2016 SPECIALIZED TURBO ELECTRIC HYBRID BIKEFree Delivery from Rutlandcycling.com - £1499.99 - HotUKDeals
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2016 SPECIALIZED TURBO ELECTRIC HYBRID BIKEFree Delivery from Rutlandcycling.com - £1,499.99

£1499.99 @ Rutland Cycling
XL SIZE ONLY Clean. Fast. Efficient. There aren't many better ways to get about than the Specialized Turbo. With its direct drive pedal assist motor, neatly integrated battery, and quality components… Read More
mcflymarty Avatar
7m, 1w agoFound 7 months, 1 week ago
XL SIZE ONLY
Clean. Fast. Efficient. There aren't many better ways to get about than the Specialized Turbo. With its direct drive pedal assist motor, neatly integrated battery, and quality components, its the ideal companion for the city.

Intuitive power assist helps you ride further than you thought possible and while it won't flatten the climbs it certainly feels that way as you glide uphill with ease. Even when fully loaded with panniers full of shopping, the Turbo helps ease the burden and helps maintain an effective pace through the city.

A wireless control panel provides all the usual features including battery life and power output options. The unique advantage of the Specialized Turbo is their Mission Control App that controls the power assist based on the route input so you always have enough juice for the whole trip with customised power output based on the gradient.

Sram's 10 speed drivetrain helps to get the most out of the high quality 468Wh Li-Ion Battery and provides a wide range of gears that can power you up even the steepest climb with the motor's assistance. Powerful Formula hydraulic disc brakes ensure reliable stopping power in all weather conditions.

Direct Drive Hub Motor Provides Efficient Power BoostHigh Quality 468Wh Li-Ion Battery Combines a Long Life With Rapid Charging TimesMission Control App Allows Custom Control Over the Turbo Motor
More From Rutland Cycling:
mcflymarty Avatar
7m, 1w agoFound 7 months, 1 week ago
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3 Likes #1
Hot, but it`s going to get stolen if left anywhere
#2
could buy a moped for that price oO
#3
Specialized always make the nicest looking bikes.
1 Like #4
jasee
Hot, but it`s going to get stolen if left anywhere

That's true of any half decent bike, even if it's not electric.
#5
OOS
#6
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
#7
Nice bike. But it looks like the battery is not easily removable.
#8
i have one of these for work and its a quality bike. the battery locks into the frame to stop anyone nicking it. it is quite heavy but you dont notice it. Unfortunately limited to assistance up to 15 mph under uk law unless you can get it unrestricted..
1 Like #9
stfc67
i have one of these for work and its a quality bike. the battery locks into the frame to stop anyone nicking it. it is quite heavy but you dont notice it. Unfortunately limited to assistance up to 15 mph under uk law unless you can get it unrestricted..
But you pedal faster than that on the flat anyway?
#10
tek-monkey
stfc67
i have one of these for work and its a quality bike. the battery locks into the frame to stop anyone nicking it. it is quite heavy but you dont notice it. Unfortunately limited to assistance up to 15 mph under uk law unless you can get it unrestricted..
But you pedal faster than that on the flat anyway?


So at 15pmh it becomes a very heavy bike
1 Like #11
tek-monkey
stfc67
i have one of these for work and its a quality bike. the battery locks into the frame to stop anyone nicking it. it is quite heavy but you dont notice it. Unfortunately limited to assistance up to 15 mph under uk law unless you can get it unrestricted..
But you pedal faster than that on the flat anyway?


true and it doesn't take long to get to that speed tbh. You can go faster but 15 mph up hill is pretty good. I have one because i have a knackered knee from a football injury and it allows me to keep cycling to work daily.
1 Like #12
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.

Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.

I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.

Edited By: plewis00 on Dec 09, 2016 08:15
#13
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
My thoughts entirely, and I think most cyclists would agree - the whole point is the effort (and seeing if you can stand the pain!).
I suppose there might be a few commuters who would see this as a greener way of getting to the station (but there is someone, somewhere burning some coal to make the electricity that comes out of the charger) - however I can't see a bike as attractive as this still being in the station bike rack when that commuter returns in the evening for long.
I'm still struggling to see a market for this, the technology looks lovely but to me it just looks like a lot of money for a really heavy bike.

