3TB Hitachi XL3000 USB 2.0 External Hard Drive - £107.98 @ Scan - HotUKDeals
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3TB Hitachi XL3000 USB 2.0 External Hard Drive - £107.98 @ Scan

£107.98 @ Scan
Free delivery for AV Forum members. Otherwise it's £3.99. Cheaper Than The Bare Drive Inside! Solid. Ready whenever you are (That's what she said?). With the dependable speed of USB 2.0. W… Read More
mamboboy Avatar
6y, 1m agoFound 6 years, 1 month ago
Free delivery for AV Forum members. Otherwise it's £3.99.

Cheaper Than The Bare Drive Inside! Solid. Ready whenever you are (That's what she said?). With the dependable speed of USB 2.0.

When you need pure storage muscle, choose a drive that makes backing up your life a little easier. Because nothing should ever get in the way of your memories, movies, music and entertainment. Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives used to store, preserve and manage the world's most valued data.

• Interface: USB 2.0.
• 3.5-inch Form Factor.
• Smooth textured body fits any décor.

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#1
Possibly not a bad price, though it's £110 @ ebuyer so maybe

Remember you can get free delivery if you're a regular user of various Tech forums (e.g. Hexus)

Edited By: aeonf242 on May 06, 2011 08:43
#2
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"

As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM...
#3
Hitachi HD's reliable?
#4
I've got the often posted 1tb Hitachi drive and its been great.
#5
jig
Hitachi HD's reliable?


They used to have a bad reputation, but these days I think they are as reliable as any other drive. I expect someone will disagree! lol
3 Likes #7
BlueDan
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"

As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM...


Sigh. 2001 called, they'd like their comment back.
#8
can i just ask..... that phrase, "THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID" - where the heck did it come from?
1 Like #9
In case anyone is thinking of buying this and using the drive as an internal one, Hitachi confirmed to me that the warranty would be voided if the disk is removed from the caddy.

For use as an external drive, USB2 would make for a very slow process filling this drive. It should come with esata or usb3 IMO.

Otherwise, good price.
#10
Not that I'm one to hold a grudge but I suffered at the hands of the legendary 40GB IBM "Deathstar" harddisks many moons ago.. I don't think I'll *ever* buy a Hitachi drive based on that fiasco!
#11
Wicked Lester
BlueDan
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"

As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM...


Sigh. 2001 called, they'd like their comment back.


Who are you, Hitachi's mum?

Tons of IBM hard disks failed, some within days, some brand new but DOA.

IBM tried to make out some of the ones that lasted a bit longer had failed outside of a permissible number of hours as if they had been used in a server to try and get out of warranty obligations. It turned out the number of hours was pathetically low and normal desktop use would get though them well within the warranty period.

The whole thing was eventually settled by a class action lawsuit.

The glass platters called, they'd like their ferric coating back.
#12
aeonf242
Possibly not a bad price, though it's £110 @ ebuyer so maybe
Hexus)


Not sure why you would want to buy of ebuyer even if it was a few quid cheaper, its very costly and time consuming to return a HDD to them. They have the most ridiculously painful HDD return policy of anyone ive ever experienced.


Edited By: spaceinvader on May 06, 2011 10:07
#13
Eggs in one basket me thinks
#14
Please see my post last time this was a deal on scan


EMM386
mbuckhurst
Just used 2 of these to get at the internal drives for my raid 5 HP microserver, fantastic performance, low power consumption and noise. If you're happy to take the risk of 3GB on a single drive, the power savings would pay for the drive in a couple of years compared to 2 external 1.5TB drives.

I've re-used one of the caddies to hold a smaller disk I had lying around, very easy to do.
mike

mbuckhurst
Pretty sure it's 7200rpm, it's the same drive as the internal 3TB Hitachi, that's more expensive, you might invalidate the warranty if Hitachi keep a record of serials for which drive becomes external or internal, but given the price difference I can take a risk since for 3 drives you've practically covered the cost of a spare.
mike

Hi Mike

Thanks for a very informative post.

I like you, am looking for drives to put in my HP N36L Microserver.

I was gonna use 5 x 2Tb Samsung SpinPoint F4

But I might use 5 of these instead now

A few things concern me though.

1) It look like the external doesn't just contain Hitachi's internal drive, unless numerous websites have the tech specs wrong (whichis entirely possible). The internal is a 4K sector drive and the external is reported to be a 512byte drive. This should increase compatibility with older OS'es (although the larger 2+Tb size may negate this). But reduce performace and perhaps more importantly error correction

2) It also appears to be a 7200rpm drive which would be good for a desktop but bad for a Server/NAS as it should increase power consumption.

