32 AA or AAA Panasonic Batteries Pack £3.98 @ Morrisons - HotUKDeals
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Grab a pack of 32 AA or AAA batteries at £3.98 at Morrisons!

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Rhys135 Avatar
8y, 2m agoFound 8 years, 2 months ago
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#1
Thanks OP :)

Plus with staff discount that makes it...£3.58 :-D
#2
HOT from me btw.
#3
are these alkaline? if they're not, then it's not that good of deal
#4
They are pretty poor. At that price they are useful in emergencies or low power devices like LEDs, clocks, remote controls, etc.
#5
Boooooo. Rechargeable or nothing...
#6
Don't want to moan or lecture...
But please remember your local DIY store or recycling centre will recycle these for you once you have used them up.
I use rechargebles and after a while of reusing they do make disposables seem very expensive, I've been reusing the same set of hi-capacity ones for years and the performance is excellent and the savings make it worth it... as well of course as the environmental benefit.
Keep your eye open and if you see a good offer for a recharger and batteries give it a go and I'm sure you won't look back!
#7
Curry's Digital also recycle batteries brah
#8
[SIZE="2"]They certainly had these batteries in at M's but they were special flashed at £5 not £3.98 :-(

As to the rechargeable against disposable argument, I agree totally that rechargeables should be the way to go BUT not all products will run properly on rechargeables as they are designed to run at 1.5volts per cell and the rechargeables produce 1.2volts. This tends to mean that the kit expecting 1.5volts per cell will flatten the 1.2volts per cell batteries or won't work at all.

It's totally regrettable that this is the case but it is.[/SIZE]
#9
Plus, don't forget, if you are using rechargeables to be green, that you are still using electric to charge them up, and the manufacturing process. If you're using them for cost, again, you have to pay for electric :)
#10
@cibarious

Not quite right.

Consider the following from batterylogic.co.uk:

Q : Can I use 1.2 V rechargeable batteries in devices that usually take 1.5 V throw away batteries?

A: Yes, most definitely. Using 1.2 V rechargeable batteries will have no effect on the use of the equipment. In fact an alkaline battery only benefits from 1.5 V voltage at the beginning of its discharge. Then, it drops constantly to well below 1.2 V. Finally, it drops to around 0.6 V. Most equipment will work happily on anything between 0.9 V and 1.5 V. Unlike alkaline batteries where the voltage drops quickly, rechargeable batteries offer a more constant voltage around 1.25 V throughout the entire period of use.

That is why the latest rechargeable batteries will actually outperform alkaline batteries in equipment calling for a constant and high level of energy input, such as digital cameras, flashes, camcorders, computers, portable phones, CD players, toys, gadgets - well just about anything.


It doesn't matter whether the product usually takes 1.5 V batteries, as the standard AA batteries don't stay at 1.5 V themselves! I've yet to find something that doesn't take rechargeables and I've got a lot of older electronics that work fine.

And peodude... true, but the cost of the electricity used to charge them up again is still far less than the price of a new set of AA batteries. My 90 minute charger charges 4 rechargable AA's using 0.216 kWh and costs 0.929p...
#11
I use rechargabled but not for everything. E.g. a 5 LED headlands will run 100 hours on a single charge/disposable.
#12
LadyA
@cibarious

Not quite right.

Consider the following from batterylogic.co.uk:

Q : Can I use 1.2 V rechargeable batteries in devices that usually take 1.5 V throw away batteries?

A: Yes, most definitely. Using 1.2 V rechargeable batteries will have no effect on the use of the equipment. In fact an alkaline battery only benefits from 1.5 V voltage at the beginning of its discharge. Then, it drops constantly to well below 1.2 V. Finally, it drops to around 0.6 V. Most equipment will work happily on anything between 0.9 V and 1.5 V. Unlike alkaline batteries where the voltage drops quickly, rechargeable batteries offer a more constant voltage around 1.25 V throughout the entire period of use.

That is why the latest rechargeable batteries will actually outperform alkaline batteries in equipment calling for a constant and high level of energy input, such as digital cameras, flashes, camcorders, computers, portable phones, CD players, toys, gadgets - well just about anything.


It doesn't matter whether the product usually takes 1.5 V batteries, as the standard AA batteries don't stay at 1.5 V themselves! I've yet to find something that doesn't take rechargeables and I've got a lot of older electronics that work fine.

And peodude... true, but the cost of the electricity used to charge them up again is still far less than the price of a new set of AA batteries. My 90 minute charger charges 4 rechargable AA's using 0.216 kWh and costs 0.929p...

[SIZE="2"]
Like most general statements, this is also true in part and that's why I only suggested that rechargeables are not always suitable.

For example, I have a Logitech mouse that takes AA batteries and the time that a rechargeable lasts in there is less than half of a "normal" AA battery. I also have some old stuff that will not run on rechargeable batteries, even fresh out of the charger.[/SIZE]

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