2016 - Samsung UE49KU6400 - HDR - Active Crystal - Micro Dimming - Moth Eye TV - 1500 PQI £648.64 BT Shop - HotUKDeals
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Latest 2016 TV, only just out and £200 less than Currys and in stock at BT shop. I already have dispatch confirmation.
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alexandercooper Avatar
6m, 2w agoFound 6 months, 2 weeks ago
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(4)
15 Likes
alexandercooper
So because you have not found a review on a newly released tv, you assume it's not going to be good....lol. Look up the higher ue49ks7000 quantum dot tv and try and find reviews on that...same thing, it's to new

Skepticism
...2
a : the doctrine that true knowledge or knowledge in a particular area is uncertain
b : the method of suspended judgment, systematic doubt, or criticism characteristic of skeptics

What he is saying, is that without sufficient evidence, the quality of this TV can only be speculation. Because we are unaware whether this TV is bad, does not mean we assume it is good.
7 Likes
Can't see many reviews for this TV so I'm a bit sceptical regarding the quality of this set. Has anybody bought this model? If so, what's it like?
5 Likes
alexandercooper
So because you have not found a review on a newly released tv, you assume it's not going to be good....lol. Look up the higher ue49ks7000 quantum dot tv and try and find reviews on that...same thing, it's to new
If it's only just out presumably you haven't have a chance to review it in the flesh? And there are no on-line reviews, so you just rushed to buy something you know virtually nothing about? I bet Samsung's marketing department are laughing all the way to the bank!!

That's not to say the set isn't any good - and I hope it is - just that a little patience might have taken some of the risk out of that and maybe given a chance to get it cheaper?
5 Likes
UHD Premium is the "proper standard" by the UHD Alliance. Reading around this appears to have only a 8bit panel and 10bit is required for true UHD Premium standard. Also only a 50Hz panel.

Colour

This is the second of the most important aspects of HDR. When it comes to colour, a TV must be able to process what’s known as 10-bit or ‘deep’ colour. 10-bit colour equates to a signal that includes over a billion individual colours. In comparison, Blu-ray uses 8-bit colour, which amounts to around 16 million different colours. With 10-bit colour, HDR TVs will be able to produce a vastly expanded range of colour shades, reducing overtly obvious gradations between shades and making scenes look far more realistic.

However, as is always the case with these things, it isn’t quite as simple as this. In order to be considered HDR compatible, a TV doesn’t need to be able to display all the colours in a 10-bit signal. It just has to be able to process the signal and produce an image based on that information.

And it doesn’t stop there. If you’re still with us, there’s more colour stuff to go over. An HDR TV must be able to produce a certain amount of what’s known as ‘P3’ colour. P3 colour refers to the range of the colour spectrum which is included. The best way to think about this is imagine an overall colour spectrum, and within that a set of defined spaces. The P3 colour space is a larger than the what standard TVs use, Rec. 709, which means it covers more colours.
Essentially, HDR means a TV can cover a wider space within the colour spectrum, and within that space, the various gradations of shades will be much smoother than on current TVs.


https://forum.zwame.pt/threads/gama-samsung-2016.950370/

http://i66.tinypic.com/28vromw.png



Edited By: cecilmcroberts on May 14, 2016 12:06: adding spec comparison.

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(45) Jump to unreadPost a comment
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7 Likes #1
Can't see many reviews for this TV so I'm a bit sceptical regarding the quality of this set. Has anybody bought this model? If so, what's it like?
2 Likes #2
So because you have not found a review on a newly released tv, you assume it's not going to be good....lol. Look up the higher ue49ks7000 quantum dot tv and try and find reviews on that...same thing, it's to new

Edited By: alexandercooper on May 14, 2016 09:08
2 Likes #3
it's the 2016 entry level TV.
#4
I thought the K6000 was the entry model? This looks like a good deal to me...
banned 2 Likes #5
shahidali47
it's the 2016 entry level TV.



