would not be so freely available.

An electrical socket can take 3 kw of power which means that the 2 way adapter should be enough tom power 2 devices quite easily with total wattage of 3 kw (but subtracting a little due to resistance). Also, they are fitted with a 13A fuse so the devices connected to these cannot draw more than 13A. The message from the fire department is complete and utter rubbish unless people are hiding some detail such as "these are dangerous if connected to two 3kw heaters". As for laptops, there is absolutely no problem at all. Typical laptops operate on 20V and 5 A current giving 100W - that is way below the maximum recommended 3kw from a power socket!

Surge protectors prevent sudden surges which is different as they are used to protect connected equipment. 2 way adapters like this one are fused which has nothing to do with fire hazards.


This will sound stupid, but are they suitable for use when a socket is too close to the ground?

I've got a decent belkin 4 way surge protector but the cable is that thick that it would be twisted badly if it was connected straight to the wall socket. I've currently got one of these to provide a top down socket as you were. Nothing else is connected into the second part of this block? Loadwise it should be fine right?
#21
Bossworld
This will sound stupid, but are they suitable for use when a socket is too close to the ground?

I've got a decent belkin 4 way surge protector but the cable is that thick that it would be twisted badly if it was connected straight to the wall socket. I've currently got one of these to provide a top down socket as you were. Nothing else is connected into the second part of this block? Loadwise it should be fine right?


No problem at all. If you connect over 3kw to your adapter the fuse will give you protection by melting. As long as you don't have heavy adapters causing the plugs to come loose it won't be a problem. However, the wires bending can indeed be a problem because it is loosening the contacts which can cause sparking. The sparks are enough to ignite a flammable object within the vicinity.
#22
In my experience this type of adapter often tends to develop bad connections and I recall in the past having found scorched ones even with relatively low loads. Like all electrical fittings though the quality can vary between excellent to downright lethal, no matter what quality standard they are marked with.

I think maybe some of the problem with them can be the mechanical loading of plugging in things like heavy transformers opposite to each other. Also in doing so you are putting very close together devices that can radiate significant amounts of heat, strip adapters allow heat to radiate more evenly and air to better circulate.

I replaced all mine with Belkin strip adapters when Ebuyer had them at something silly like £2.50 each. Then when I had our kitchen diner built I put in about twenty five double sockets, though still I find the need to use strip adapters! Too much electronic gadget junk!
#23
ElliottC
The message from the fire department is complete and utter rubbish unless people are hiding some detail such as "these are dangerous if connected to two 3kw heaters"..


IYHO ??

And smoking in bed is safe too ... :whistling:

The fire service do not have a hidden agenda to rid the world of 2 way adapters and bankrupt the shareholders of the deadly assasin manufacturers but they ARE dangerous. One of the reasons is that most are total crap and at 27p I have no doubt that this is no exception. Another reason is that a socket was not designed to take the extra weight if an adapter and two plugs and you will frequently see them half hanging out of the seocket now that is BL00DY DANGEROUS !!
#24
Firestation did a safety check at my friends house and told her to avoid these at all costs.
#25
raymcm
IYHO ??

And smoking in bed is safe too ... :whistling:

The fire service do not have a hidden agenda to rid the world of 2 way adapters and bankrupt the shareholders of the deadly assasin manufacturers but they ARE dangerous. One of the reasons is that most are total crap and at 27p I have no doubt that this is no exception. Another reason is that a socket was not designed to take the extra weight if an adapter and two plugs and you will frequently see them half hanging out of the seocket now that is BL00DY DANGEROUS !!


What has smoking in bed got to do with how much load a ring can take? I have mentioned the weight issues but the loading is not an issue. Please define a "fuse" for me.

Also who says that you have to hang it the a comnnected adapter out of the socket? Wouldn't hanging a heavy adapter to a wall plug socket offer similar issues?

Please clarify the hidden agenda of the fire service. There isn't one as far as I am aware.

Please explain the dangers in scientific terms rather than using pure conjecture. Please also explain what BS approval means.

