4tb External Hard Drives from £99.99 at Amazon, Currys, PC World etc - HotUKDeals
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4tb External Hard Drives from £99.99 at Amazon, Currys, PC World etc

£99.99 @ Amazon
4tb external Seagate Hard Drive from Amazon £99.99 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seagate-STBV4000200-Expansion-desktop-external/dp/B00BP5RL10 4tb external Seagate Hard Drive from Currys £99.99 http…
Diamond_Studd Avatar
2y, 2m agoFound 2 years, 2 months ago

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banned#1
Good timing, just what I was looking for.... :D
#2
already posted
#3
So you want to say the item can be baught for the same price elswhere?
2 Likes #4
pablomalin
So you want to say the item can be baught for the same price elswhere?
No but they might say it can be bought for the same price elsewhere.
#5
Seeing as all are the same price (well, to a penny), has someone compared the current quidco / topcashback rates for the merchants above to maximise cash back? :-)
2 Likes #6
Each to their own and all, but in my experience with hdds, and it's a lot.
The larger the drive, the more it becomes a storage device for everything and anything.
Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.
But as i say, each to their own.
#7
Hot Deal. 4TB for £100, bargain.
1 Like #8
back up your back ups i know it sounds crazy but l found out the hard way after an ext HD went bellyup.
11 Likes #9
Visiondvd

Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.

Data on a disk doesn't make it slower. If the data becomes fragmented, then accessing that particular data can be slower compared to being not fragmented.


Visiondvd
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.

Then backup. The same advice that has been issues since the dawn of computing.


Visiondvd
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.

That is some of the worst advice I've ever heard. If you need a backup, you buy 2 drives and have an *actual* backup.

The claim you should spread data across two drives, so you "have some" if one fails is insane. That's not a backup, that's hedging your bets on which drive is going to die first. I'm not even going to get into how statistics work and the MTBF on drives.

I'm always at a loss with posts like this, you're over complicating a very simple issue.

If you need 100% backup of a drive, buy 2 drives and keep a backup.
If you need an offsite backup (because of theft, fire and so on), use Gdrive, Dropbox, or one of many other cloud services out there. They're very cheap.
In all likelihood, you don't need a 100% backup of a drive - certainly if you have games and such installed that can be re-downloaed. In such a case, a smaller, cheaper drive is sufficient to back up the critical data only.

People have been harping the "it's a lot of data to lose" line since the first drives were invented. ANY data is a lot to lose if it's critical.

Keep backups. It's that simple. And remember that RAID isn't a backup, it's redundancy.
#10
^like he said^
#11
Isn't what you're describing RAID 1 ? ;)
2 Likes #12
feidhlimdh
Isn't what you're describing RAID 1 ? ;)

No.

RAID 1 offers redundancy. In this context, the death of a disk. It is not a backup solution as such.

A second drive used as a backup drive in the correct way, will protect against the loss of data should it be lost on the first drive (through drive failure or accidental deletion).

Consider the following: Your RAID 1 array is effectively one drive to your OS. You accidently delete a large critical file off it, which doesn't go to the recycle bin. Where is your god now?
Without resorting to restore tools (if you manage to get it back), the data is gone. It has *no backup*.

There is a lot on the net about redundancy vs backups. Know the difference and keep your data safe.

http://www.cnet.com/uk/how-to/digital-storage-basics-part-3-backup-vs-redundancy/
#13
Anyone know if this works ok for Xbox One? I think the only stipulations for Xbox are it needs USB 3.0, this seems to have it. Just want to know if anyone knows for sure :)
#14
Yes I'm keen to get a hardrive for xbox one. Maybe 4tb is a bit much but is this recommended?
#15
nomnomnomnom
Visiondvd

Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.

Data on a disk doesn't make it slower. If the data becomes fragmented, then accessing that particular data can be slower compared to being not fragmented.


Visiondvd
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.

Then backup. The same advice that has been issues since the dawn of computing.


Visiondvd
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.

That is some of the worst advice I've ever heard. If you need a backup, you buy 2 drives and have an *actual* backup.

The claim you should spread data across two drives, so you "have some" if one fails is insane. That's not a backup, that's hedging your bets on which drive is going to die first. I'm not even going to get into how statistics work and the MTBF on drives.

I'm always at a loss with posts like this, you're over complicating a very simple issue.