It's got some pretty decent specs for an entry level.
15 Likes #6
alexandercooper
So because you have not found a review on a newly released tv, you assume it's not going to be good....lol. Look up the higher ue49ks7000 quantum dot tv and try and find reviews on that...same thing, it's to new

Skepticism
...2
a : the doctrine that true knowledge or knowledge in a particular area is uncertain
b : the method of suspended judgment, systematic doubt, or criticism characteristic of skeptics

What he is saying, is that without sufficient evidence, the quality of this TV can only be speculation. Because we are unaware whether this TV is bad, does not mean we assume it is good.
1 Like #8
it's a HDR TV so it has to meet certain specifications which are higher than general 4k tvs so I'm assuming it's fairly decent
3 Likes #9
shahidali47
it's the 2016 entry level TV.


​Every TV thread has one of these 'entry level comments' lol
#10
Cheaper at a few other places. So not really a good price.
#11
will richer sounds price match?
#12
Currently fighting to return ks8000 as it doesnt do full color from a pc. Also 2 dead pixels appeared after some distortion on screen.
5 Likes #13
alexandercooper
So because you have not found a review on a newly released tv, you assume it's not going to be good....lol. Look up the higher ue49ks7000 quantum dot tv and try and find reviews on that...same thing, it's to new
If it's only just out presumably you haven't have a chance to review it in the flesh? And there are no on-line reviews, so you just rushed to buy something you know virtually nothing about? I bet Samsung's marketing department are laughing all the way to the bank!!

That's not to say the set isn't any good - and I hope it is - just that a little patience might have taken some of the risk out of that and maybe given a chance to get it cheaper?
1 Like #14
Darthballs
will richer sounds price match?
They might want to factor in the cost of their 6 year guarantee.

Edited By: captainbeaky on May 14, 2016 11:39
5 Likes #15
UHD Premium is the "proper standard" by the UHD Alliance. Reading around this appears to have only a 8bit panel and 10bit is required for true UHD Premium standard. Also only a 50Hz panel.

Colour

This is the second of the most important aspects of HDR. When it comes to colour, a TV must be able to process what’s known as 10-bit or ‘deep’ colour. 10-bit colour equates to a signal that includes over a billion individual colours. In comparison, Blu-ray uses 8-bit colour, which amounts to around 16 million different colours. With 10-bit colour, HDR TVs will be able to produce a vastly expanded range of colour shades, reducing overtly obvious gradations between shades and making scenes look far more realistic.

However, as is always the case with these things, it isn’t quite as simple as this. In order to be considered HDR compatible, a TV doesn’t need to be able to display all the colours in a 10-bit signal. It just has to be able to process the signal and produce an image based on that information.

And it doesn’t stop there. If you’re still with us, there’s more colour stuff to go over. An HDR TV must be able to produce a certain amount of what’s known as ‘P3’ colour. P3 colour refers to the range of the colour spectrum which is included. The best way to think about this is imagine an overall colour spectrum, and within that a set of defined spaces. The P3 colour space is a larger than the what standard TVs use, Rec. 709, which means it covers more colours.
Essentially, HDR means a TV can cover a wider space within the colour spectrum, and within that space, the various gradations of shades will be much smoother than on current TVs.


https://forum.zwame.pt/threads/gama-samsung-2016.950370/

http://i66.tinypic.com/28vromw.png



Edited By: cecilmcroberts on May 14, 2016 12:06: adding spec comparison.
#16
Good deal but I agree with cecilmcroberts if you want a future proof tv it has to be UHD premium certified and for best results it looks like screen size should be 55 inches and above.
#17
chrispaps12
Good deal but I agree with cecilmcroberts if you want a future proof tv it has to be UHD premium certified and for best results it looks like screen size should be 55 inches and above.