Maybe warn people not to use a chainsaw as it could cut off one's arm or worse other bits of the body.
#26
I am not saying these are dangerous as I am not an expert, however I did believe these were no longer available to buy (for safety reasons). Also I too share the belief that they are heavily frowned on by the fire service, I seem to remember these getting a special mention on a fire safety course I once attended.

Or maybe there were just some earlier versions available in the past that were not fused???
#27
ElliottC
2 way adapters are not dangerous. They work by providing extra connections to the ring but will cause some resistance. 4 way extension adapters work in the same way. Can anybody verify that they have been advised against 4 way extension sockets that splits the electricity flow 4 ways? Why have 4 way extension sockets not been condemned as dangerous whereas safer 2 way sockets have? Also, dangerous devices would not be so freely available.

They are not generally dangerous, but they can easily lead to dangerous situations. There are a number of problems with the 2 way adapters.

a) You should never chain adapters or extension leads - and with only two outlets, it is more likely that further extensions are necessary. A 4 way extension is less likely to cause this problem - although you can of course chain them, too (again not recommended).

b) The mechanical load on the socket is twice as high, because two plugs hang off it. Any extension with a lead avoids that problem.

c) The case has to be provide both insulation and stability, which is a tough combination. Any extension cord has this problem, but you will notice that the 2 way adapters are much more brittle.

d) Never use adapters or extensions with high power devices of 10A or more (mostly space heaters and water heaters). These devices should have a dedicated socket.

So in conclusion: you can use them safely with 2 light sockets, but it is easy to use them in an unsafe way by plugging in a multi-plug or a power brick. 4 way extensions are usually the better option.
#28
VDisillusioned
In my experience this type of adapter often tends to develop bad connections and I recall in the past having found scorched ones even with relatively low loads. Like all electrical fittings though the quality can vary between excellent to downright lethal, no matter what quality standard they are marked with.

I think maybe some of the problem with them can be the mechanical loading of plugging in things like heavy transformers opposite to each other. Also in doing so you are putting very close together devices that can radiate significant amounts of heat, strip adapters allow heat to radiate more evenly and air to better circulate.

I replaced all mine with Belkin strip adapters when Ebuyer had them at something silly like £2.50 each. Then when I had our kitchen diner built I put in about twenty five double sockets, though still I find the need to use strip adapters! Too much electronic gadget junk!


Aye those are the belkin ones i've got, currently got three in the house, lord only knows where the other three i ordered went but wish I could find them!
#29
TOO-TIGHT-TO-PAY
I am not saying these are dangerous as I am not an expert, however I did believe these were no longer available to buy (for safety reasons). Also I too share the belief that they are heavily frowned on by the fire service, I seem to remember these getting a special mention on a fire safety course I once attended.

Or maybe there were just some earlier versions available in the past that were not fused???


They are dangerous when heavy adapters cause them to loosen from the wall socket but the fire service do not understand that. They condemn them due to statistical purposes as users connect heavy adapters to them. It's all down to common sense. With regards to overloading, there is NO DANGER.

You are correct in that these devices were unfused in the 60s. This could resukt in 25 Amps of the ring running through a little cable in the adapter (the cable is not thick enough) and that can generate enough heat to melt the cable and start a fire ... and hitherto, the myth has stuck.
#30
Tommy2
They are not generally dangerous, but they can easily lead to dangerous situations. There are a number of problems with the 2 way adapters.

a) You should never chain adapters or extension leads - and with only two outlets, it is more likely that further extensions are necessary. A 4 way extension is less likely to cause this problem - although you can of course chain them, too (again not recommended).

b) The mechanical load on the socket is twice as high, because two plugs hang off it. Any extension with a lead avoids that problem.

c) The case has to be provide both insulation and stability, which is a tough combination. Any extension cord has this problem, but you will notice that the 2 way adapters are much more brittle.

d) Never use adapters or extensions with high power devices of 10A or more (mostly space heaters and water heaters). These devices should have a dedicated socket.

