6kg Powder Fire Extinguisher £16.99 @ Lidl from 7/6/2010 - HotUKDeals
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6kg Powder Fire Extinguisher £16.99 @ Lidl from 7/6/2010

£16.99 @ LIDL
* Fire rating: 27A 183BC * Dry powder is a multi-purpose, class A B and C fire fighting medium suitable for most common fire risks * With easy-to-read pressure gauge * Complete with wal… Read More
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6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
* Fire rating: 27A 183BC
* Dry powder is a multi-purpose, class A B and C fire fighting medium suitable for most common fire risks
* With easy-to-read pressure gauge
* Complete with wall bracket
* 2 year manufacturers warranty

£25 + VAT + Delivery from other places online. some places want as much as £40+!
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6y, 11m agoFound 6 years, 11 months ago
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#1
Why cold? I can find none online under £25 + VAT plus delivery!

Ok, it's warmed up a touch now lol. This really is very, very cheap for one of these.
#2
out of interest whats the expiration on these? I managed to get some "tundra" ones from my local adsa for less, And I imagine, a lot smaller in size. expiration date of 10/03/12
class f, a & e
#3
They were an even bigger bargain when Lidl knocked them out for £12.99 a few years ago :thumbsup:
#4
May one day save your home, or even your life. Worth £17. Voted hot.
#5
2 Years manufacturer's warranty. I guess if it doesnt work and thus your house burns down, they'll send you a new extinguisher? :?
#6
vulcanproject
2 Years manufacturer's warranty. I guess if it doesnt work and thus your house burns down, they'll send you a new extinguisher? :?

pmsl!


Good price. HnR+
#7
*Not a expert* but:

1. The powder does not really go off, its powder (suppose it could somehow get damp but its in a sealed container so doubtful.

2. The CO2 canister that forces the powder out could loose charge overtime, but as this comes with a guage which you can check, you could be pretty confident it's going to work if it's in the green zone.

BTW while this is pretty effective at putting out fires, it will destroy almost everything in the room it's discharged in. (eg TV, Computers, Laptops, Projectors etc.) Still better than house burning down I suppose, or could save your life while escaping from a fire.

I wish Lidl would start selling cheap personal smoke hoods, as its the smoke that kills not the fire. A smoke hood gives you 15 minutes of breathable air while you try to escape or wait for resuce.
2 Likes #8
This is a very good deal - this size of extinguisher is the one you'll see in commercial premises.

It's the only type of extinguisher I would say is of great use in the home (unless you have the money and space for several types!). It will put out kitchen fires very well, electrical fires pretty well (though whatever you use it on will not work, ever again - this is where CO2 is useful), ordinary combustibles (not all dry chemical extinguishers deal with class A, and this one does, but badly), and also car fires.

It's also a good size - the smaller 500g ones just don't have enough in them to deal with anything serious, especially ordinary combustibles where you need a lot of powder.

The one other thing you need is a fire blanket. An extinguisher isn't an appropriate tool for putting out a chip pan fire - if you squirt this onto the oil, it will displace burning oil out of the pan and make things worse. If the whole cooker is already ablaze, then the extinguisher is better!

I'm not sure about this one, but most of these can be serviced. I would recommend inverting the extinguisher a few times each year to keep the powder from caking into a solid block. Also check the CO2 gauge. In commercial situations, the powder would be discharged every x years, and then the powder and CO2 cylinder replaced. You can get this done as well, but it will cost as much as a new extinguisher. Personally, I would replace every 5 years - I've yet to see one with a good CO2 reading fail at this point, and I've probably let off a couple of hundred of these.
#9
vulcanproject
2 Years manufacturer's warranty. I guess if it doesnt work and thus your house burns down, they'll send you a new extinguisher? :?


Knowing me and warranties my house will burn down on day one of year 3! :x
#10
£16.99 for less than a minute of fun? Nah sorry, not for me :P
#11
cybergibbons

.....Personally, I would replace every 5 years - I've yet to see one with a good CO2 reading fail at this point, and I've probably let off a couple of hundred of these.


Good advice....but can I ask why? Amateur fireman?
#12
SeanUSX
£16.99 for less than a minute of fun? Nah sorry, not for me :P


I agree, and it doesn't even include a free shopping trolley...:-D

Although I suppose Lidl wouldn't mind if you borrowed one of theirs!

I got one of these off Ebay, it was a condition the missus asked me to fulfil before I got my mig welder. It is nice to know that it's there, but as people say, if I have to put something out I will spend the next month or so cleaning up the mess and replacing virtually anything that gets 'powdered'.

Good price though.
#13
leecher
Good advice....but can I ask why? Amateur fireman?


I used to work on ships - there would be between 150 and 200 of these on each ship on a continuous rolling maintenance program. When they reach the end of life, you can either remove the CO2 cylinder and pour the powder away, or you can let them off. Letting them off tests the rest of the mechanism and also can be used during training.
#14
leecher
Good advice....but can I ask why? Amateur fireman?


He probably / possibly worked for one of the many fire protection companies out there.... I did for a while...and part of the job was to do on site training and let an extinguisher off just to show people what it did...which in the case of the powder ones was to make a heck of a mess.

BTW...as a previous poster mentioned...the powder will pretty much beggar up anything electrical it covers...and it's goodbye to the electrics! It's worth double checking with your insurance company that you're covered in this situation....... I've known insurance companies knock back claims on the basis the powder did the damage, not the extinguisher which they argued " was not used in accordance...... " an absolute con...so make sure!!

