5 Litres Total Quartz RACING 10W50 Fully Synthetic Engine Oil - £27.99 delivered @ ebay / nielsencdg - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play
For those with high performance engines (eg, forged rebuilds), then this is very reasonably priced for a fully synthetic when most other brands are over £50. Seller also sells the same in bulk if you want more than one can - but not much cheaper.
Deal Tags:
More From eBay:

All Comments

(14) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Worst brand on the market of oil industry.
banned 1 Like #2
Rimi
Worst brand on the market of oil industry.

Could you provide some evidence of that?
#3
Very good oil for low money.
2 Likes #4
drovid
Very good oil for low money.

http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/castrol-magnatec-4l-5w-30-a1-engine-17-27-inc-del-from-amazon-with-code-1946221

Best brand and super quality oil almost twice cheaper
#5
Rimi
drovid
Very good oil for low money.

http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/castrol-magnatec-4l-5w-30-a1-engine-17-27-inc-del-from-amazon-with-code-1946221

Best brand and super quality oil almost twice cheaper

Different oil. This is 10w50 for high performance engines. 5w30 is more common for modern stock engines.
1 Like #6
Rimi
Worst brand on the market of oil industry.


Dick
#7
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.
#8
Joe90_guy
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.

This is exactly right. 10w50 would be used in older high performance engines - I use it in a 5.3 XJS for example. It is not suitable for modern engines, its too thick. High performance engines tend to use 0w/40 or 5w/30 Offering max cold start protection (very thin at freezing) but getting thicker at 100C to protect high performance parts.

Edited By: Tyranicus66 on Jul 05, 2014 09:59
#9
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.

This is exactly right. 10w50 would be used in older high performance engines - I use it in a 5.3 XJS for example. It is not suitable for modern engines, its too thick. High performance engines tend to use 0w/40 or 5w/30 Offering max cold start protection (very thin at freezing) but getting thicker at 100C to protect high performance parts.

Just out of curiosity, how long would you keep this 10W50 in your Jag? Lots of racers change oil after a days racing. If this was the case, I'd probably look to use a cheap 20W50 or even a monograde SAE 40. It's less volatile, very probably contains more ZDDP, less dispersant and less rubber than the 10W50; all of which would be advantageous if you are going to thrash your engine on a track.
#10
Joe90_guy
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.

This is exactly right. 10w50 would be used in older high performance engines - I use it in a 5.3 XJS for example. It is not suitable for modern engines, its too thick. High performance engines tend to use 0w/40 or 5w/30 Offering max cold start protection (very thin at freezing) but getting thicker at 100C to protect high performance parts.

Just out of curiosity, how long would you keep this 10W50 in your Jag? Lots of racers change oil after a days racing. If this was the case, I'd probably look to use a cheap 20W50 or even a monograde SAE 40. It's less volatile, very probably contains more ZDDP, less dispersant and less rubber than the 10W50; all of which would be advantageous if you are going to thrash your engine on a track.

I don't race it. Just pootle about in it as a summer car but because by modern standards the engine is pretty extreme (exceptionally hot) I change the oil every year, along with coolant, filters etc.. If you going to race, just change it after the day - normally its the brake fluid that's of real concern because it gets cooked very quickly indeed racing.
#11
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.

This is exactly right. 10w50 would be used in older high performance engines - I use it in a 5.3 XJS for example. It is not suitable for modern engines, its too thick. High performance engines tend to use 0w/40 or 5w/30 Offering max cold start protection (very thin at freezing) but getting thicker at 100C to protect high performance parts.

Just out of curiosity, how long would you keep this 10W50 in your Jag? Lots of racers change oil after a days racing. If this was the case, I'd probably look to use a cheap 20W50 or even a monograde SAE 40. It's less volatile, very probably contains more ZDDP, less dispersant and less rubber than the 10W50; all of which would be advantageous if you are going to thrash your engine on a track.

I don't race it. Just pootle about in it as a summer car but because by modern standards the engine is pretty extreme (exceptionally hot) I change the oil every year, along with coolant, filters etc.. If you going to race, just change it after the day - normally its the brake fluid that's of real concern because it gets cooked very quickly indeed racing.