3) Kinda related to above it uses 5 disc platters instead of the WD's 4. This again should mean it requires more power to move the 5 platters as compared to the 4.

4) Finally from photo reviews it looks like there is a void warranty sticker that needs to be broken to remove the drive, meaning a failure after even a month may not be honoured. A heat gun/hair dryer however may allow the stick to be removed intact
#15
BlueDan
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"

As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM...
#16
Hey! I used to work for IBM and I would like to defend the good name of IBM.... but I can't.
#17
chicaneuk
Not that I'm one to hold a grudge but I suffered at the hands of the legendary 40GB IBM "Deathstar" harddisks many moons ago.. I don't think I'll *ever* buy a Hitachi drive based on that fiasco!

I too suffered with their glass platters etc, however that was a decade ago and i don't have a problem with them anymore.
#18
MuscleFlex
can i just ask..... that phrase, "THAT'S WHAT SHE SAID" - where the heck did it come from?


The US version of The Office made it famous, but it was originally in Wayne's World, and a similar version was used way way before somewhere, but was in more war time like wording.
1 Like #19
slliw
Eggs in one basket me thinks


haven't you ever heard of the concept of backups?

it's been around for years. it makes your thoughts pointless as the same thought would apply to any hardrive or system regardless of size. you backup everything and you don't have a problem, you don't backup and you might have a problem if your hardware fails etc

only an idiot would stick everything on a single drive regardless of size and not bother backing up. over the last few years i've seen the same stupid comment for hardrives from 100gb upwards. recent advances saw the same comments for 1tb drives, 1.5tb drives, 2tb drives, and now 3tb drives, and with 1tb platters and 4tb drives due out towards the end of the year, the same idiots will be saying the same stupid thing about 4tb drives, but as the years advance maybe a bit of sense will take over instead

as for the drive, it's only certain older versions of windows that have issues with drives over 2.19tb, but there are various solutions such as 3tb+unlock or paragon gpt disc manager that allow users of those systems to use the extra space as a virtual partition, so you get a full 2tb usable space (thats approx 200gb more usable space than a formatted 2tb drive) and another 746gb partition - that is IF you take the drive out the caddy (pretty simple - just flip off the front panel, unscrew 2 screws and push, unscrew the drive and voila) and use it internally. as an external usb2 drive you can use the full 3tb partition, but it would take forever and a day to fill via usb2

as for warranty, depending on what you do with the drive, would you really want to send it back if it developed a fault, to let people you don't know access your data? whether it's legit personal stuff, work or stuff you downloaded, you probably don't want someone else to see it, thus making a warranty a bit pointless for a lot of people

as for brands, i don't think any brand over another is that much better or worse than any other drive in the same price catagory. it doesn't matter if it's hitachi, sumsung, seagate, or western digital, there is little in it these days

as for retailer, i find scans service the best of all, especially if you get free next day delivery, order today, get delivery tomorrow. ebuyer is much slower in that respect. as regards to returns, i did have to return a drive to ebuyer and had no problems at all, they arranged a courier to pick it up, and a few days later i got a brand new replacement delivered, i just RMA'd online, very simple and painless. i've heard nothing but horror stories about ebuyer returns so expected the worst, but i think the whole turnaround was approximately a week from uplift to receiving replacement

one other little thing, the last time this drive was at this price, it was slightly cheaper by a couple of quicd from scan a day or two later
#20
I've just received mine and can confirm that Windows identifies the disk inside as an HDS723030ALA640, which is a 7K3000.

Edited By: thelonious on May 06, 2011 12:37
#21
uni
as for warranty, depending on what you do with the drive, would you really want to send it back if it developed a fault, to let people you don't know access your data? whether it's legit personal stuff, work or stuff you downloaded, you probably don't want someone else to see it, thus making a warranty a bit pointless for a lot of people


I agree that I wouldn't want to send a disk away for RMA due to personal data, however if they offer a 5 year warranty instead of 3, 2 or even just 1 it's only because they expect very few to fail within five years.
banned#22
mr glitter will find this useful
#23
chicaneuk
Not that I'm one to hold a grudge but I suffered at the hands of the legendary 40GB IBM "Deathstar" harddisks many moons ago.. I don't think I'll *ever* buy a Hitachi drive based on that fiasco!
What would you suggest? WD maybe?

