30 mins to Fully Charge Your Batteries £11.29 delivered(includes car charger too!) @ 7dayshop.com with 30 day money back guarantee - HotUKDeals
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30 mins to Fully Charge Your Batteries £11.29 delivered(includes car charger too!) @ 7dayshop.com with 30 day money back guarantee

£11.29 @ 7dayShop
THE V8000 IS AN AMAZING PIECE OF EQUIPMENT AND IS OUR BEST AND FASTEST NI-MH BATTERY CHARGER EVER - You will not find better value anywhere in the UK today for a product with such advanced specificati…
ianshona Avatar
7y, 1m agoFound 7 years, 1 month ago
THE V8000 IS AN AMAZING PIECE OF EQUIPMENT AND IS OUR BEST AND FASTEST NI-MH BATTERY CHARGER EVER - You will not find better value anywhere in the UK today for a product with such advanced specifications !

The BRAND NEW 7dayshop V8000 World-wide travel charger is a top quality microprocessor controlled Ultra-Fast charger, capable of charging either AA and AAA size Ni-Mh (Nickel Metal Hydride) rechargeable batteries. Box includes full operating instructions a Universal Voltage Mains Adapter which has the added benefit of being supplied with 3 detachable plug types suitable for many World-wide power supply sockets. These very handy plugs simply click into the adapter body and you can choose from a UK (3 pin), Euro (round 2 pin) or USA (flat 2 pin) plug types. Also supplied is a FREE 12V car lead (this uses the cars cigar lighter or 12V power socket) for the ultimate in charging convenience.
This brand new V8000 battery charger is especially suitable for the extra demanding user as it offers the very fastest charging times and has the added benefit of being able to be taken abroad as not only will it work with all voltages (from 100~240 volts), but it also comes supplied complete with the 3 detachable mains plugs (as mentioned above and see extra product images).

Recharges from 1 to 4 x AA or AAA batteries at a time
Super safe microprocessor control, fitted with Delta-V overload detection, thermal and timer protection and also reverse polarity protection too
Smart design also incorporates a built in cooling fan for extra battery protection
Automatically switches charging between AA and AAA size batteries
Green and Red LED lights indicates rapid/trickle/full charge and also bad cell detection
Compact and smart design. Measures just H13 x W8 x D3.5cm
Charging times will vary from 20 minutes to 45 minutes according to the type and the specification of batteries used.
May be used with all suitable and good quality Ni-Mh rechargeable batteries.
Buy this superb product with complete confidence. Try this product for 30 days and if you are not 101% delighted with your purchase then please return to us for a full refund of the purchase price paid. All we ask is that you return to us in the good condition and within the original packaging please.
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ianshona Avatar
7y, 1m agoFound 7 years, 1 month ago
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#1
Won't this mess up your batteries charging them so fast all the time?
#2
i've one of this charger and iI can confirm that it's really amazin (but mine came with a lot of 4 special 2.500mA batteries and charging time is only 15-20min).
I use them since several months and the batteries work like the first day :)
#3
Heat Add,1 Bought
#4
I would agree, your batteries will not last as long. A slow charger is best. But if you need it fast, why not, just spend a bit more on new batteries. (there is bigger chance of explosions too)

I would spend my money on these batteries, combined with a slow charger.
http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=107341

These will keep their charge for very long (no auto-discharge like with Ni-Mh). I bought these about 6 months ago from 7-day shop and have used in my camera. Only had to charge once and my camera still works. I've taken over 1000 pictures since.
#5
I've had one for these for a while now and its good when you need your batteries charging fast. As already mentioned I wouldn't like to use it as a main charger as the batteries get HOT.
#6
pet2000;7840212
I would agree, your batteries will not last as long. A slow charger is best. But if you need it fast, why not, just spend a bit more on new batteries. (there is bigger chance of explosions too)

I would spend my money on these batteries, combined with a slow charger.
http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=107341

These will keep their charge for very long (no auto-discharge like with Ni-Mh). I bought these about 6 months ago from 7-day shop and have used in my camera. Only had to charge once and my camera still works. I've taken over 1000 pictures since.


100% in agreement... and that's not often! :whistling:
#7
Voted hot & ordered.
#8
at least there's thermal protection , batteries are going to get red hot in this.
#9
Can this handle hybrid batteries or just Ni-Mh?
Edit - Hmm... I've just downloaded the instructions and it looks like it only works with Ni-Mh. Pity as I mainly use hybrids now.
#10
JunkMail
Can this handle hybrid batteries or just Ni-Mh?
Edit - Hmm... I've just downloaded the instructions and it looks like it only works with Ni-Mh. Pity as I mainly use hybrids now.