so its not very good then?
#18
cecilmcroberts
UHD Premium is the "proper standard" by the UHD Alliance. Reading around this appears to have only a 8bit panel and 10bit is required for true UHD Premium standard. Also only a 50Hz panel. Colour
This is the second of the most important aspects of HDR. When it comes to colour, a TV must be able to process what’s known as 10-bit or ‘deep’ colour. 10-bit colour equates to a signal that includes over a billion individual colours. In comparison, Blu-ray uses 8-bit colour, which amounts to around 16 million different colours. With 10-bit colour, HDR TVs will be able to produce a vastly expanded range of colour shades, reducing overtly obvious gradations between shades and making scenes look far more realistic.
However, as is always the case with these things, it isn’t quite as simple as this. In order to be considered HDR compatible, a TV doesn’t need to be able to display all the colours in a 10-bit signal. It just has to be able to process the signal and produce an image based on that information.
And it doesn’t stop there. If you’re still with us, there’s more colour stuff to go over. An HDR TV must be able to produce a certain amount of what’s known as ‘P3’ colour. P3 colour refers to the range of the colour spectrum which is included. The best way to think about this is imagine an overall colour spectrum, and within that a set of defined spaces. The P3 colour space is a larger than the what standard TVs use, Rec. 709, which means it covers more colours.
Essentially, HDR means a TV can cover a wider space within the colour spectrum, and within that space, the various gradations of shades will be much smoother than on current TVs.
https://forum.zwame.pt/threads/gama-samsung-2016.950370/http://i66.tinypic.com/28vromw.png

What I find funny is that that table has all the entries in English with exception of one (for this tv) which is in Russian (as far as I can tell) :)
#19
Nexusfifth
cecilmcroberts
UHD Premium is the "proper standard" by the UHD Alliance. Reading around this appears to have only a 8bit panel and 10bit is required for true UHD Premium standard. Also only a 50Hz panel. Colour
This is the second of the most important aspects of HDR. When it comes to colour, a TV must be able to process what’s known as 10-bit or ‘deep’ colour. 10-bit colour equates to a signal that includes over a billion individual colours. In comparison, Blu-ray uses 8-bit colour, which amounts to around 16 million different colours. With 10-bit colour, HDR TVs will be able to produce a vastly expanded range of colour shades, reducing overtly obvious gradations between shades and making scenes look far more realistic.
However, as is always the case with these things, it isn’t quite as simple as this. In order to be considered HDR compatible, a TV doesn’t need to be able to display all the colours in a 10-bit signal. It just has to be able to process the signal and produce an image based on that information.
And it doesn’t stop there. If you’re still with us, there’s more colour stuff to go over. An HDR TV must be able to produce a certain amount of what’s known as ‘P3’ colour. P3 colour refers to the range of the colour spectrum which is included. The best way to think about this is imagine an overall colour spectrum, and within that a set of defined spaces. The P3 colour space is a larger than the what standard TVs use, Rec. 709, which means it covers more colours.
Essentially, HDR means a TV can cover a wider space within the colour spectrum, and within that space, the various gradations of shades will be much smoother than on current TVs.
https://forum.zwame.pt/threads/gama-samsung-2016.950370/http://i66.tinypic.com/28vromw.png
What I find funny is that that table has all the entries in English with exception of one (for this tv) which is in Russian (as far as I can tell) :)

It was google translated. Original I believe was posted on a Polish website and that one was lifted from a Portuguese site google translated! So yeah rather confusing. Most information around the web on the tv is from Poland.
#20
Of course UHD premium is better but the cheapest Samsung uhd premium is £1200 ue49ks7000 (nearly double the price)
[helper]#22
HEAT! Brilliant price find for a real HDR compliant model ;-)

Shame it is not a few inches more, as in the 55" version as it would be just the right
price V the spec for this range.

https://i.expansys.net/i/b/b289786-1.jpg

http://i.expansys.net/img/b/289786/samsung-2016-4k-uhd-flat-smart-tv-ku6400.jpg

https://i.expansys.net/i/b/b289786-2.jpg


Edited By: 008 on May 14, 2016 14:18
1 Like #23
LOL, Samsung the TV of choice for Singletons..... These Sammys have the worst viewing angle of any manufacturer bar none.
Only purchase this if you intend to sit directly in front of it, the slightest angle and it'll be like watching TV on an Nintendo DS.
#24
008
HEAT! Brilliant price find for a real HDR compliant model ;-)
Shame it is not a few inches more, as in the 55" version as it would be just the right
price V the spec for this range.https://i.expansys.net/i/b/b289786-1.jpghttp://i.expansys.net/img/b/289786/samsung-2016-4k-uhd-flat-smart-tv-ku6400.jpghttps://i.expansys.net/i/b/b289786-2.jpg

Take it you didn't read the comments which show it is not true HDR complaint lacking a 10bit panel.
1 Like #25
nia112001
it's a HDR TV so it has to meet certain specifications which are higher than general 4k tvs so I'm assuming it's fairly decent
It's not actually a true HDR display, just to warn you and others. All proper(1000 nit+) HDR TV's by Samsung are labeled as SUHD and this one is not for a reason.

