3 year guarantee included at no extra cost on MacBooks @ John Lewis - HotUKDeals
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3 year guarantee included at no extra cost on MacBook Air & MacBook Pro.
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SesameStreetKid Avatar
3y, 4w agoFound 3 years, 4 weeks ago
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Comments/page:
#1
Will JL price match the education discount?
#2
I don't think this is for the oct 2013 retina models
1 Like #3
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.
#4
The thing that confuses me about the JL 'guarantee' is that I thought many manufacturers (at least big ones like Samsung, Sony, Apple, Microsoft - the ones that people seems to price match for most on here) give a guarantee anyway? Or isn't there even some kind of Trading Standards thingy where companies are responsible for the product for 5-10 years or something along those lines?

Added to that, don't JL normally give three year guarantees on things like this? So where's the deal? If someone could clear up my confusion/ignorance I'd be much obliged
#5
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.
I went through that route but I also got money off because of Black Friday. Phoned to get a refund for the difference they said no and I said cancel my order then surprisingly a supervisor came onto the phone and agreed. So i got my macbook pro for a very cheap price !
#6
herrbz
The thing that confuses me about the JL 'guarantee' is that I thought many manufacturers (at least big ones like Samsung, Sony, Apple, Microsoft - the ones that people seems to price match for most on here) give a guarantee anyway? Or isn't there even some kind of Trading Standards thingy where companies are responsible for the product for 5-10 years or something along those lines?

Added to that, don't JL normally give three year guarantees on things like this? So where's the deal? If someone could clear up my confusion/ignorance I'd be much obliged

Apple offer a one year warranty on their products. This can be extended to three years by purchasing AppleCare (£199+ dependent on model). Education purchases have a three year warranty included. John Lewis offers a minimum of two years warranty on laptops. So you are getting an extra year just now.

Besides the above you have statutory rights under that Sales of Goods Act. A consumer can make a claim within six years of the sale date (five years from discovery of fault in Scotland) if reasonable eg. if the soles of your shoes fall off after three years then you're not going to have much luck (wear and tear) but if a fridge fails after three years then you have a better chance as it's realistic to expect a fridge to last longer than that. There's also EU wide law which covers you for two years. Last year Apple had a battle with Italy for not making it clear that consumers were covered for two years as standard, instead selling AppleCare. I think in the UK the SOGA makes the EU warranty a bit redundant as you are already covered for at least two years.

It's worth noting that after six months the onus is on the consumer to prove that the item became faulty due to a manufacturing defect. This could be difficult and is presumably why Apple manages to charge so much for AppleCare and why John Lewis offering a free three year warranty is considered a hot deal.
#7
Theres absolutely no way a £1500 New Macbook Pro breaking before 3 years of use would be considered a reasonable length of time by EU law. If it is looked after in a reasonable manner, ie not thrown around and dropped, a fault developing at 13 months is not, (in my view at least), a reasonable length of time. I would personally expect a £2k machine to last at least 4-5 years before the technology and specs and not the build quality start to kiss its ass goodbye.

I think a complete overhaul of this additional warranty selling scene is required to stop retailers and manufacturers pretending they don't have obligations to assist when legitimate problems develop. First of all it misleads customers into spending more money than they may need to at the point of sale to give them 'peace of mind', and secondly it suggests to all those customers who didn't take the additional cover that they aren't protected when a problem develops after 14 months when in fact they most likely are.

I do however accept that some warranty packages have extra services such as quicker repair turnaround, clearly these are subjective benefits and are not considered in the rant above.
1 Like #8
Does the 3 year warranty cover the fact that an iPad will/could be almost considered useless before that period? Just considering my original iPad that now can't cope or is allowed to update to newer standards. Could it in theory be considered not fit for purpose now?
Given some heat as I'm not saying an extra year is not good, just asking a personal question.
#9
AndynAnge
Does the 3 year warranty cover the fact that an iPad will/could be almost considered useless before that period? Just considering my original iPad that now can't cope or is allowed to update to newer standards. Could it in theory be considered not fit for purpose now?
Given some heat as I'm not saying an extra year is not good, just asking a personal question.



I have to tell ipad 1 users daily that they are out of luck when trying to use our apps. Apple make it impossible to have 2 apps one for old and one for new devices for a reason. Next up is the ipad 2 slowly becoming nothing but crashing apps and headaches for ipad app developers
#10
If it's applecare cover it's well worth it. My mid 2010 macbook pro developed a fault, took it into local authorised apple service centre who replaced the entire logic board (motherboard) no questions asked for free under warranty within 2 days. I've never had an easier time getting anything repaired.
#11
The major problem here chaps is that after the first year the warranty resides with John Lewis, with applecare you get 3 years warranty with apple which is a damn site better than 1 with apple and 2 with John Lewis. JL outsource their IT repairs to third parties and I can guarantee they don't use apple authorised repair houses and likely not even apple approved parts (it needs a new hard drive, here's one put this in, rather than which model so I can order the right one etc)
2 Likes #12
knack
I think in the UK the SOGA makes the EU warranty a bit redundant as you are already covered for at least two years.