If you can believe Maplin its ok for hybrids ,

http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=45798
#11
Ozzie
If you can believe Maplin its ok for hybrids ,

http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=45798


Hmmmmm the manufacturer says no to hybrids, man at Maplins says yes.

Who knows best?.
#12
JunkMail
Can this handle hybrid batteries or just Ni-Mh?


[SIZE="2"]Hope your Hybrid's not made by Toyota? :whistling:[/SIZE]
#13
Anyone any comments if this is a better charger:

http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=100598

More expensive by a few quid and longer charge times, but offers a discharge capability and ability to charge different sizes of battery.
#14
All these 'fast' chargers do is report the battery as charged as soon as you reach the trickle charge point. The battery is NOT 100% charged and it's not physically possible for it to be either. Just buy a normal charger and take tha batteries out after 45 mins for the same effect.
#15
JunkMail
Can this handle hybrid batteries or just Ni-Mh?
Edit - Hmm... I've just downloaded the instructions and it looks like it only works with Ni-Mh. Pity as I mainly use hybrids now.


There are a (very) few batteries around that can take a super fast (1 hour or less) charge without damage, but no hybrids.

Sanyo (eneloop) says quite clearly on their site that you shouldn't use a charger that takes less than 2 hours to fully charge.

From my experience personally, and it seems others on HUKD, all batteries last much longer if charged slowly. Doesn't have to be a 24 hour charge like those cheap bundled chargers often are, in fact apparently those can cause the chemicals inside the battery to crystallise which is bad. Just one that takes a few hours or so.

BillyHey
All these 'fast' chargers do is report the battery as charged as soon as you reach the trickle charge point. The battery is NOT 100% charged and it's not physically possible for it to be either. Just buy a normal charger and take tha batteries out after 45 mins for the same effect.

That would be true I think for car batteries and Lithium, but not necessarily Ni-mh.
With Ni-mh, you can charge at a fixed current, and eventually the battery is full. You can charge a Ni-mh battery at a constant 600mA and after ~6 hours, it will be fully charged (assuming it's around 2500mAh). There's no need for trickle charging.

That said, some of these super fast chargers do themselves use a very high charge rate to start with (e.g. for the first 75%), then slow down, but that's only to protect against overcharging and overheating.
#16
I'd be careful about turbo chargers. They might do 0-60 in nowt but you're risking what you use them with.
#17
It looks like this charger .Says it's for special high current mignon batteries.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hama-Delta-Quad-Charger-high-current-batteries/dp/B000CEB242
#18
I've had several of these chargers from a different retailer, if it wasn't the charger going wrong, it was the PSU. Gave up in the end and bought a decent charger.
Good when it works, and cheap at £11 but don't expect reliability, batteries get fairly hot but the little fan in the centre helps a lot.
#19
I've had this charger since early 2007 and use it with decent capability batteries, 2700mAh & 2800mAh 7dayshop.com's own brand.

It's a superb device which comes with many attachments for the power supply which means you can use it abroad if you wish. It charges AA & AAA and charges all cells individually, so you could put 4 in there & the charging will stop at separate times according to each individual cell requirement. I think you can also mix & match types. The unit has a built in fan for cooling the battery cells as they charge and it runs on after the charging has ended to cool the cells even more. When I first used it I found that it is a bit picky over cell quality & would flash an error for some older rechargeable batteries I tried. I've used batteries in various applications from mice to high drain digital cameras with great battery life.

I definitely recommend this, it has been very useful for me.
#20
pet2000
I would agree, your batteries will not last as long. A slow charger is best. But if you need it fast, why not, just spend a bit more on new batteries. (there is bigger chance of explosions too)

I would spend my money on these batteries, combined with a slow charger.
http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=107341

These will keep their charge for very long (no auto-discharge like with Ni-Mh). I bought these about 6 months ago from 7-day shop and have used in my camera. Only had to charge once and my camera still works. I've taken over 1000 pictures since.


