2000W Portable Oil Filled Convector Heater (3 heat settings / Integral switching/ Overheat cut-out / Thermal overload protection) £29.42 @ Screwfix - HotUKDeals
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Thermostat Control
Built-In Carry Handle
3 Heat Settings
2kW
2000W
W x D x H: 245 x 425 x 630mm
Model No: NDB-1C-20S(9fins)
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andywedge Avatar
[mod] 6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
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#1
How much an hour do these cost to run?

Thanks
#2
l33t-krew
How much an hour do these cost to run?

Thanks


2kW per hour, leccy might cost 10p per kWh (Check your tariff) so about 20p / hour going full whack. Of course it'll be less than that since the thermostat will kick in from time to time, so it really depends on how big the room is, how cold it was to begin with etc etc
#3
Got one of these n took it back thermostat warms oil up and cuts out so no chance of getting a small room warm . and worked out at 25p per hour on my tarrif
#4
These are seriously expensive to run compared to a radiator powered by a (modern) gas boiler.

Probably work out better getting a radiators plumbed into the room, it should cost that much more than this + a years worth of power.
#5
manbearpig
These are seriously expensive to run compared to a radiator powered by a (modern) gas boiler.

Probably work out better getting a radiators plumbed into the room, it should cost that much more than this + a years worth of power.


Do you know how much a plumber charges for doing this sort of job? Might be OK if going to be used a lot but for occassional heating (keep cat and dog warm in kitchen) this is ideal for me.
Voted hot and cheaper than the digital one on sale Sunday in Aldi at £34.99.
#6
cheap, am looking for one, out of stock though
#7
manbearpig
These are seriously expensive to run compared to a radiator powered by a (modern) gas boiler.

Probably work out better getting a radiators plumbed into the room, it should cost that much more than this + a years worth of power.


Well obviously, however a lot of people rent.
#8
DaveIB
Do you know how much a plumber charges for doing this sort of job? Might be OK if going to be used a lot but for occassional heating (keep cat and dog warm in kitchen) this is ideal for me.
Voted hot and cheaper than the digital one on sale Sunday in Aldi at £34.99.

Tell the cat and dog to put their coats on - oh, they have. They're designed to live outside you know!
banned#9
manbearpig

Probably work out better getting a radiators plumbed into the room, it should cost that much more than this + a years worth of power.


Are you sure? How much would a radiator cost to get installed in a room where there currently isn't one or relevant plumbing? Also anyone know how much small radiators are?

Just moved into a house and 2 rooms don't have a radiator - was considering these as a short term fix
#10
You can get an oil free one from argos, for 57p more, £29.99, oil free is more Environmentally friendly (so they claim anyway).

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/4151821/c_1/1|category_root|Limited+stock+clearance|17503661/Trail/searchtext%3EHEATER.htm

Just a suggestion for those that way inclined.
#11
DaveIB;7467620
Do you know how much a plumber charges for doing this sort of job? Might be OK if going to be used a lot but for occassional heating (keep cat and dog warm in kitchen) this is ideal for me.


Exactly the reason we recently bought one, saves heating the whole house all day while we're out to work.

If anyone has a Poundstretcher nearby, we just bought a 1500W version very similar to this and paid £17.99(it works well too, with the dial set to 3/4 it keeps our very cold, not to mention large kitchen a nice comfortable temperature), this is a good deal for everyone else though.
#12
Purchased one of these about 2 weeks ago and it has already broken! Not going to get another one no way
#13
Maybe I should buy one to keep the hamster toasty warm while Im out during the day..




:roll:
#14
carlos924
Got one of these n took it back thermostat warms oil up and cuts out so no chance of getting a small room warm . and worked out at 25p per hour on my tarrif


I got the same problem and can't get my conservatory above 55 f (even before the recent cold snap)

Thanks OP - it seems like a good deal but people should look elsewhere.
#15
You'd probably be better off getting one of these:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/DeLonghi-HVE332-3-Heater-Heat-Settings/dp/B0000C6WNX/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1262951536&sr=8-1

They are 3kw which is better than the 2kw and heat up rooms faster, plus they switch themselves off after the room has reached the desired temperature. They have good reviews too and are in stock last time i looked.

Cheers
Chris
#16
i voted this heater hot:-D
#17
Plumbing in a radiator shouldn't cost more than £100-200 + parts. So about £150-£250 ish

If there is some central heating pipe nearby it should be relatively easy for the plumber. I got a tall radiator plumbed into the kitchen which didnt have one, and was freezing cold. The radiator cost £130, and the labour was £100, which involved cutting through the back of the kitchen units, and installing the 10' copper piping along the room to the rad. The combi boiler was in the same room which made things much easier though!

I can see how some people would need this, but in the long run, installing a radiator will be much better.
#18
Erics Sardine
I got the same problem and can't get my conservatory above 55 f (even before the recent cold snap)

Thanks OP - it seems like a good deal but people should look elsewhere.


That will be because it is a conservatory that leaks heat like a sieve I would guess. We have a similar one in our old conservatory that the kids use as a playroom. This just takes off the edge of the cold so makes it bearable for daytime use. You will never heat a conservatory properly unless it is highly specced and you have a decent sized heater for the room
#19
Oil filled heaters are garbage. A convector heater does a much better job of heating a whole room.
#20
I love my oil filled radiator, got one from Lidl for £29.99 for a 2500w with a 500w fan (which i never have on) on it, its great, for just heating my bedroom wen its just me in the house, or for a boost, mine has 4 different settings on it, so u can select what output u want on it, so i usually have mine on at 1200w with the thermostat on half, heats my room well, and tbh its worth 20p per hour or whatever it costs, just to warm my room up one an evening, very useful indeed.

Heat Added
#21
FrankieHoward
Oil filled heaters are garbage. A convector heater does a much better job of heating a whole room.


+1

Heating appliances are 100% efficient no matter what device you use. You're not going to get cheaper heat from one appliance than another because

power in = power out

Convectors are smaller, cheaper (to buy) and quicker to produce heat (you don't have to wait till the oil heats up).

The only advantage i can see these having is that you have more control over the temperature of the oil e.g. you may be able to set it at 30 degrees ... rather than having a convector turn on and off at intervals to achieve an 'average' temperature.
#22
Aldi have a similar one in from tomorrow. Slightly more expensive at £34.99 but it has an LCD panel to allow you to adjust settings and set a timer.

http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/2827_12626.htm?WT.mc_id=2010-01-08-12-26
#23
manbearpig
Plumbing in a radiator shouldn't cost more than £100-200 + parts. So about £150-£250 ish

If there is some central heating pipe nearby it should be relatively easy for the plumber. I got a tall radiator plumbed into the kitchen which didnt have one, and was freezing cold. The radiator cost £130, and the labour was £100, which involved cutting through the back of the kitchen units, and installing the 10' copper piping along the room to the rad. The combi boiler was in the same room which made things much easier though!

I can see how some people would need this, but in the long run, installing a radiator will be much better.


Super.

Once i've got my radiator plumbed in, now what do I connect it to? :whistling:

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