60w Solar Panel Kit - 6% Quidco £187.99 inc Delivery @ Maplins - HotUKDeals
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Just amended price as I found a code for £12 off bringing it down to £187

code = secret12

Been looking for one of these for a while. This is cheapest by far. If you want something like this for caravan, boat, charging items in Shed its an absolute bargain.


A solar generator kit to power your applications using sunlight - no extra running costs
Turns natural sunlight into electricity and charges any 12V deep cycle batteries
Green energy and environmental friendly product
Ideal for motor homes, caravans, boats and backup power requirements if mains power may not be readily available
Weatherproof amorphous solar panels work even in cloudy and overcast weather conditions
Can be used to power lights, small TVs, electric fans, laptops, stereos (mains invertor required - sold separately)
Contents: 4 x 15W amorphous weatherproof solar panels Mounting hardware (12 x M5x45 screws, 16 x M5x55 screw and 28 x M5 dome nut) 10A charge regulator 10A fuse 5m extension cable 4-in-1 connector with 68cm lead 1m adaptor to charge regulator cable 30cm adaptor to male CLA cable 30cm adaptor to battery clamp cable 4 x fabric strips

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Technical Specification

Technical specifications:
Power: 60W
Peak output: 3.42A @ 17.5V
Individual solar panel size (4pcs): 34.3(w) x 97.3(l) x 1.8(d) cm
Dimensions fully assembled: 142(w) x 77(l) x 79(d) cm
Net weight: 28.4kg
Power generated from this system in one week can run following items:
Appliance Power consumption Hours of use
CB radio: 5W 336
Depth finder: 5W 336
Laptop computer: 50W 33.6
Lights: (compact 40W equivalent) 10W 168
TV:(12 inch) 20W 84
Cooler:12V (3A) electric 36W 46.6
Stereo: 50W 33.6
Satellite dish: 30W 56
Battery charge times:
Battery capacity: Charge time (days):
33Ah 2.5
50Ah 3.75
110Ah 8
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daveabster Avatar
6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
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#1
maplins sell this type of stuff too so worth researching before you take the plunge :o)
#2
mrcareful
maplins sell this type of stuff too so worth researching before you take the plunge :o)

it is from maplins LOL
#3
you can never be too careful, MrCareFul. lol

it says you need an inverter and batteries, has anyone set one of these up.

will it power a 42" tv during the day.
#4
I can't find this deal on the link
#5
Teqnophile
you can never be too careful, MrCareFul. lol

it says you need an inverter and batteries, has anyone set one of these up.

will it power a 42" tv during the day.


No, it won't.
#6
Inverters are brilliant! I've used them to power life support machines, although I used 12v car/wheelchair batteries not 17.5V solar panels. As long as you check that its within working parameters of the inverter it should work.
#7
I'm looking out for some cheap solar panels for a clinic, these with shipping seem a bit expensive, especially as prices will come down over the next six months. Still a Hot deal for now though!
#8
OperateOnMe;7360307
I'm looking out for some cheap solar panels for a clinic, these with shipping seem a bit expensive, especially as prices will come down over the next six months. Still a Hot deal for now though!


free delivery - I ordered one as this is a bargain - usually nearer £300 for this kind of kit
#9
Those looking for a lil solar gadget to power/charge laptops and iphone etc might want to look at the Solar Gorilla and Power Gorilla by Power traveller.

Ive got both which (with a cable they sent me) will charge my Macbook pro and the power gorilla battery gives an extra 6 hours power to my laptop.

charging the PG off the Solar panel will take a couple of days or so though in the UK.

I've heard there are a new type of panel coming out that also works at night time ( no it wasnt an april fools) so maybe prices will start to come down.
#10
Does anyone any website abt using this for household use? The more I read the more confussed I get. :(
1 Like #11
You can get a 60w panel on Ebay for £150, doesn't come with anything else. You will only save about £10-15 a year with a 60w panel.