It's an ok deal but people should not be fooled by the HDR capabilities advertised.
1 Like #26
Sharpharp
LOL, Samsung the TV of choice for Singletons..... These Sammys have the worst viewing angle of any manufacturer bar none.
Only purchase this if you intend to sit directly in front of it, the slightest angle and it'll be like watching TV on an Nintendo DS.

What a load of rubbish.
#27
Horrorwood
Sharpharp
LOL, Samsung the TV of choice for Singletons..... These Sammys have the worst viewing angle of any manufacturer bar none.
Only purchase this if you intend to sit directly in front of it, the slightest angle and it'll be like watching TV on an Nintendo DS.
What a load of rubbish.

It's ok, when you buy a decent TV you'll thank me :D
#28
There's a reason these new models are cheaper than last years me thinks..
1 Like #29
More info on HDR, the panel needs to support 10 bit colour, the spec on this set states 10 bit support: N/A
http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/hdr-tv-high-dynamic-television-explained
#30
history, 8k coming in 2017, possibly last quarter of 2016
#31
TK42
More info on HDR, the panel needs to support 10 bit colour, the spec on this set states 10 bit support: N/Ahttp://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/hdr-tv-high-dynamic-television-explained

As said in post #15
2 Likes #32
by the time HDR programs come out the tv will be 10yrs + old...heck even when 4K programs become mainstream this tv will be soo old
#33
miaomiaobaubau
history, 8k coming in 2017, possibly last quarter of 2016

And we have barely any 4k content, so when are we likely to see any 8k...
2 Likes #34
cleverguy12
Can't see many reviews for this TV so I'm a bit sceptical regarding the quality of this set. Has anybody bought this model? If so, what's it like?


​I work at a TV retailer in the Southwest. We put ours out on Friday. The 55" 9000 series curved is awesome. This model at the normal retail price is mega awesome. At this price, mega mega awesome. Colour, contrast and detail are superb.
1 Like #35
3guesses
miaomiaobaubau
history, 8k coming in 2017, possibly last quarter of 2016
And we have barely any 4k content, so when are we likely to see any 8k...
enjoyed my 4k with a pc since they came out, 8k must be incredible, for the rest I prefer my old crt screen
#36
that looks like a stonking deal...i might have to pop into richer sounds for a look myself.
#38

Link shows £689


Edited By: alexandercooper on May 18, 2016 16:57
#39
it was £603.77, now its £665.15 - so not a better deal anymore.
#40
UHD Premium is the "proper standard" by the UHD Alliance. Reading around this appears to have only a 8bit panel and 10bit is required for true UHD Premium standard. Also only a 50Hz panel. Colour
This is the second of the most important aspects of HDR. When it comes to colour, a TV must be able to process what’s known as 10-bit or ‘deep’ colour. 10-bit colour equates to a signal that includes over a billion individual colours. In comparison, Blu-ray uses 8-bit colour, which amounts to around 16 million different colours. With 10-bit colour, HDR TVs will be able to produce a vastly expanded range of colour shades, reducing overtly obvious gradations between shades and making scenes look far more realistic.
However, as is always the case with these things, it isn’t quite as simple as this. In order to be considered HDR compatible, a TV doesn’t need to be able to display all the colours in a 10-bit signal. It just has to be able to process the signal and produce an image based on that information.
And it doesn’t stop there. If you’re still with us, there’s more colour stuff to go over. An HDR TV must be able to produce a certain amount of what’s known as ‘P3’ colour. P3 colour refers to the range of the colour spectrum which is included. The best way to think about this is imagine an overall colour spectrum, and within that a set of defined spaces. The P3 colour space is a larger than the what standard TVs use, Rec. 709, which means it covers more colours.
Essentially, HDR means a TV can cover a wider space within the colour spectrum, and within that space, the various gradations of shades will be much smoother than on current TVs.
https://forum.zwame.pt/threads/gama-samsung-2016.950370/http://i66.tinypic.com/28vromw.png

Very useful chart, 8-bit 50hz panel is definite no no for me.

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