guys, just buy more batteries like the aforementioned and you wouldn't need to charge your batteries so quick (since you will have stock of batteries that don't loose their charge in a matter of weeks). If you still want a relatively fast charge then buy this and select the highest current setting
#21
the technoline has come down in price, cost me £40 3 years ago.. if it's still as good for £28 it's worth it although you need to be a geek to really use it.
#22
Seeing as we are posting alternatives. This one only costs a tenner:

http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=101271

Takes 8 batteries, charges each cell individually and takes around 3-4 hours to charge a fully drained cell (how often do you really need a 30 min charge unless you are really badly organised.
#23
With correct protection of overcharging and heat why is it bad to fast charging.. there are SO many apps which uses fast charge and delta switching no idea where these myths come from.. please back up ur theories that it will fail quicker significantly over time.
#24
Inquisitor
With correct protection of overcharging and heat why is it bad to fast charging.. there are SO many apps which uses fast charge and delta switching no idea where these myths come from.. please back up ur theories that it will fail quicker significantly over time.


because the battery makers and some recharger makers recommend at least 2 hour charge times. I think it is a moot point anyway, just buy yourself some spares if you find yourself in situations that you desperately need a battery often. Eneloop type hybrid batteries can be charged and used as backups since they retain their charge for a long period
#25
Nice find! 7Dayshop are pretty slow at delivering, but have a good range at cheapo prices. I'll be getting one of these chargers for my xbox batteries.
#26
I have been using a 15 minute fast charger for over a year now. My batteries are the cheap 2500mah ones from lidls, they are over two years old now. I have never had a battery fail yet and they are lasting just as long as they did when I charged them on my old 3hr charger.
#27
Off topic a bit,but was wondering if anyone could answer this question?
I have quite a few Re-chargable batteries but the don`t work in everything,remotes and camera work fine but some other things they don`t...any reason why?
#28
1616french
Off topic a bit,but was wondering if anyone could answer this question?
I have quite a few Re-chargable batteries but the don`t work in everything,remotes and camera work fine but some other things they don`t...any reason why?


I've had this before for the following reasons -

1, The + contact was not as prominent when put side by side with other batteries.

2, From what I have read rechargeable batteries are not always exactly the same size as non rechargeable batteries.


Sure someone will give you better advice than I can but hope it helps.
#29
1616french
Off topic a bit,but was wondering if anyone could answer this question?
I have quite a few Re-chargable batteries but the don`t work in everything,remotes and camera work fine but some other things they don`t...any reason why?


Could be because high power appliances need the full amount of voltage (re-chargeable batteries have 1.2v whereas disposable ones are 1.5v generally)




but on the reply to post before...

I've NEVER seen any rechargeable battery packs which say "these batteries recommended charge is for at least 2 hours" or whatever.

From what I know, trickle charging batteries actually 'do more damage' to batteries as it has a higher chance that it will crystallise etc., compared to charging with microprocessors in them (to give safe maximum charge in the shortest time).

Source link: http://www.mpoweruk.com/chargers.htm
(simply first link in google).

P.S. not to have a stab at particulars on ranting what they think they know, but its nice to give true informed information to the people that doesn't know.
#30
Inquisitor;7850204
I've NEVER seen any rechargeable battery packs which say "these batteries recommended charge is for at least 2 hours" or whatever.


Sanyo stress this for their Eneloop batteries (as someone else mentioned I am sure!)

http://www.eneloop.info/home/faq.html (see item 12)

INcidentally, this type (Low Self Discharge) also generally seem to work in gear that standard NiMH batteries don't!
#31
HertzVanRental
Anyone any comments if this is a better charger:

http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=100598

More expensive by a few quid and longer charge times, but offers a discharge capability and ability to charge different sizes of battery.


I think I remember reading somewhere that the discharge capability is for Ni-Cad batteries, which are very old, as most batteries are NiMh nowadays, so you probably wouldn't benefit from that feature.
#32
HertzVanRental
Anyone any comments if this is a better charger:

http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=777_3&products_id=100598

More expensive by a few quid and longer charge times, but offers a discharge capability and ability to charge different sizes of battery.


I have had both chargers - and the more expensive one is better and can restore some dead batteries, the cheaper one can tend to kill some cells..... m aybe because of the quick charge times...
#33
nihcaj
Sanyo stress this for their Eneloop batteries (as someone else mentioned I am sure!)

http://www.eneloop.info/home/faq.html (see item 12)

INcidentally, this type (Low Self Discharge) also generally seem to work in gear that standard NiMH batteries don't!


interesting, im guessing they're covering themselves in which "quick chargers" to the majority of people means a charger which simply sticks alot of amps into the batt.

This charger on the OP is more complex (i assume since it has microprocessors etc) version of a "Basic" fast charger. quotes from link i posted above:

"There is thus a limit to the charge acceptance rate of the cell. Continuing to pump energy into the cell faster than the chemicals can react to the charge can cause local overcharge conditions including polarisation, overheating as well as unwanted chemical reactions, near to the electrodes thus damaging the cell. Fast charging forces up the rate of chemical reaction in the cell (as does fast discharging) and it may be necessary to allow "rest periods" during the charging process for the chemical actions to propagate throughout the bulk of the chemical mass in the cell and to stabilise at progressive levels of charge."