So in conclusion: you can use them safely with 2 light sockets, but it is easy to use them in an unsafe way by plugging in a multi-plug or a power brick. 4 way extensions are usually the better option.


And that is correct! Except....
Adapters can be chained! At each point of the chain, the plug is fused!

Also, mechanical load is NOT twice as high! The mechanical load is dependent on the weight distribution of the block and the device plugged into it. As long as the combined load is < 13A the fuse will not blow and if it is > 13A the fuse will blow well before anything can ignite.
#31
alecb
Could someone please enlighten me as to why these might be dangerous. OK if you plug a kettle or fan heater into one then you may well overload it but why would it be dangerous to plug say, a laptop and a 60w light into one?


Its very simple.make sure that the plug is stable and thats it. You can't overload because that is expressly what the fuse is there for.it's disturbing that people cling on to folklore and nonsense in the face of utterly overwhelming science.
#32
DaveTaylor
Its very simple.make sure that the plug is stable and thats it. You can't overload because that is expressly what the fuse is there for.it's disturbing that people cling on to folklore and nonsense in the face of utterly overwhelming science.


Nothing wrong with unfounded beliefs, as long as there's nothing that disproves it. However, here we have a case of belief in what has been told rather than reasoned argument - including the fire service not providing a genuine reason for the statistics.

Going back to my chainsaw argument earlier, there is the possibility of a high rate of injury or even death from use of chainsaws. What percentage of this may be attributed to misuse? Does misuse (or even lack of common sense) give rise to a condemnation of the chainsaw? Even worse, should one replace an adapter plug with a standard 3 pin plug (yes I have seen cases of this happening). Should we condemn 3 pin plugs because people believe that when a transformer breaks down they can simply replace it with a standard 3 pin plug?
#33
And just to prove that those physics lessons all those years ago weren't wasted here's how to calculate whether you are anywhere near overloading the adaptor and blowing the fuse.

Add the wattage of the items that you want to plug into the adaptor eg 1000w fan heater,
60w light and 400w laptop (not sure about this as I don't have a laptop but it will be printed on the label on the underneath) which in this case adds up to 1460w. Divide by the mains voltage,
nominally 240v = 6.08 amps which is well within the 13amp load of the normal adaptor. The wattage can usually be found on a label on every electrical item.

What I have found in the past leads to overheating is when the screws that hold the cable ends in a plug become loose, the resistance is increased and we have overheating not necessarily because the load on the socket is too high. So unscrew the those plugs occasionally and make sure that the screws holding in the cables are nice and tight. Not necessary on sealed plugs I know but there are still a lot of non sealed plugs about in the average house.
1 Like #34
Thanks Jam3s, this is a good deal.

Everybody saying that they're dangerous don't have a clue what they are talking about. You can overload one of these just like you could overload a standard 4-way extension lead. But the fuse will blow before any other damage occurs unless the fuse then arcs... :whistling:
#35
ElliottC

You are correct in that these devices were unfused in the 60s. This could resukt in 25 Amps of the ring running through a little cable in the adapter (the cable is not thick enough) and that can generate enough heat to melt the cable and start a fire ... and hitherto, the myth has stuck.


Whilst it is true that all 2 way adaptors should be fused now, it is also true that a fue does NOT prevent 'arcing' if the plug happens to be incorrectly sitting in the socket.

It may be that the adaptor has been stood on by a child, accidently knocked out of place, bearing too much weight or any reason whatsoever, this can still cause arcing which can lead to a fire.

The Fire Service simply wish to minimise risk of fire in peoples homes by recommending adaptors with trailing leads and a fuse. A trailing lead adaptor is far less likely to be knocked out of the wall.

It is entirely up to each individual wether or not they want to listen to the advice.
#36
[QUOTE=raymcm]IYHO ??

And smoking in bed is safe too ... :whistling:QUOTE]

prime case of sarcasm being the lowest form of wit
#37
alecb
Could someone please enlighten me as to why these might be dangerous. OK if you plug a kettle or fan heater into one then you may well overload it but why would it be dangerous to plug say, a laptop and a 60w light into one?


