2600 mAh Powerbank £6.99 @ Aldi from 7th August - HotUKDeals
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2600 mAh Powerbank £6.99 @ Aldi from 7th August

SoupDragon1 Avatar
2y, 4m agoFound 2 years, 4 months ago
Handy power reserve when your mobile or tablet goes dead
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#1
Saw this a few minutes ago, what are the odds it'll work with an Iphone 5C?
1 Like #2
mocmocamoc
Saw this a few minutes ago, what are the odds it'll work with an Iphone 5C?

It has a USB socket for charging... So quite likely
#3
2 Likes #4
I bought a 3200mAh one from Amazon. It charged my Samsung S3 a couple of times. They are quite heavy for the size though. Lipstick sized, but not quite pocketable.
You'll end up looking like the bassist from Spinal Tap.
#5
mocmocamoc
Saw this a few minutes ago, what are the odds it'll work with an Iphone 5C?

You'd need to check the output of the Powerbank, as against the iPhone requirement.
#6
poundland do a shorter cable
#7
These might be ok for this price.....a short time ago on groupon these were more money.....if you can get to a power supply and charge them before you travel etc....could top your phone up....if not get the solar powered type, these charge up from the mains , or the daylight.....but larger......Hot from me......but not the pink one.....lol........they say there are 4 colours..
1 Like #8
Aldi are the best in the world at what they do.
#9
ooooh!!! a good deal if ever i saw one!!!
1 Like #10
Please make sure you check the voltage on these, I bought a 5.3V one (didn't look like this), and used it for a year but always wondered why it would get my iphone to 96% but never 100% and battery life was decreasing faster than it should. After speaking to a lecturer at uni it turns out it's likely the charger was overvolting the battery and causing damage. Luckily it was an iPhone so I just bought a new battery and replaced it. If I had a htc one I think I would have cried. I thought phones had protection against that sort of thing but apparently not... Now I have a 5v anker everything's fine!

I don't know much about electrochemistry or engineering but just going off what the lecturer told me and thought I'd pass it on.
1 Like #11
leelukehope
Please make sure you check the voltage on these, I bought a 5.3V one (didn't look like this), and used it for a year but always wondered why it would get my iphone to 96% but never 100% and battery life was decreasing faster than it should. After speaking to a lecturer at uni it turns out it's likely the charger was overvolting the battery and causing damage. Luckily it was an iPhone so I just bought a new battery and replaced it. If I had a htc one I think I would have cried. I thought phones had protection against that sort of thing but apparently not... Now I have a 5v anker everything's fine!

I don't know much about electrochemistry or engineering but just going off what the lecturer told me and thought I'd pass it on.

Under load (charging) the voltage is going to drop slightly and would then most likely be well within the USB voltage spec of 4.75-5.25v. This slight over-voltage is very unlikely to have any significant negative effect on the cells it is charging IMHO.
#12
Looks ok, poss worth a punt at £7
#13
Leftfield_2k2
leelukehope
Please make sure you check the voltage on these, I bought a 5.3V one (didn't look like this), and used it for a year but always wondered why it would get my iphone to 96% but never 100% and battery life was decreasing faster than it should. After speaking to a lecturer at uni it turns out it's likely the charger was overvolting the battery and causing damage. Luckily it was an iPhone so I just bought a new battery and replaced it. If I had a htc one I think I would have cried. I thought phones had protection against that sort of thing but apparently not... Now I have a 5v anker everything's fine!

I don't know much about electrochemistry or engineering but just going off what the lecturer told me and thought I'd pass it on.

Under load (charging) the voltage is going to drop slightly and would then most likely be well within the USB voltage spec of 4.75-5.25v. This slight over-voltage is very unlikely to have any significant negative effect on the cells it is charging IMHO.

Yeah that's what I thought but then my blackberry and a couple other phones I used it with wouldn't charge from it, only my iphone. The cable it was supplied was the ones with the various tips witch may have been cheaply made so they increased the voltage to allow for the resistance that would cause a voltage drop. I lost that cable and had to use the USB cable that came with the phone. I've pinned the blame on the charger solely because every other portable charger I've used is 5V and they never had those problems. Depends whether the 5.3V printed was the under load or not under load voltage I suppose. It wasn't a that well known brand really so they might have just stuck any old voltage on there I suppose lol.
#14
leelukehope
Please make sure you check the voltage on these, I bought a 5.3V one (didn't look like this), and used it for a year but always wondered why it would get my iphone to 96% but never 100% and battery life was decreasing faster than it should. After speaking to a lecturer at uni it turns out it's likely the charger was overvolting the battery and causing damage. Luckily it was an iPhone so I just bought a new battery and replaced it. If I had a htc one I think I would have cried. I thought phones had protection against that sort of thing but apparently not... Now I have a 5v anker everything's fine!

I don't know much about electrochemistry or engineering but just going off what the lecturer told me and thought I'd pass it on.


Just FYI - all batteries lose life/charge. Over time the performance drops.
#15
Ahhh I thought the 5.3v was what you tested with a multi-meter!!
In that case it could well have been much higher than 5.3v which would almost certainly damage cells over time.