This is better and much cheaper , build a solar air heater, I guess for about £50

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=solar+can+heater&search_type=&aq=f
#12
OperateOnMe
..., these with shipping seem a bit expensive, especially as prices will come down over the next six months.


No offense, but can you quote the source for this info please?

Solar panels AREgoing to become more common, but I'd suggest that it's only when electricity bills start climbing upwards that the cost of solar panels will "seem" cheaper in comparison.

As demand for solar panels kicks in, why would any manufacturer consider dropping prices? So a fall in solar panel price seems to my mind to be a lot more than 6 months away, surely?
#13
i'm really interested in this as my garage is setup with my home office and i heat it will electrical bar heaters. Would this panel be good enough to power those? My garage accounts for at least £50 a month electricity so if this panela could take some a significant load off my mains supply it could pay for itself in months or a year. But does anyone really know much more and could offfer advice?
#14
moko7t8
i'm really interested in this as my garage is setup with my home office and i heat it will electrical bar heaters. Would this panel be good enough to power those? My garage accounts for at least £50 a month electricity so if this panela could take some a significant load off my mains supply it could pay for itself in months or a year. But does anyone really know much more and could offfer advice?


If your garage can be heated with a 60 watt light bulb then yes, this might be sufficient. However, I guess it's not ;-)
#15
pghstochaj
If your garage can be heated with a 60 watt light bulb then yes, this might be sufficient. However, I guess it's not ;-)


just that quick reply is enough to make me realise its pointless for me to even consider this much more as it simply would not be enough of a savings. Pity.
#16
moko7t8
i'm really interested in this as my garage is setup with my home office and i heat it will electrical bar heaters. Would this panel be good enough to power those? My garage accounts for at least £50 a month electricity so if this panela could take some a significant load off my mains supply it could pay for itself in months or a year. But does anyone really know much more and could offfer advice?


A 2kw heater will last about 30mins on a full sunny days charge. Plus it will kill your batteries with that kind of regular quick drain. This panel is 60w, enough to power a light bulb!!

Build a solar air heater, click the link above
#17
moko7t8
i'm really interested in this as my garage is setup with my home office and i heat it will electrical bar heaters. Would this panel be good enough to power those? My garage accounts for at least £50 a month electricity so if this panela could take some a significant load off my mains supply it could pay for itself in months or a year. But does anyone really know much more and could offfer advice?


Absolutely no way you will be able to run a 1kw-3kw Bar heater from a 50w solar panel. I've done loads with solar, and the only heater you are likely to run from one of these panels is a 12v car heater/demister if your lucky.
#18
Good to mount on the roof of your shed so that during the day you can use a light bulb inside to see better. All that for just £200!

The only other alternative would be to fit a window, I suppose.
#19
bit pointless in the uk tbh. ill come round to your house and pedal a bike to generate the electricity for £200.

people who buy these atm are either science freaks, have too much money, or (more than likely) are slightly mentally retarded.

spend 50p on a couple of cans of beans and fart your way to warmth with the added bonus of getting a meal.
#20
moko7t8
just that quick reply is enough to make me realise its pointless for me to even consider this much more as it simply would not be enough of a savings. Pity.


It is a shame, the technology for converting sunlight to electricity is fairly poor.

As a quick guide, 1 W costs you £1 a year (that is just a rule of thumb, nothing more). Assuming you get an average daylight of 12 hours a day (it's approximately 12.2 I think). You will have power losses in the conversion (depending on what you use it for) but I will assume these are zero. On the basis that for 12 hours a day you generate the maximum 60 W, it will take you nearly 7 years to get your money back. Of course 60 W is a pie in the sky figure for the majority of the time and 7 years would be impossible, but power will increase in price.

Feed in tarrifs make the above a little more complicated, but not much so for 60 W.
#21
zygo
Good to mount on the roof of your shed so that during the day you can use a light bulb inside to see better. All that for just £200!