If you need 100% backup of a drive, buy 2 drives and keep a backup.
If you need an offsite backup (because of theft, fire and so on), use Gdrive, Dropbox, or one of many other cloud services out there. They're very cheap.
In all likelihood, you don't need a 100% backup of a drive - certainly if you have games and such installed that can be re-downloaed. In such a case, a smaller, cheaper drive is sufficient to back up the critical data only.

People have been harping the "it's a lot of data to lose" line since the first drives were invented. ANY data is a lot to lose if it's critical.

Keep backups. It's that simple. And remember that RAID isn't a backup, it's redundancy.
I'm overcomplicating things...lol ffs get a life
banned#16
nack to the question above. will this work in xbox one. thank you
banned#17
arrrrr. i ment back
2 Likes #18
nomnomnomnom
Visiondvd

Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.

Data on a disk doesn't make it slower. If the data becomes fragmented, then accessing that particular data can be slower compared to being not fragmented.


Visiondvd
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.

Then backup. The same advice that has been issues since the dawn of computing.


Visiondvd
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.

That is some of the worst advice I've ever heard. If you need a backup, you buy 2 drives and have an *actual* backup.

The claim you should spread data across two drives, so you "have some" if one fails is insane. That's not a backup, that's hedging your bets on which drive is going to die first. I'm not even going to get into how statistics work and the MTBF on drives.

I'm always at a loss with posts like this, you're over complicating a very simple issue.

If you need 100% backup of a drive, buy 2 drives and keep a backup.
If you need an offsite backup (because of theft, fire and so on), use Gdrive, Dropbox, or one of many other cloud services out there. They're very cheap.
In all likelihood, you don't need a 100% backup of a drive - certainly if you have games and such installed that can be re-downloaed. In such a case, a smaller, cheaper drive is sufficient to back up the critical data only.

People have been harping the "it's a lot of data to lose" line since the first drives were invented. ANY data is a lot to lose if it's critical.

Keep backups. It's that simple. And remember that RAID isn't a backup, it's redundancy.

Yes , *people keep forgetting that when they backup data up , it is a backup . But , when they delete the master to make space , the backup is the master and they have no backup .
I`ve done as noted above - bought 2x 4TB drives and they`re exact copies of each other - with some of my home iphone movies weighing in a 4-500mg , any smaller and I`d be doubling up in no time .

*including myself , lost a 1TB drive a year ago , that had inadvertently become my master , that made me very sad :(
#19
Visiondvd

ffs get a life

Calm down dear <3
#20
happyshopperlover0151
Yes I'm keen to get a hardrive for xbox one. Maybe 4tb is a bit much but is this recommended?


My cousin bought one and uses it for his xbox one said it's fine
#21
1 Like #22
Visiondvd
Each to their own and all, but in my experience with hdds, and it's a lot.
The larger the drive, the more it becomes a storage device for everything and anything.
Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.
But as i say, each to their own.

please leave the advice business, you are giving human's a bad name ;)
#23
Visiondvd
Each to their own and all, but in my experience with hdds, and it's a lot.
The larger the drive, the more it becomes a storage device for everything and anything.
Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.
But as i say, each to their own.

For me it would be buy two 4Tb drives and spread across those and even that would be insufficient space.

Drives are getting bigger and so is data.
#24
nothing special, these drives where 99.99 before christmas, personally wouldnt by the 4tb seagate as it cant be removed from the casing and used internal if the case goes funny, firmware issue.
#25
kiteallthetime
nack to the question above. will this work in xbox one. thank you

Found this article, hopefully may be helpful. ;)
#26
Visiondvd
Each to their own and all, but in my experience with hdds, and it's a lot.
The larger the drive, the more it becomes a storage device for everything and anything.
Hence user becomes lazy and stores all data on them,and ends up slower.
Then one day, bang,, it stops working, and you most probably lose all your data.
My advice is to purchase smaller hdds when on offer, example on this site at moment, is 1 TB for £50, and maybe buy two .
Share your data across two drives and if one fails, at least you have some data.
But as i say, each to their own.

That is stupid. As someone else mentioned, if you need data is in any way important to you them you MUST have a backup. Get two drives and back one up to the other, there are various programs that can help with that. Try Syncback from www2brightsparks.com. Even the free version is very good.

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