How odd that over the last couple of years it's been the Hitachi HDD's that I've installed that have had the lowest failure rate (and I've installed hundreds of HDD's in that time).

I've had 7 x 7K100's myself since 2009, and none of them have had any problems yet (unlike the WD Caviar Green drives I tried a couple of times...).
#24
You could literally post ANY brand of hard drive and people come in with the same comments.

Truth is, hard drives have come on leaps and bounds since the start of the millenium. My PC is more or less on 24/7 with various branded drives and none of them give me problems or make clicking sounds (touch wood!).

It astonishes me that the click of death/deathstar thing still lingers on today. The Sandy Bridge intel saga was far more serious IMO as that was the long term degradation of more than one component - yet i rarely see people leave "cold, intel motherboards kill computers!" in intel related deals for example.

Edited By: mamboboy on May 06, 2011 14:49
#25
BlueDan
uni
as for warranty, depending on what you do with the drive, would you really want to send it back if it developed a fault, to let people you don't know access your data? whether it's legit personal stuff, work or stuff you downloaded, you probably don't want someone else to see it, thus making a warranty a bit pointless for a lot of people


I agree that I wouldn't want to send a disk away for RMA due to personal data, however if they offer a 5 year warranty instead of 3, 2 or even just 1 it's only because they expect very few to fail within five years.


i was referring to the part where you would lose the warranty if you remove the drive from the caddy to use internally. i think the external drive with caddy has a year warranty whilst the drive on it's own has a 3 year warranty, but ironically although it's the exact same drive inside and it incurs extra cost to add the caddy during manufacture, the external drive is cheaper, but they just won't honour the longer warranty. i presume the shorter warranty for the external drive is due to more things potentially going wrong, particularly as the caddy seems to be pretty cheaply made, so if there is a problem it's more than likely going to be the caddy than the drive that breaks first

the caddy doesn't have an on and off switch btw, like a few of the newer external drives, just cheap plastic that's always on. i prefer the older caddies i have with proper switches and metal bodies
#26
Is there a solution yet to using 3TB drives on WHS? Tempted to add to my pool of drives on my HP MediaSmart - but WHS previously would not recognise anything of 2.2TB.
#27
EMM386
Please see my post last time this was a deal on scan


EMM386
mbuckhurst
Just used 2 of these to get at the internal drives for my raid 5 HP microserver, fantastic performance, low power consumption and noise. If you're happy to take the risk of 3GB on a single drive, the power savings would pay for the drive in a couple of years compared to 2 external 1.5TB drives.

I've re-used one of the caddies to hold a smaller disk I had lying around, very easy to do.
mike

mbuckhurst
Pretty sure it's 7200rpm, it's the same drive as the internal 3TB Hitachi, that's more expensive, you might invalidate the warranty if Hitachi keep a record of serials for which drive becomes external or internal, but given the price difference I can take a risk since for 3 drives you've practically covered the cost of a spare.
mike

Hi Mike

Thanks for a very informative post.

I like you, am looking for drives to put in my HP N36L Microserver.

I was gonna use 5 x 2Tb Samsung SpinPoint F4

But I might use 5 of these instead now

A few things concern me though.

1) It look like the external doesn't just contain Hitachi's internal drive, unless numerous websites have the tech specs wrong (whichis entirely possible). The internal is a 4K sector drive and the external is reported to be a 512byte drive. This should increase compatibility with older OS'es (although the larger 2+Tb size may negate this). But reduce performace and perhaps more importantly error correction

2) It also appears to be a 7200rpm drive which would be good for a desktop but bad for a Server/NAS as it should increase power consumption.

3) Kinda related to above it uses 5 disc platters instead of the WD's 4. This again should mean it requires more power to move the 5 platters as compared to the 4.

4) Finally from photo reviews it looks like there is a void warranty sticker that needs to be broken to remove the drive, meaning a failure after even a month may not be honoured. A heat gun/hair dryer however may allow the stick to be removed intact

Ok, having had mine running 24x7 in a raid 5 array, 2 from caddies one bought as an internal drive. They run really well, they are clearly faster than the 1tb and 2tb Seagates and Samsungs I copied data from (and bear in mind this is from none raid to raid 5).

The drives do not appear to get warm, although in a server, perhaps they're not going to get much use, but even when I was moving several tb onto them initially I didn't detect any major heat issues.

