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30GB Kingston SSD - 200MB/sec - £59.99 @ ccl

£59.99 @ CCLOnline
30GB Kingston SSDNow V-Series SATA - £59.99 @ ccl SATA II Read: up to 200 MB/sec Write: up to 160 MB/sec with Bundled Desktop Upgrade Kit Read More
mikerr Avatar
6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
30GB Kingston SSDNow V-Series SATA - £59.99 @ ccl

SATA II
Read: up to 200 MB/sec
Write: up to 160 MB/sec
with Bundled Desktop Upgrade Kit
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mikerr Avatar
6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
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#2
30GB is too small really, you'll have barely anything left after os.
#3
Weenie Beenie
30GB is too small really, you'll have barely anything left after os.


Indeed, my Windows folder on my Win7 install is 16GB. That is over half this disk full before actually installing anything else other than your OS!

IMHO you shouldn't really get anything less than 60GB. Good price nonetheless, and the speeds seem impressive.
#4
But u can get 64gb ssd with or without kit for lessthan 2x32gb of these kits .

Edited By: Jellybeans on Aug 08, 2010 15:01: clarification
#5
well don't use win7 with it then. 32gb is enough for XP and Linux, or Macos and linux, dual boot.
or realise that probably the remaining 14gb is plenty for all your apps, even with win7.
#6
Depends what your budget is. You mightn't have enough cash for 64GB straight away.

This is a good price for an entry-level 30GB SSD, especially if the kit includes Acronis backup software, which the Kingston website seems to indicate it does (EDIT: the Kingston installation videos explicitly state that Acronis is included). The software costs about £18 on Amazon and the cables/adapters are probably worth another £5 or £10 on top of that.

As long as you don't need a lot of storage over and above what your OS needs (and cheap external non-SSDs are best for storing large files without spending too much anyway), then this is a reasonably fast drive with which to upgrade your computer's performance substantially.

Edited By: Espresso on Aug 08, 2010 15:20: new information about inclusion of Acronis
#7
Says they are just launched so should be using up to date electronics

Review here
http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1242/1/

Wonder how 4 of these in RAID 0 would perform
#8
"The unfortunate part of that is the write speed, which at 50MB/s, falls below hard drive speed and frankly, is disappointing."

hmm.
I wouldn't use RAID0 personally because of the risk of errors and added complexity.
#10
Main thread needs updating with correct specs :
Sequential Speed*:
* Up to 180MB/sec. read
* 50MB/sec. write
#11
Too slow.
#12
Can't quite see the point in this, unless silence is your thing.
#13
londislagerhound
Can't quite see the point in this, unless silence is your thing.


Good for a laptop.
#14
It's a great boot drive. I keep windows, and core apps on the drive. Although, with the 64gb kingston knocking around for only £20 more, this doesn't represent value for money anymore. And yes, silence and speed is my thing.
#15
Smiff
"The unfortunate part of that is the write speed, which at 50MB/s, falls below hard drive speed and frankly, is disappointing."hmm.I wouldn't use RAID0 personally because of the risk of errors and added complexity.

Its not rocket science there's hardware raid which most decent spec boards have and there's software based raid with windows disc management console but no one in there right mind would strip 2x30gb ssd you would be better with a 6*gb version and if it where me i would buy this one its made by crucial and is 64gb at £119 from novatech or £112 from scan the 128gb and up are some of the best drives there is and this is there entry level size but with the added benefit of being sata3 so it will be quicker than standard and this drive has good reviews with good speeds and from one of the best memory maufacturers there is so with excellent warranty. If you want the best you want a ssd with the new sandforce chips i dont know if this has them but would imagine it does.

Average Access Time < .1 ms
Sequential Read (up to) 355MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/s)
265MB/sec (SATA 3Gb/s)
Sequential Write (up to) 140MB/sec (SATA 6Gb/s)
140MB/sec (SATA 3Gb/s)
Random 4k READ 50,000 IOPS
Random 4k WRITE 30,000 IOPS


http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/prods/Components/HardDrives-Internal/SolidState/CTFDDAC064MAG-1G1.html
http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductId=1259836&source=hx1

Edited By: polly69 on Aug 08, 2010 22:46: adding data
#16
If you are after a single SSD, I definately recommend spending the extra £20 for the 64GB drive @ eBuyer. Even if you are wanting RAID, £120 for 2x30GB compared to £160 for 2x64GB - IMO the extra £40 for RAID is worth it.