I always recommend people research both portable battery chargers and PSU's as the difference between a decent one and a naff one is significant and can in some cases effect your cells. Also it's better to trickle charge (low current) your cells over-night as this will significantly prolong the life of them :-)
#16
Does have the air of a discreet "female pleasure accessory" about it there, mind...
#17
its cheap enough, but its hardly a power bank. My phone is 3000MH, that would not charge it one time... for me, I would get something in the 10,000MH+, but at that price its fine.
1 Like #18
Aldi had 13000mah ones last week for 14.99.juat looked very cheap and nasty so I steered clear
#19
mushypeas205
leelukehope
Please make sure you check the voltage on these, I bought a 5.3V one (didn't look like this), and used it for a year but always wondered why it would get my iphone to 96% but never 100% and battery life was decreasing faster than it should. After speaking to a lecturer at uni it turns out it's likely the charger was overvolting the battery and causing damage. Luckily it was an iPhone so I just bought a new battery and replaced it. If I had a htc one I think I would have cried. I thought phones had protection against that sort of thing but apparently not... Now I have a 5v anker everything's fine!

I don't know much about electrochemistry or engineering but just going off what the lecturer told me and thought I'd pass it on.

Just FYI - all batteries lose life/charge. Over time the performance drops.

Lol yes, I understand that, lithium based batteries lose about 10% of their capacity per year. Though to be honest i wouldn't say it's actual performance drops (other than the diminishing capacity).
#20
I have one of these USB charges http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/301223479712?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&var=600275172448&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT it takes 4aa batteries, I use a set of Duracell rechargeable 2500mah battery's, giving me a total of 10,000mah, use it for camping trips etc and get several charges of my mobile phone and MP3 player.


Edited By: POWYSWALES on Aug 04, 2014 09:09
#21
Not sure about this. My Wife's Niece got one from eBay for a £3(ish) and works great for her. Quick search on there show them around this price point (one e.g. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291204480486).
#22
Max-Power
Not sure about this. My Wife's Niece got one from eBay for a £3(ish) and works great for her. Quick search on there show them around this price point (one e.g. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291204480486).

They also have these which take 2 AA batteries, http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Portable-AA-External-Battery-USB-Charger-Power-Bank-Case-For-Cell-Phone-/291172369055?pt=UK_MobilePhones_MobilePhonesCasesPouches&var=&hash=item43cb39c29f
or for another 40p you can get one that takes 4 x AA for more device chargers http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4XAA-Portable-USB-Emergency-Backup-Power-Bank-DIY-Charger-Box-For-Cell-Phone-/301223479712?pt=UK_MobilePhones_MobilePhonesCasesPouches&var=&hash=item46225189a0


Edited By: POWYSWALES on Aug 04, 2014 09:41: link
#23
POWYSWALES
Max-Power
Not sure about this. My Wife's Niece got one from eBay for a £3(ish) and works great for her. Quick search on there show them around this price point (one e.g. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291204480486).

They also have these which take 2 AA batteries, http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Portable-AA-External-Battery-USB-Charger-Power-Bank-Case-For-Cell-Phone-/291172369055?pt=UK_MobilePhones_MobilePhonesCasesPouches&var=&hash=item43cb39c29f or for another 40p you can get one that takes 4 x AA for more device chargers

I thought Lithium ion ones are better to have than re-chargeable ones..?
#24
a 2600mah would only charge an iphone once before needing a recharge
#25
Will have to set my alarm
#26
bought a couple yesterday
Tested and ,works well on my HTC
,Takes a while to charge you must be patient and wait until red light goes off only,downside took 5 hours to charge
#27
This use 2600mah Samsung 18650 cell I believe. for the price i would recommend it. but I would rather spend 3 pounds more for the Anker one when it's on promotion:D Not that we have time machine though

Edited By: demol3 on Aug 09, 2014 12:48
#28
SoupDragon1
bought a couple yesterday
Tested and ,works well on my HTC
,Takes a while to charge you must be patient and wait until red light goes off only,downside took 5 hours to charge


That's a bad buy in my books
#29
POWYSWALES
I use a set of Duracell rechargeable 2500mah battery's, giving me a total of 10,000mah, use it for camping trips etc and get several charges of my mobile phone and MP3 player.
Hi Powyswales,
sorry, but you must be wrong. To get 5V out of the box, you need to use 4 batteries. If I'm right, the batteries are in a parallel circuit. So, unfortunately, the capacity is not added:
1,2V * 2500 mAh = 3 Wh is the energy you get out of one battery.
4,8V * 2500 mAh = 12 Wh makes sense for 4 batteries.
4,8V * 10000 mAh = 48 Wh would be your calculation. So you would get 16 times the energy out of 4 batteries. Unfortunately this is just a dream, imagine taking 1000 batteries... :-)

ragUK
#30
I wanted to charge my Samsung Galaxy S5 using the Maxtec mobile charger (2600mA/h). But instead of charging my battery, the battery life is going down instead of going up. Can you help me?

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