However if use intelligent charger (i.e. OP I assume) "Pulsed Charger. Uses a series transistor which can also be switched. With low battery voltages the transistor remains on and conducts the source current directly to the battery. As the battery voltage approaches the desired regulation voltage the series transistor pulses the input current to maintain the desired voltage. Because it acts as a switch mode supply for part of the cycle it dissipates less heat and because it acts as a linear supply part of the time the output filters can be smaller. Pulsing allows the battery time to stabilise (recover) with low increments of charge at progressively high charge levels during charging. During rest periods the polarisation of the cell is lowered. This process permits faster charging than possible with one prolonged high level charge which could damage the battery since it does not permit gradual stabilisation of the active chemicals during charging. Pulse chargers usually need current limiting on the input source for safety reasons, adding to the cost."

& (the delta [by time] charge I was saying earlier) "dT/dt Charge system NiMH batteries do not demonstrate such a pronounced NDV voltage drop when they reach the end of the charging cycle as can be seen in the graph above and so the NDV cut off method is not reliable for ending the NiMH charge. Instead the charger senses the rate of increase of the cell temperature per unit time. When a predetermined rate is reached the rapid charge is stopped and the charge method is switched to trickle charge. This method is more expensive but avoids overcharge and gives longer life. Because extended trickle charging can damage a NiMH battery, the use of a timer to regulate the total charging time is recommended."

Thus all is well :roll: :-D if you realllyy want more details on it, you can read that link. its quite informative.. tho missing some equations and proofs to back up descriptions..
#34
All of this is a bit academic anyway.

If I was a business, with 25,000 cells charging away daily, in various premises scattered all over the country, then it might be an issue one way or the other, but even if (and I am not convinced I do!) if I get 3 minutes less use from a cell costing only about 50% as much as the top brand, or if I get just 900 charges instead of 1000 (and I am not convinced I get any less) I am still quids-in compared to the astronomical cost of disposables; therefore I look on this pragmatically:

I buy what I perceive as the best value cells I can find (now always Low Self Discharge as they are simply so much less bother); and I charge them with a unit that takes a couple of hours, but; as the other cells I have hold their charge, I have enough ready charged at hand so I am never in a hurry to get them charged in a few minutes!

Net effect, no hassles or bother; I always have charged cells handy, I am never in a rush to get them charged, I don't ever need to buy disposables, I spend precious little money on it overall.

Simple, saves a small fortune.
#35
Yaaaaawn, uh - sorry about that.

This is a good deal for what's on offer, not that it hasn't been sold at this price before though.
#36
I use a Uniross 15 minute charger which I have had for over 3 years, never had a problem with the batteries, has a built in fan to cool the batteries down whilst charging :)
#37
Inquisitor
interesting, im guessing they're covering themselves in which "quick chargers" to the majority of people means a charger which simply sticks alot of amps into the batt.

That is actually exactly what this charger is doing.

Inquisitor
"There is thus a limit to the charge acceptance rate of the cell. Continuing to pump energy into the cell faster than the chemicals can react to the charge can cause local overcharge conditions including polarisation, overheating as well as unwanted chemical reactions, near to the electrodes thus damaging the cell. Fast charging forces up the rate of chemical reaction in the cell (as does fast discharging) and it may be necessary to allow "rest periods" during the charging process for the chemical actions to propagate throughout the bulk of the chemical mass in the cell and to stabilise at progressive levels of charge."

This fast charger has no rest periods. The only device I've encountered that do are industrial battery analysers, several hundreds of pounds new. Hence why Sanyo recommends a 2 hour+ charge.

Inquisitor
However if use intelligent charger (i.e. OP I assume) "[I]Pulsed Charger. Uses a series transistor which can also be switched.

This doesn't use pulse charging, as above.

Inquisitor
& (the delta [by time] charge I was saying earlier) "[I]dT/dt Charge system NiMH batteries do not demonstrate such a pronounced NDV voltage drop when they reach the end of the charging cycle as can be seen in the graph above and so the NDV cut off method is not reliable for ending the NiMH charge.

This charger is using NDV cut off (aka "Delta V" or "dV/dt"). To get the more reliable dT/dt cut off you need a £50+ Ansmann charger. And even those chargers still take a couple of hours to fully charge as recommended by the battery companies.

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