They seem to work well in the server, power consumption doesn't seem too bad, certainly switching from a Atom powered NAS to a AMD powered server with same number of disks, hasn't changed my power consumption for the house - I monitor this accurately so any major differences in a 24x7 device would show up. It seems the power management is pretty agressive anyway, but not to the extent where there's a noticeable delay when using it for the first time after a couple of hours quiet period - my old NAS would take long enough to warm up the disks XBMC would often complain UPnP server didn't exist.

All in all I'm very happy.

And as a complete aside, I consigned my original deathstar to the bin only recently, not due to failure, but due to a much bigger disk being available to replace it, it hadn't failed, so I had to ensure data was none recoverable with a sledge hammer, so don't necessarily worry about some 10 year old reputation.

Incidentally the caddies are relatively easy to open without damage, on putting it back together, the label looks as good as new, not that I'd waste my time RMA'ing it anyway, sledge hammer is the only safe option to ensure my data remains my data. I'm using one caddy intact, and one that got destroyed simply as an easy to use usb->sata converter for barebones drives. If anyone wants to know the trick to opening them just ask.

mike
banned#28
mbuckhurst
EMM386
Please see my post last time this was a deal on scan


EMM386
mbuckhurst
Just used 2 of these to get at the internal drives for my raid 5 HP microserver, fantastic performance, low power consumption and noise. If you're happy to take the risk of 3GB on a single drive, the power savings would pay for the drive in a couple of years compared to 2 external 1.5TB drives.

I've re-used one of the caddies to hold a smaller disk I had lying around, very easy to do.
mike

mbuckhurst
Pretty sure it's 7200rpm, it's the same drive as the internal 3TB Hitachi, that's more expensive, you might invalidate the warranty if Hitachi keep a record of serials for which drive becomes external or internal, but given the price difference I can take a risk since for 3 drives you've practically covered the cost of a spare.
mike

Hi Mike

Thanks for a very informative post.

I like you, am looking for drives to put in my HP N36L Microserver.

I was gonna use 5 x 2Tb Samsung SpinPoint F4

But I might use 5 of these instead now

A few things concern me though.

1) It look like the external doesn't just contain Hitachi's internal drive, unless numerous websites have the tech specs wrong (whichis entirely possible). The internal is a 4K sector drive and the external is reported to be a 512byte drive. This should increase compatibility with older OS'es (although the larger 2+Tb size may negate this). But reduce performace and perhaps more importantly error correction

2) It also appears to be a 7200rpm drive which would be good for a desktop but bad for a Server/NAS as it should increase power consumption.

3) Kinda related to above it uses 5 disc platters instead of the WD's 4. This again should mean it requires more power to move the 5 platters as compared to the 4.

4) Finally from photo reviews it looks like there is a void warranty sticker that needs to be broken to remove the drive, meaning a failure after even a month may not be honoured. A heat gun/hair dryer however may allow the stick to be removed intact


Ok, having had mine running 24x7 in a raid 5 array, 2 from caddies one bought as an internal drive. They run really well, they are clearly faster than the 1tb and 2tb Seagates and Samsungs I copied data from (and bear in mind this is from none raid to raid 5).

The drives do not appear to get warm, although in a server, perhaps they're not going to get much use, but even when I was moving several tb onto them initially I didn't detect any major heat issues.

They seem to work well in the server, power consumption doesn't seem too bad, certainly switching from a Atom powered NAS to a AMD powered server with same number of disks, hasn't changed my power consumption for the house - I monitor this accurately so any major differences in a 24x7 device would show up. It seems the power management is pretty agressive anyway, but not to the extent where there's a noticeable delay when using it for the first time after a couple of hours quiet period - my old NAS would take long enough to warm up the disks XBMC would often complain UPnP server didn't exist.

All in all I'm very happy.

And as a complete aside, I consigned my original deathstar to the bin only recently, not due to failure, but due to a much bigger disk being available to replace it, it hadn't failed, so I had to ensure data was none recoverable with a sledge hammer, so don't necessarily worry about some 10 year old reputation.

Incidentally the caddies are relatively easy to open without damage, on putting it back together, the label looks as good as new, not that I'd waste my time RMA'ing it anyway, sledge hammer is the only safe option to ensure my data remains my data. I'm using one caddy intact, and one that got destroyed simply as an easy to use usb->sata converter for barebones drives. If anyone wants to know the trick to opening them just ask.

mike


Wouldnt a another viable solution be to use a software like safe erase to overwrite the data on the drive like 35 times, exceeding military level of security?
#29
mbuckhurst



Incidentally the caddies are relatively easy to open without damage, on putting it back together, the label looks as good as new.......... If anyone wants to know the trick to opening them just ask.

mike


I'd like to know the trick please Mike!
#30
jukkie


How odd that over the last couple of years it's been the Hitachi HDD's that I've installed that have had the lowest failure rate (and I've installed hundreds of HDD's in that time).