Voted hot...anything like this, which is kite marked and can / may save lives deserves to be voted hot ( no pun intended! ).

Well spotted to the OP....:thumbsup:
#15
Great Deal!
#16
mike23
It's worth double checking with your insurance company that you're covered in this situation....... I've known insurance companies knock back claims on the basis the powder did the damage, not the extinguisher which they argued " was not used in accordance...... " an absolute con...so make sure!!


That is bloody typical of insurance companies isn't it?! I think the only extinguisher that wouldn't do too much damage would be water, and you don't want to be using those on electricals in the first place!
#17
Whilst powder is very effective at putting out most fires it's not ideally suited for household application. CO2 and a fire blanket are probably better. A powder extinguisher will make a great deal of mess and, as already stated, will render anything its discharged on pretty much useless.

Would like to see some sort of national campaign to get a fire blanket at the very least into every household.

Heat added as it is a good price for this item :)

BFM
1 Like #18
BurningFeetMan
Whilst powder is very effective at putting out most fires it's not ideally suited for household application. CO2 and a fire blanket are probably better. A powder extinguisher will make a great deal of mess and, as already stated, will render anything its discharged on pretty much useless.


Strongly have to disagree with the use of CO2 as the only extinguisher in the home. They've got a number of disadvantages:
[LIST]
[*]Very expensive (prohibitively so)
[*]Very short discharge time - for someone untrained they will only get one shot at putting out the fire with a CO2 extinguisher. Dry powder lasts a lot longer.
[*]Very short throw - you have to be very close to a fire. Dry powder has a good throw.
[*]No cooling effect - if you try putting out a class A fire, it will likely re-ignite once the CO2 has cleared. This type of dry powder melts and provides a good cooling and smothering effect even once the extinguisher is empty.
[*]Stupidly powerful - if you try putting out a fire with loose combustibles (waste paper bin, out of control bonfire, curtains), a CO2 will blast bits of burning material all over the place.
[/LIST]

A major consideration in a household fire is that a lot of people will wait too long before reaching for the extinguisher. The fire then almost certain become predominantly class A, and you'll want a dry powder rather then CO2 extinguisher in this situation.

That said, I think home extinguishers will often result in people putting themselves at risk because they wait too long and have no training. It's hard to say if home extinguishers make much of a difference to fire safety. I certainly wouldn't be without one.

I do agree that a fire blanket is an absolute necessity. And it needs to be screwed to the wall, on an exit route from the kitchen - not in a cupboard. You'll only have seconds to think.
#19
cybergibbons
Strongly have to disagree with the use of CO2 as the only extinguisher in the home. They've got a number of disadvantages:
[LIST]
[*]Very expensive (prohibitively so)
[*]Very short discharge time - for someone untrained they will only get one shot at putting out the fire with a CO2 extinguisher. Dry powder lasts a lot longer.
[*]Very short throw - you have to be very close to a fire. Dry powder has a good throw.
[*]No cooling effect - if you try putting out a class A fire, it will likely re-ignite once the CO2 has cleared. This type of dry powder melts and provides a good cooling and smothering effect even once the extinguisher is empty.
[*]Stupidly powerful - if you try putting out a fire with loose combustibles (waste paper bin, out of control bonfire, curtains), a CO2 will blast bits of burning material all over the place.
[/LIST]

A major consideration in a household fire is that a lot of people will wait too long before reaching for the extinguisher. The fire then almost certain become predominantly class A, and you'll want a dry powder rather then CO2 extinguisher in this situation.

That said, I think home extinguishers will often result in people putting themselves at risk because they wait too long and have no training. It's hard to say if home extinguishers make much of a difference to fire safety. I certainly wouldn't be without one.

I do agree that a fire blanket is an absolute necessity. And it needs to be screwed to the wall, on an exit route from the kitchen - not in a cupboard. You'll only have seconds to think.



Great post out , out of interest do you keep extinguisher in the bedroom or downstairs near a kitchen thanks
1 Like #20
Always keep it in a central location on an exit route, tending towards the kitchen. A hallway is ideal. The purpose of the extinguisher is to reduce damage to property for small fires that start when you are awake. Most serious household fires during the day will start in the kitchen - these have a habit of rapidly getting out of control and this is what the extinguisher is good at.

A lot of other household fires don't really have the fuel or heat to rapidly grow - waste paper fires are easy to extinguish a glass of water, TV fires normally extinguish when the power is turned off etc.

I don't think there is much reason to keep it near the bedroom. If you are woken by fire - get yourself and other occupants out of the house. Don't even think about trying to extinguish it. If you can't exit due to either smoke or fire, you'd be unconscious by the time your managed to discharge it. Take refuge in a room and call the fire brigade.
#21
cybergibbons
Always keep it in a central location on an exit route, tending towards the kitchen. A hallway is ideal. The purpose of the extinguisher is to reduce damage to property for small fires that start when you are awake. Most serious household fires during the day will start in the kitchen - these have a habit of rapidly getting out of control and this is what the extinguisher is good at.

A lot of other household fires don't really have the fuel or heat to rapidly grow - waste paper fires are easy to extinguish a glass of water, TV fires normally extinguish when the power is turned off etc.

I don't think there is much reason to keep it near the bedroom. If you are woken by fire - get yourself and other occupants out of the house. Don't even think about trying to extinguish it. If you can't exit due to either smoke or fire, you'd be unconscious by the time your managed to discharge it. Take refuge in a room and call the fire brigade.


Thanks rep given
#22
Great price just picked one up. Every home should have a decent fire extinguisher.

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