It's worth noting that after six months the onus is on the consumer to prove that the item became faulty due to a manufacturing defect. This could be difficult and is presumably why Apple manages to charge so much for AppleCare and why John Lewis offering a free three year warranty is considered a hot deal.

The EU directive of 1999 relates to a guarantee only, not a warranty, so its implementation into the existing SoGA was pretty much marginal at best. The existence of a '2 year warranty by EU law' is one of the most misreported items ever and it still gets trotted out on this an other forums. It just does not exist. Italy and other countries may have more stringent existing domestic consumer laws but you cannot extrapolate from what happens in Italy to apply the the UK or vice versa.

The EU directive mirrored the UK's SoGA in most aspects, including shifting the onus onto the purchaser after six months after purchase to prove the faults were inherent in the item at the time of purchase. A warranty is, therefore, definitely worth having.
1 Like #13
emodan
AndynAnge
Does the 3 year warranty cover the fact that an iPad will/could be almost considered useless before that period? Just considering my original iPad that now can't cope or is allowed to update to newer standards. Could it in theory be considered not fit for purpose now?
Given some heat as I'm not saying an extra year is not good, just asking a personal question.



I have to tell ipad 1 users daily that they are out of luck when trying to use our apps. Apple make it impossible to have 2 apps one for old and one for new devices for a reason. Next up is the ipad 2 slowly becoming nothing but crashing apps and headaches for ipad app developers

Uh huh?

http://i.imgur.com/SIGHyKE.png
#14
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?


I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.


No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...
1 Like #15
fitaap05
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.

No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...

Read the small print, the extension is for phone support. The warranty is included.
#16
fitaap05
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.

No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...

Are you sure about no more 3 year warranty on Higher Education purchases?
#17
The EU directive, 1999/44/EC, does state that a product should be fit for purpose and that, if a fault occurs within two years, a claim can be made by the consumer provided it is done within two months of discovering the fault. In the UK, however, the SOGA is the ultimate guideline and a shop/retailer can simply use this instead (due to our slightly different membership to the EU and that SOGA is law of the land).

Under this, if a problem occurs after six months, the consumer has up to six years (five in Scotland) to make a claim that the product was sold with an inherent fault, as in "faulty from purchase". This does NOT mean you're entitled to a six year warranty, or if your laptop fails after 18 months.

This article clears up any confusion about the EU directive, SOGA and warranties in general. Anyone believing they're entitled to something they're not should read up on this: http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/bills/article-1677034/Two-year-warranty-EU-law.html

As for the John Lewis warranty, double check what it covers. It's been a while since I've heard people dealing with it and, time was, the warranty would only cover repairs up to the cost of the computer. Should you spend £1,000 and the display fails, costing £500, then the logic board, let's assume another £500, any subsequent repairs would be chargeable.

This may have changed but make sure you're fully covered, I've dealt with people over the years who have been stung by this, assuming that the Macs they sold came with free AppleCare (which has no limit to repair costs).


Edited By: jads on Nov 07, 2013 10:39
#18
fitaap05
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.

No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...

No, actually you do. You get 3 years hardware repair when purchasing through the Educational Store, the additional £48 simply upgrades you to proper AppleCare, providing telephone support. To be honest, it's a waste of money unless you live nowhere near an Apple Store or authorised repair centre.

Source: I've just bought a new Mac through HE.

Edited By: jads on Nov 07, 2013 10:42
#19
jads
fitaap05
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.

No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...

Isn't the 3 year warranty only available through the Higher Education Online Store?
No, actually you do. You get 3 years hardware repair when purchasing through the Educational Store, the additional £48 simply upgrades you to proper AppleCare, providing telephone support. To be honest, it's a waste of money unless you live nowhere near an Apple Store or authorised repair centre.

Source: I've just bought a new Mac through HE.
#20
jads
fitaap05
kneale81
nate49LS
Will JL price match the education discount?

I doubt it. Plus, when you buy through the Apple higher education site (university), not only do you get discount of between 10%-15%, you also get a three year guarantee as standard anyway.

No you don't, it costs £48 to extend warranty to 3 years... One year is the standard...

Did you buy through your university or did you use a web link? If the latter could you PM me the link. Thanks
No, actually you do. You get 3 years hardware repair when purchasing through the Educational Store, the additional £48 simply upgrades you to proper AppleCare, providing telephone support. To be honest, it's a waste of money unless you live nowhere near an Apple Store or authorised repair centre.

Source: I've just bought a new Mac through HE.
#21
Cold, its not a Chromebook! Long live Google!
#22
The 13" Air can be purchased for less through Amazon with the normal Apple guarantee

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