I've had 7 x 7K100's myself since 2009, and none of them have had any problems yet (unlike the WD Caviar Green drives I tried a couple of times...).

I've not installed hundreds, but of the drives I have installed, the Hitachis have been the most reliable.
1 Like #31
thelonious
mbuckhurst



Incidentally the caddies are relatively easy to open without damage, on putting it back together, the label looks as good as new.......... If anyone wants to know the trick to opening them just ask.

mike


I'd like to know the trick please Mike!


on the front of the caddy (the opposite of the bit where you plug in power and usb), get a screwdriver and put in the side grooves and just pop the front bit off, then you find 2 screws. unscrew both, then hold the bottom part and slide the top part back, they are on clip on things that are about 2mm, push back and the top comes off, that breaks the sticker for the warranty unless you get it off with a hairdryer. then from there it's pretty obvious you need to unscrew a few bits and the drive is in a metal cage thing, it looks strange, but it's obvious to unscrew apart
#32
3TB?!?!?! Jeeez! GL if you fill it and it dies! :P
#33
BlueDan
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"
As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM.

Who are one of the premier computer companies of all time.

chicaneuk
Not that I'm one to hold a grudge but I suffered at the hands of the legendary 40GB IBM hard disks many moons ago. I don't think I'll ever buy a Hitachi drive based on that fiasco!

So you do actually hold a grudge then even though you suggested otherwise.
Just man up and tell it like it is.

If you don’t want to buy products from computer companies that have sold products that had issues in the past then I suggest you stick with using an abacus; which definitely doesn’t run Crysis.
So best avoid:

Intel
AMD
nVidia
etc etc.
#34
It's not their hard disks now that would put me off, it's how they handled it before.
#35
BlueDan
It's not their hard disks now that would put me off, it's how they handled it before.

That was IBM, this is Hitachi a different company so your argument seems completely irrelevant!
#36
mamboboy
It astonishes me that the click of death/deathstar thing still lingers on today. The Sandy Bridge intel saga was far more serious IMO as that was the long term degradation of more than one component - yet i rarely see people leave "cold, intel motherboards kill computers!" in intel related deals for example.

So an Intel chipset issue that was supposedly very unlikely to occur in most scenarios even after 5 years and didn’t result in data loss is worse than a complete hard drive failure resulting in total data loss? Hmmm, I know which I’d prefer.

On top of that Intel took it on the chin and took full responsibility at great expense for the fault immediately unlike many IT companies that wait for a class action suit before they even consider stopping worming their way out of it.
Maybe that’s why Intel in some way have ironically actually enhanced their reputation due to the fault. It’s how companies respond when they screw up that helps define them.
Intel seemed to do the right thing unlike Asus UK who from my experience were clueless about how to handle a product recall. I ended up returning my Asus board to Amazon and bought a Gigabyte from Scan. Intel +5. Asus -10. Amazon +5.
1 Like #37
steev08
3TB?!?!?! Jeeez! GL if you fill it and it dies! :P


you just do the same as with any other HD that dies, use your backup and get a new drive to replace the faulty one
#38
BlueDan
Wicked Lester
BlueDan
"Backed by Hitachi's reputation for quality, reliability and a world-renowned R & D heritage for advanced hard disk drives"

As long as none of that knowledge was inherited from IBM...


Sigh. 2001 called, they'd like their comment back.


Who are you, Hitachi's mum?

Tons of IBM hard disks failed, some within days, some brand new but DOA.

IBM tried to make out some of the ones that lasted a bit longer had failed outside of a permissible number of hours as if they had been used in a server to try and get out of warranty obligations. It turned out the number of hours was pathetically low and normal desktop use would get though them well within the warranty period.

The whole thing was eventually settled by a class action lawsuit.

The glass platters called, they'd like their ferric coating back.


Whoosh.
#39
I once had a problem with my IBM branded 5 1/4 inch diskette.....never again!
#40
aeonf242
I once had a problem with my IBM branded 5 1/4 inch diskette.....never again!

Yeah. Because the 8 inch floppy was perfect and never caused any problems. Not ever.

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