Buying just a single panel like this (plus then spending at least as much again for all the other bits you'll need) is justa gimmick. It'll never pay for itself, or recoup the energy used in its manufacture. If you're serious, you'll be looking at £12,500 for a full system, and then get a £2500 grant.
Strangely, the deal that Southern Electric have uses panels of 1.31 sq.m. to give 170 Watts. This panel comes out at the same size but is only rated at 60Watts. I would assume therefore that it's a low grade or very inefficient panel that they're trying to dump for cheap.
#22
pghstochaj
It is a shame, the technology for converting sunlight to electricity is fairly poor.

As a quick guide, 1 W costs you £1 a year (that is just a rule of thumb, nothing more). Assuming you get an average daylight of 12 hours a day (it's approximately 12.2 I think). You will have power losses in the conversion (depending on what you use it for) but I will assume these are zero. On the basis that for 12 hours a day you generate the maximum 60 W, it will take you nearly 7 years to get your money back. Of course 60 W is a pie in the sky figure for the majority of the time and 7 years would be impossible, but power will increase in price.

Feed in tarrifs make the above a little more complicated, but not much so for 60 W.


Thanks for the informative post. Even the part where you mention 1W costing approx £1 a year gives me an insight to the power I'm using in general in my garage office.
#23
moko7t8
Thanks for the informative post. Even the part where you mention 1W costing approx £1 a year gives me an insight to the power I'm using in general in my garage office.


You're welcome.
#24
moko - have you researched the electricity meters - OWL is one brand. It has helped me save 30% on costs this year, by being aware of consumption and when there may be excess lights on. ie cost £50 or so (cheaper now) and saved £200 at least
#25
mark88man
moko - have you researched the electricity meters - OWL is one brand. It has helped me save 30% on costs this year, by being aware of consumption and when there may be excess lights on. ie cost £50 or so (cheaper now) and saved £200 at least


no i haven't done any research (or at least much research) into this but since my monthly bill is in excess of £150 my new years resolution is to tackle it and bring it down. Thanks for the tip on OWL as a brand.
#26
It would be completely pointless to use a PV panel to generate electricity and then use that for heating. Just let the sunlight in through a window and get 100% efficiency at almost no capital cost. Turn the greenhouse effect to your advantage,
#27
My local library lent out OWLs last month, they put people off putting the kettle on, apparantly!
#28
Dude1971
My local library lent out OWLs last month, they put people off putting the kettle on, apparantly!


for someone who enjoys maybe 5 or 6 cups of tea a night, this statement frightens me
#29
Teqnophile
you can never be too careful, MrCareFul. lol

it says you need an inverter and batteries, has anyone set one of these up.

will it power a 42" tv during the day.




pghstochaj
No, it won't.


Yes, it will work, (with an inverter & battery) but you'll be limited to the amount of hours you can use it. A 42" LCD typically takes 120W. So in theory a 60w solar panel would beable to power the TV for half the amount of daylight hours (e.g 10 hours of sun would give 5 hours viewing). There are other losses though, especially during charging/discharging of the battery which isn't 100% efficient, which would reduce the above time.
#30
Moko - you should also look at the forums on moneysavingexpert.com quite a big site but they have lots of hints about cost (=power) reduction.
they would suggest you boil up the kettle and store hot water in a thermos so you can use or reboil. they would also suggest more jumpers or layers, turn the heat down with two hours to go, ...
Also you should consider swapping suppliers - although I have been with eon for over 2 years now I regularly check competitors and have sometimes swapped between different eon tariffs
Seriously it is as much about mindset (which you have clearly now got) as tools to support it, but like quitting smoking its nice to have some support.
#31
Nellster
bit pointless in the uk tbh. ill come round to your house and pedal a bike to generate the electricity for £200.

people who buy these atm are either science freaks, have too much money, or (more than likely) are slightly mentally retarded.

spend 50p on a couple of cans of beans and fart your way to warmth with the added bonus of getting a meal.