OK these are dangerous because:-

The weight of the plugs and flex tend to pull them out of the sockets somewhat (or at least leave them prone to being at an angle). Whereas a single plug on a trailing multi-socket doesn't.

I've seen a 3 way plug behind my dad's telly that had done just that and burned all the socket and was very hot to the touch (We could hear it fizzing!!!).

My advice AVOID!!! 4 Way trailing sockets are only a few quid - no-one needs a house fire.

Another example below of these dreadful things:-

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/4014902/Cats-given-kiss-of-life-by-firemen.html

PS - I'm not a cat lover or anything - it was just an example of what multiplug adapters can do!
#38
neilcaldwell
OK these are dangerous because:-

The weight of the plugs and flex tend to pull them out of the sockets somewhat (or at least leave them prone to being at an angle). Whereas a single plug on a trailing multi-socket doesn't.

I've seen a 3 way plug behind my dad's telly that had done just that and burned all the socket and was very hot to the touch (We could hear it fizzing!!!).

My advice AVOID!!! 4 Way trailing sockets are only a few quid - no-one needs a house fire.

Another example below of these dreadful things:-

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/4014902/Cats-given-kiss-of-life-by-firemen.html


I can't comment on whether the plug in question was a cabled one or one using a multi way block but based on obtuse comments earlier (Dave Taylor) a multi way block can be inherently safer as there is no cable to trip on, if I was being obtuse myself.

Does the article from Telegraph mention whether this is a multi way block or an a multi way extension cable? Or in fact, could it be a Belkin (seems like there's a fascination for Belkin here) surge adapter?

This goes to emphasise the power of the press. They can argue a point with the complete antithesis of the point being made, contrary to popular belief.

Oh, example of fire service rubbish:

http://www.essortment.com/articles/home-fire-inspection_998.htm

Quote from above link: The use of extension cords and non-approved, multi-plug adapters may overload the electrical circuit capacity and has been shown to be a major cause of fire.

Mmmm, multi plug adapters are the same thing as power strips but in a more compact form. However they do mention "non-approved" though.
#39
alecb
And just to prove that those physics lessons all those years ago weren't wasted here's how to calculate whether you are anywhere near overloading the adaptor and blowing the fuse.

Add the wattage of the items that you want to plug into the adaptor eg 1000w fan heater,
60w light and 400w laptop (not sure about this as I don't have a laptop but it will be printed on the label on the underneath) which in this case adds up to 1460w. Divide by the mains voltage,
nominally 240v = 6.08 amps which is well within the 13amp load of the normal adaptor. The wattage can usually be found on a label on every electrical item.

What I have found in the past leads to overheating is when the screws that hold the cable ends in a plug become loose, the resistance is increased and we have overheating not necessarily because the load on the socket is too high. So unscrew the those plugs occasionally and make sure that the screws holding in the cables are nice and tight. Not necessary on sealed plugs I know but there are still a lot of non sealed plugs about in the average house.


And that is completely correct, lock, stock and barrel.
#40
ElliottC
I can't comment on whether the plug in question was a cabled one or one using a multi way block but based on obtuse comments earlier (Dave Taylor) a multi way block can be inherently safer as there is no cable to trip on, if I was being obtuse myself.

Does the article from Telegraph mention whether this is a multi way block or an a multi way extension cable? Or in fact, could it be a Belkin (seems like there's a fascination for Belkin here) surge adapter?

This goes to emphasise the power of the press. They can argue a point with the complete antithesis of the point being made, contrary to popular belief.

Oh, example of fire service rubbish:

http://www.essortment.com/articles/home-fire-inspection_998.htm

Quote from above link: The use of extension cords and non-approved, multi-plug adapters may overload the electrical circuit capacity and has been shown to be a major cause of fire.

Mmmm, multi plug adapters are the same thing as power strips but in a more compact form. However they do mention "non-approved" though.


You've gone a long way there to find some fire service rubbish, I think its a bit far fetched going all the way to the Portland, USA. Nothing in this country should be tarred with the same brush as with anything from over there. :)

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!