Edited By: othen on Dec 09, 2016 08:32
2 Likes #14
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.

Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.

I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.


I do like cycling. i have 3 other bikes too but found the force needed to cycle up 2 huge hills on way to/from work and the effect on my knee was impacting on my other hobbies eg, surfing and running. As i am now ageing i decided to take the plunge so i could continue with these to a decent level. i accept that they are not for everyone but are an alternative for some.
#15
othen
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
My thoughts entirely, and I think most cyclists would agree - the whole point is the effort (and seeing if you can stand the pain!).
I suppose there might be a few commuters who would see this as a greener way of getting to the station (but there is someone, somewhere burning some coal to make the electricity that comes out of the charger) - however I can't see a bike as attractive as this still being in the station bike rack when that commuter returns in the evening for long.
I'm still struggling to see a market for this, the technology looks lovely but to me it just looks like a lot of money for a really heavy bike.

Yes, I completely forgot about commuters that might want to lock it in a station - where our offices are it's a closed business park so bikes seem relatively safe (that was part of why we chose that location). I was thinking about riding in a loop on a social ride so you're either on it or nearby at a cafe, for example.
1 Like #16
plewis00
othen
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
My thoughts entirely, and I think most cyclists would agree - the whole point is the effort (and seeing if you can stand the pain!).
I suppose there might be a few commuters who would see this as a greener way of getting to the station (but there is someone, somewhere burning some coal to make the electricity that comes out of the charger) - however I can't see a bike as attractive as this still being in the station bike rack when that commuter returns in the evening for long.
I'm still struggling to see a market for this, the technology looks lovely but to me it just looks like a lot of money for a really heavy bike.
Yes, I completely forgot about commuters that might want to lock it in a station - where our offices are it's a closed business park so bikes seem relatively safe (that was part of why we chose that location). I was thinking about riding in a loop on a social ride so you're either on it or nearby at a cafe, for example.
Strange -it had not occurred to me that someone would use this for a social ride with their mates. If someone turned up on an electric bike with a group of cyclists I think they would be the subject of some derision, and indeed it is hard to see the difference between this and a moped in that context.
#17
plewis00
othen
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
My thoughts entirely, and I think most cyclists would agree - the whole point is the effort (and seeing if you can stand the pain!).
I suppose there might be a few commuters who would see this as a greener way of getting to the station (but there is someone, somewhere burning some coal to make the electricity that comes out of the charger) - however I can't see a bike as attractive as this still being in the station bike rack when that commuter returns in the evening for long.
I'm still struggling to see a market for this, the technology looks lovely but to me it just looks like a lot of money for a really heavy bike.

Yes, I completely forgot about commuters that might want to lock it in a station - where our offices are it's a closed business park so bikes seem relatively safe (that was part of why we chose that location). I was thinking about riding in a loop on a social ride so you're either on it or nearby at a cafe, for example.


I wouldn't dream of leaving mine anywhere public for a length of time. I'm lucky enough to have a bike locker at work away from prying eyes but appreciate not everyone has that option. Had my garage burgled last nov and my £1500 mountain bike nicked. More cautious than ever now..
#18
plewis00
othen
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
My thoughts entirely, and I think most cyclists would agree - the whole point is the effort (and seeing if you can stand the pain!).
I suppose there might be a few commuters who would see this as a greener way of getting to the station (but there is someone, somewhere burning some coal to make the electricity that comes out of the charger) - however I can't see a bike as attractive as this still being in the station bike rack when that commuter returns in the evening for long.
I'm still struggling to see a market for this, the technology looks lovely but to me it just looks like a lot of money for a really heavy bike.

Yes, I completely forgot about commuters that might want to lock it in a station - where our offices are it's a closed business park so bikes seem relatively safe (that was part of why we chose that location). I was thinking about riding in a loop on a social ride so you're either on it or nearby at a cafe, for example.


As well as outside, my station has cycle hoops on a disused platform, beyond the barriers so whilst not unstealable, it does mean someone can't just drive up in a van, jump out with heavy duty bolt croppers and whisk it away in mins. Decent locks will mean it's secure.