A small solar panel is very useful for people with a caravan or boat that they use occasionally and is kept / moored where a 240v power supply is not available. It'll keep a battery charged and counter the power drain of burglar alarms etc.
If you have a shed with no mains connection and want a light / alarm it would probably be cheaper to buy this + battery etc. rather than pay an electrician to connect the mains.
#32
I am not sure I am convinced. The panel has amorphous cells - the cheapest kind, which is quite out of date. There is no voltage converter, so you will loose more power due to the voltage mismatch.

The price is ok, but you should really aim for something with a bit more quality.
#33
could you insulate your shed moko?

apologies if this is stupid.question..... :- /
#34
Derek_Duval
Yes, it will work, (with an inverter & battery) but you'll be limited to the amount of hours you can use it. A 42" LCD typically takes 120W. So in theory a 60w solar panel would beable to power the TV for half the amount of daylight hours (e.g 10 hours of sun would give 5 hours viewing). There are other losses though, especially during charging/discharging of the battery which isn't 100% efficient, which would reduce the above time.

Nowhere near conservative enough unfortunately! Of course it would power it, it could power anything, but it would not be sustaining.
#35
I bought a b grade one last year for my cravan. It kept my battery charged for over 2 weeks . I watched satelite TV every day it was brill. The down side is its massive and heavy, Very Heavy!!!!
#36
I have 2 of these panels, I've been evaluating their performance over the last twelve months.
I have them connected to 2 12v batteries and a 150w inverter.
First thing I can say is forget about any real output between nov and feb, and they really are an expensive toy, at the moment!
I've added that proviso cos if leccy prices were to increase substantially, they would look a better investment.
In the summer sun they will power a laptop including modem, radio, answer machine all at the same time. Then in the evening there's enough power stored for said radio and a couple of 11w lights.
I have tried, unsuccessfully I might add, using an 800w inverter to power a 500w bread maker or a 750w kettle, there just aint enough power!
It is tempting though, just to add one more panel and battery.
Incidently, they do come equiped with charge controllers, 12v socket, usb and various other voltage connections, hope this gives you some idea of capability.
#37
haven't seen this mentioned yet but the rated 60w is at ~17.5v not 240v. So when looking at 240v appliances and seeing the wattage on the sticker, that needs to be calculated at 12v to see if the solar panel + battery can supply the current when using an inverter.

If you wish to power anything requiring more than 60w @12v that power needs to come from the battery and depending on they type of cell you use it may or may not be able to supply the required current.

Inverters are OK but are inefficient and i dont they do the battery much good if used regularly, but if the solar panel is supplying enough current it wont touch your battery.

I use a smaller panel than this at my caravan (~30w) id say 60w is ok but the product is fairly large to generate that 60w, i intend to upgrade next year to 60w or greater but would be looking for something alot smaller, this obviously would mean more money.

I dont think this offer is that cheap.
#38
pghstochaj
As a quick guide, 1 W costs you £1 a year (that is just a rule of thumb, nothing more). Assuming you get an average daylight of 12 hours a day (it's approximately 12.2 I think). You will have power losses in the conversion (depending on what you use it for) but I will assume these are zero. On the basis that for 12 hours a day you generate the maximum 60 W, it will take you nearly 7 years to get your money back. Of course 60 W is a pie in the sky figure for the majority of the time and 7 years would be impossible, but power will increase in price.

Feed in tarrifs make the above a little more complicated, but not much so for 60 W.


I dont understand what you are saying here. 1W costs you £1 per year but this generates 60w a day (=£60) but it takes 7 years to get your money back. I am obviously reading this the wrong way but I am genuingly interested so would appreciate pointing out the error in my thinking.
#39
PS the b grade was only 142 quid in rhe summer!!
#40
BeerGoggles
I dont understand what you are saying here. 1W costs you £1 per year but this generates 60w a day (=£60) but it takes 7 years to get your money back. I am obviously reading this the wrong way but I am genuingly interested so would appreciate pointing out the error in my thinking.


To clarify, 1 W constantly for a year costs about 1 pound.

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