If that's the case, I might suggest you drop down to bog-standard GTX 10W40. The main difference between 10W40 and 10W50 is something called viscosity improver; a long chain polymer which doesn't react well to heat. In the worst case, after a few thousand miles, your 10W50 will have degraded/sheared down into 10W40 (in terms of it's viscosity) plus some semi-decomposed rubber which will crud out. I wouldn't worry about the full synthetic vs semi-synthetic thing either. These days, semi-synthetics are a lot closer to being full synthetics than they were ten years ago and are generally rock solid in terms of their oxidative stability.
Can't help you with the brake fluid thing as it's not something I've ever dabbled in.
#12
Joe90_guy
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Tyranicus66
Joe90_guy
Odd that this is advertised for racing. Would have thought that such a heavy oil would have created a lot of viscous drag inside the engine, sapping engine power. A thinner oil would be better.

This is exactly right. 10w50 would be used in older high performance engines - I use it in a 5.3 XJS for example. It is not suitable for modern engines, its too thick. High performance engines tend to use 0w/40 or 5w/30 Offering max cold start protection (very thin at freezing) but getting thicker at 100C to protect high performance parts.

Just out of curiosity, how long would you keep this 10W50 in your Jag? Lots of racers change oil after a days racing. If this was the case, I'd probably look to use a cheap 20W50 or even a monograde SAE 40. It's less volatile, very probably contains more ZDDP, less dispersant and less rubber than the 10W50; all of which would be advantageous if you are going to thrash your engine on a track.

I don't race it. Just pootle about in it as a summer car but because by modern standards the engine is pretty extreme (exceptionally hot) I change the oil every year, along with coolant, filters etc.. If you going to race, just change it after the day - normally its the brake fluid that's of real concern because it gets cooked very quickly indeed racing.

If that's the case, I might suggest you drop down to bog-standard GTX 10W40. The main difference between 10W40 and 10W50 is something called viscosity improver; a long chain polymer which doesn't react well to heat. In the worst case, after a few thousand miles, your 10W50 will have degraded/sheared down into 10W40 (in terms of it's viscosity) plus some semi-decomposed rubber which will crud out. I wouldn't worry about the full synthetic vs semi-synthetic thing either. These days, semi-synthetics are a lot closer to being full synthetics than they were ten years ago and are generally rock solid in terms of their oxidative stability.
Can't help you with the brake fluid thing as it's not something I've ever dabbled in.

I agree with just about everything which is rare, however you are obviously not too familiar with old Jags :) The 10w50 helps plug a few of the leaks, which they all have - particularly around the 1/2moon rubbers on the cam covers. I have experimented with a few different oils and anything thinner tends to leak more, I get around the heat degradation with frequent changes :)

Edited By: Tyranicus66 on Jul 05, 2014 12:19
#13
Seen as there seems to be a few oil 'experts' here, may I ask a question?

I'm going to import a Mazda MX-5 Mk.3.5 (most likely the 2.0 model) into Spain soon, so can someone tell me which type of oil is best for using this car down here? The winters are pretty mild, never going below 10 degrees, but the summer can get quite hot (around 40 degrees C isn't uncommon).

Thanks in advance ;-)
#14
Naith
Seen as there seems to be a few oil 'experts' here, may I ask a question?

I'm going to import a Mazda MX-5 Mk.3.5 (most likely the 2.0 model) into Spain soon, so can someone tell me which type of oil is best for using this car down here? The winters are pretty mild, never going below 10 degrees, but the summer can get quite hot (around 40 degrees C isn't uncommon).

Thanks in advance ;-)

I will give you the usual advice I give people which is use a decent semi-synthetic 10W40 like GTX (but there are many others) and change it every 12,000 miles. Unless you live in Scandinavia, you will never actually need a 5W- or 0W- oil for cold start. These only really exist because it's not so easy to make full synthetic 10W- & 15W- oils (which is what people in temperate climates actually need). Likewise I wouldn't worry too much about the 40C summers. Your oil temperature will follow the engine coolant temperature which is thermostatically controlled in every engine. Most sumps rarely get much above 100C because water boils at 100C. Even if you do go above this, most modern oils have their oxidative stability tested at 150C and they're fine. I'm assuming the Mazda is petrol in which case you're doubly protected. First off. Jap cars tend to be bomb-proof mechanically and second, most modern oils are 'dual-function' in that they can be used for both Diesel and petrol engines. The petrol duty is easier to meet so in that sense, the oil is over formulated. Hope this helps.

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!