In terms of an SSD drive, £60 is a decent price. But when you compare that miniscule 30GB to an SSD with double the storage for just £20 more (and faster, btw!)... it's pretty cold imo.

30GB @ £60 = £2/GB
64GB @ £83 (ebuyer went up £3) = £1.30/GB
#18
could someone please explain the advantages of these, and why so expensive?
#19
gordon999
could someone please explain the advantages of these, and why so expensive?


SSD's are smaller, generate far less heat, and consume much less power. For this reason they are ideal for laptops and netbooks as it extends battery life and also performance. That's really the main reason for SSD's - performance! They have no seek times (8.9ms for most HDD's due to mechanical heads having to seek) and transfer rates are usually superior too.

Many report that by installing your OS and most used applications to an SSD, boot times are dramatically shortened, as is the time it takes to open programs (Photoshop, for instance). Basically all-round system performance increase.

It's still a fairly new technology with a rather slow 'mainstream' adoption. As time goes on and more folk buy, the quicker they will drop in price. I would like to imagine we'll see 1TB SSD's for

edit: Plus, SSD's do not suffer from fragmentation like HDD's too, but performance can degrade a bit over time. Some SSD's have something called a 'TRIM' feature that basically restores performance back to it's factory state

Edited By: woohoomoo on Aug 09, 2010 00:18: more info
1 Like #20
30GB is enough - if you can be efficient. One thing to remember is Windows 7 sets the page file and hibernation file to be the same size as your total RAM. So if you have 6GB, you're going to have 12GB taken up on the SSD already, unless you shorten the size of your page file and disable Hibernation.

I've got Windows 7 with quite a handful of apps (40+ or so) with a 2gb page file, and with hiberfil.sys disabled.and this has used up 28GB out of my 74GB Intel SSD.

Space does seem small on 30GB but SSDs are always better accompanied with a large mechanical hard drive for you to store videos/music/app installs files etc. I'm also a gamer and run them off the mechanical as well.

I can recommend an SSD, it's the best thing you can do for your PC. Fast boot time, and fast app launching. everything in general feels snappy with the OS on the SSD.


Edited By: aarste on Aug 09, 2010 01:13: grammar
#21
woohoomoo

edit: Plus, SSD's do not suffer from fragmentation like HDD's too, but performance can degrade a bit over time. Some SSD's have something called a 'TRIM' feature that basically restores performance back to it's factory state


1) technically ssd's do suffer from fragmentation (the file being split in different parts of the ssd), but the problem of fragmentation is doesnt exist in ssd's because unlike hard disks, the heads do not have to seek (physically move) to different parts of the ssd.

2) fragmentation is actually technically better (to a degree) since the ssd can read from many parts of the storage at any moment and thus increase performance.

interestingly point 2 is where a lot of performance increase in being made, generally, the more chips within the ssd allow more simultaneous reads, thus increasing read and possible write speeds. there are of course other ways to increase performance, namely optimisations in the algorithm to distribute data across each "read area"; and increasing the number of read areas within a single chip thus reducing the number of chips needed to provide the same number of read areas. kind of confusing, but hope that makes sense.


woohoomoo: i knew what you really meant by ".. ssds to not suffer from fragmentation" to actually mean "ssds do not suffer any degradation in performance because of fragmentation, unlike hds". i just trying to explain it more for anyone interested.
#22
ascen

woohoomoo: i knew what you really meant by ".. ssds to not suffer from fragmentation" to actually mean "ssds do not suffer any degradation in performance because of fragmentation, unlike hds". i just trying to explain it more for anyone interested.


The way I read it , you have actually made things worse. Newbie should skip your post
You have obscured the issue by not actually explaining the impact of fragmentation on SSDs.

COCO
banned#23
Perfect for a HTPC when you need an OS and not much more.
#24
Are SSDs a lot more reliable than normal mechanical hard drives then?
#25
I_SHOULD_COCO
ascen

woohoomoo: i knew what you really meant by ".. ssds to not suffer from fragmentation" to actually mean "ssds do not suffer any degradation in performance because of fragmentation, unlike hds". i just trying to explain it more for anyone interested.


The way I read it , you have actually made things worse. Newbie should skip your post
You have obscured the issue by not actually explaining the impact of fragmentation on SSDs.

COCO


yes you are correct, a newbies should simply ignore the post as it will simply confuse people. the intent was just to explain an interesting aspect of ssds to interested people (not many :) ).
#26
Searcher2
Are SSDs a lot more reliable than normal mechanical hard drives then?