I use a cycle locker at my workplace anyway, but despite the hills not yet in the market for one of these, but best looking electric I've seen.
1 Like #19
Myself and my husband use electric assisted bikes for leisure rides and we know lots of others who do the same! I live in a hilly area in Lancashire and if it weren't for my electric bike, I doubt I would ever cycle locally which would be an awful shame with the lovely countryside that we have. Although the assist is limited to 15mph, I can easily reach speeds of 25mph on the flat and up to 30mph downhill so although yes, the bike is heavy, your pedal power and it's own momentum will take you well in excess of the electric assist limits. If anyone wants anymore information a good source is the pedelec forum.
#20
I was in shropshire recently and used a Trek e-bike and my mate has the full suspension specialized levo e-bike. We managed 30+ miles, 3000ft+ elevation and a good few descents. There's no way we would have got as many downhills in or covered the same miles without the assistance. For casual cyclists they make perfect sense. He is a fit lad and has several other non e-bikes as well but sees them for what they are which are great tools.

Also with this specialized using a Brose drive unit it can be de-restricted* with a dongle or you can do it yourself for free via bluetooth from your phone by tricking the computer into thinking the wheel is half the size it really is. Obviously throws off the speed on the phone app.

*disclaimer I do not condone breaking the law and riding this derestricted on a public highway
#21
I wish I could afford this...
1 Like #22
There are many electric bikes in the £1000 and just under range which are perfectly acceptable as machines for either commuting or leisure riding. My husband has a 21 gear pedal assisted electric bike that he got new for a tad over £700 a year ago now. We ride every week in Summer and neither his nor my 6 gear £989 bike have put a foot wrong. Some research has shown that electric bikes are used much more often than normal bikes, which often end up gathering dust in the garage because not everyone loves the pain of cycling up hills without some gentle assistance!

Edited By: Boltonlass on Dec 09, 2016 11:38
1 Like #23
Electric bikes are amazing for speeding up a hilly commute to work.
1 Like #24
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.
I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.
Its different because A) you do actually get some exercise - cycling on a static bike or on the flat is recommended for my condition but cycling up hills is not - I have a genetic collagen disorder which means my joints can sublux. I cycled to and from work for a long time.. but am currently unable to cycle due to joint issues. I'm hoping if I can afford a decent electric bike I will be able to cycle again, without the worry of doing myself damage.
B) it's different from a scooter because.... don't you need a license for a scooter or moped?? and insurance?? you don't need either for an electric bike.
If they weren't so expensive I'd already have one... would provide a valuable back up transport for work too. Just hope they start to come down in price at some point
2 Likes #25
stfc67
plewis00
othen
This is a 22Kg bike, so if the battery is flat it is going to be a bit of a lump to pedal around.
I suppose there must be a market for this, but I'm trying to imagine what it might be. Serious cyclists won't be interested because pedaling is the important bit.
Oh I have had this same conversation with a 'casual cyclist' who actually argued that using one of these was fair game on Strava because I 'cheat' by using aerodynamics and weighing less... but there are people who want this kind of tech so they can enjoy cycling but without the strain on hills, so there is a market. The same people are generally also those that won't push 15mph on flats (because above 15 you do generally need moderate effort even on flats). As to the weight, weight is only a factor on inclines (in theory). It's an interesting prospect but for me, I don't get it, it's kind of 'a bicycle for people who don't actually like cycling' - I question how it differs to a motorbike or scooter when you peel the layers back.

I also wanted to add that I don't instantly assume anyone with one of these is a lazy non-cyclist; as the above poster, there are people less able that can benefit from this with perfectly valid reason.

I do like cycling. i have 3 other bikes too but found the force needed to cycle up 2 huge hills on way to/from work and the effect on my knee was impacting on my other hobbies eg, surfing and running. As i am now ageing i decided to take the plunge so i could continue with these to a decent level. i accept that they are not for everyone but are an alternative for some.
Similar to you... I hope to be able to get an electric bike so I can safely return to cycling. People who don't have joint issues rarely get it. (to put it into perspective on some days I can't stand to do the washing up without being in pain). And I'm not even that old!

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