Yes. HDD's have moving parts whereas SSD's are, well... solid state drives - no moving parts, so less to go wrong. The MTBF (average time between a failure of one drive to another) of SSD's will be much higher than that of HDD's too. Plus SSD's will withstand a much higher shock - both operational and when idle - again making it ideal for laptops/netbooks, especially if you carry very sensitive and critical data.
#27
It is six months since I built my PC with the Intel X25 M. I cannot remember the technical reasons, but essentially the old Kingston V series are rubbish. I am surprised they are still for sale. The Kingston M series (based on my Intel drive) are much much better.

I think it has something to do with TRIM not working. The disk will fill up it will slow to a crawl.
#28
woohoomoo
Searcher2
Are SSDs a lot more reliable than normal mechanical hard drives then?
Yes. HDD's have moving parts whereas SSD's are, well... solid state drives - no moving parts, so less to go wrong. The MTBF (average time between a failure of one drive to another) of SSD's will be much higher than that of HDD's too. Plus SSD's will withstand a much higher shock - both operational and when idle - again making it ideal for laptops/netbooks, especially if you carry very sensitive and critical data.


Don't forget to add that SSD's have a limited number of writes in its' lifetime.. alot less than a HDD
#29
woohoomoo
gordon999
could someone please explain the advantages of these, and why so expensive?


SSD's are smaller, generate far less heat, and consume much less power. For this reason they are ideal for laptops and netbooks as it extends battery life and also performance. That's really the main reason for SSD's - performance! They have no seek times (8.9ms for most HDD's due to mechanical heads having to seek) and transfer rates are usually superior too.

Many report that by installing your OS and most used applications to an SSD, boot times are dramatically shortened, as is the time it takes to open programs (Photoshop, for instance). Basically all-round system performance increase.

It's still a fairly new technology with a rather slow 'mainstream' adoption. As time goes on and more folk buy, the quicker they will drop in price. I would like to imagine we'll see 1TB SSD's for

edit: Plus, SSD's do not suffer from fragmentation like HDD's too, but performance can degrade a bit over time. Some SSD's have something called a 'TRIM' feature that basically restores performance back to it's factory state

ok
is there any desktops/laptops on the market currently that have ssds already installed.
i remember reading about these a while ago now, less failure due to no moving parts or something along them lines.. they're looking very expensive atm
#30
woohoomoo
Don't forget to add that SSD's have a limited number of writes in its' lifetime.. alot less than a HDD


They should last long enough, one example I saw is an Intel SSD can withstand around 100GB of writes per day and last for 5 years. Now, the average user who could be browsing all day and playing a game now and then would be using 2-3GB of writes per day. I'll leave the rest for you to figure out :) I've still yet to see my SSD hit 2% of wear, it's on 1% and 6 months old.

Edited By: aarste on Aug 09, 2010 20:47: extra info
#31
ascen
I_SHOULD_COCO
ascen

woohoomoo: i knew what you really meant by ".. ssds to not suffer from fragmentation" to actually mean "ssds do not suffer any degradation in performance because of fragmentation, unlike hds". i just trying to explain it more for anyone interested.


The way I read it , you have actually made things worse. Newbie should skip your post
You have obscured the issue by not actually explaining the impact of fragmentation on SSDs.

COCO


yes you are correct, a newbies should simply ignore the post as it will simply confuse people. the intent was just to explain an interesting aspect of ssds to interested people (not many :) ).


What he means is that you will confuse readers, by spouting ill-informed, unreliable information about SSD drives.

Here is a well written article about SSD for n00bs :

http://www.anandtech.com/show/2829

Edited By: JamesSmith on Aug 09, 2010 21:49: Correction
#32
no hdmi? wtf! voted cold
#33
HDMI? On a hard drive? Either you suck at trolling or you posted on the wrong deal! :-D
#34
MIDURIX
no hdmi? wtf! voted cold

Just buy it. You can drill through the middle and push an hdmi cable through it. The special plastic coating on the hdmi will pick up the gamma rays from inside the ssd and will work as normal.
1 Like #35
piginabox
MIDURIX
no hdmi? wtf! voted cold

Just buy it. You can drill through the middle and push an hdmi cable through it. The special plastic coating on the hdmi will pick up the gamma rays from inside the ssd and will work as normal.

ahhh, thankyou! bought 3

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