800W Generator 3 year warranty £59.99 from 6th at Aldi - HotUKDeals
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No electricity, no problem! This petrol powered generator is just the job.

Maximum output: 800W
Engine: 2HP, 2 stroke
Fuel tank capacity: 4 litres
Speed: 3600rpm
Fuel type: 50:1 petrol/oil mix
Forced air cooling
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Top Comments

(2)
15 Likes
Is there an electric version available would be a lot quieter ;)
5 Likes
Excellent deal. I can carry this around with me and charge my iPhone wherever I want. Should make me a lot of friends on the bus.

All Comments

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#1
Great machines for the money. I had one run 14 hours a day for 6 days in a row during power cut last winter. Didn't miss a beat.
1 Like #2
What did you run on it? The output never seems very stable on cheap gennys.
#3
Wheresmylaptop
Great machines for the money. I had one run 14 hours a day for 6 days in a row during power cut last winter. Didn't miss a beat.


How many litres of fuel did you use per day? - Thks
1 Like #4
We ran central heating control panel/pump, a few lights, TV, broadband all at same time. They are all pretty low power. Cant run anything that produces heat - kettle,etc.

I've also used it to power a 500W drill. No problem.

Didn't risk phone/tablet chargers initially due to risk of surges, but after a few days began to get more adventurous and they all survived.

Refuelled once during the day so probably used around half a litre per hour. Maybe a little more.

Negatives - they're not the quietest and can take a good few attempts to get started. Never failed to start though.

Edited By: Wheresmylaptop on Jun 30, 2014 23:02
#5
What about a Mira shower?
#6
montana78
What about a Mira shower?

I think that would come into the Kettle (heat producing) category so no.....don't they use 1500-2000 watts
1 Like #7
Filled up to the max how long could i have my ps4 and tv running off this thing?
15 Likes #8
Is there an electric version available would be a lot quieter ;)
#9
Q. How is this attached to your mains? Or does it run by directly plugging devices into it?

Thanks.
1 Like #10
corred1964
montana78
What about a Mira shower?

I think that would come into the Kettle (heat producing) category so no.....don't they use 1500-2000 watts

NO! :p Some use up to 9800w so perhaps it's a no for a generator ? :D
1 Like #11
niqbal870
Filled up to the max how long could i have my ps4 and tv running off this thing?


All depends on the TV, if you have an older 50inch plasma it will use a lot more than a new more efficient 22 lcd
1 Like #12
Very light emergency use only of course, but good for how cheap it is. If I was after one I would probably have one at least a bit more powerful, 2kw+ ones are quite cheap these days. You can then use it for power tools potentially as well as emergency use. But if you just want a little bit of juice for lights and a TV/PC, this would be ok.

Evo 2.8kw These are supposed to be pretty good if you wanted a bit more power. Three times as powerful (2500w continuous) for twice the price. Not terrible I suppose.
#13
vulcanproject
Very light emergency use only of course, but good for how cheap it is. If I was after one I would probably have one at least a bit more powerful, 2kw+ ones are quite cheap these days. You can then use it for power tools potentially as well as emergency use. But if you just want a little bit of juice for lights and a TV/PC, this would be ok.

Evo 2.8kw These are supposed to be pretty good if you wanted a bit more power. Three times as powerful (2500w continuous) for twice the price. Not terrible I suppose.

^^ this

I have a 2.4kw gen. It'll run the whole house with the exception of the kettle and the oven. Plus no messing with oil/petrol ratios - just fill with unleaded and get it going.
1 Like #14
I would say this is the model that does 650w continuous which is basically just a couple amps and has been cheaper before as well. This is not to say this one is useless or that you must buy a more expensive one.

With a 2.5kw one you'll probably get at least 10 amps for 230v. You could run a small electric heater as well as lights etc if we are talking about winter blackouts here as the primary concern.

But that's only my opinion, I'm not rubbishing this deal

Edited By: vulcanproject on Jul 01, 2014 08:38: .
1 Like #15
The evo 2.8kw for this price does not include the petrol drive unit from what I can see. That is an additional £299.99.
#16
I heard somewhere that the fuel for it is duty free, any one know how does it work?
#17
vulcanproject
Very light emergency use only of course, but good for how cheap it is. If I was after one I would probably have one at least a bit more powerful, 2kw+ ones are quite cheap these days. You can then use it for power tools potentially as well as emergency use. But if you just want a little bit of juice for lights and a TV/PC, this would be ok.

Evo 2.8kw These are supposed to be pretty good if you wanted a bit more power. Three times as powerful (2500w continuous) for twice the price. Not terrible I suppose.
You still need a motor to drive that which is another £300 - so how can that compare.
#18
And the more kw the more fuel it'll consume.

Will these run from cooking oil? Anyone tried?
#19
andy_spoo
And the more kw the more fuel it'll consume.

Will these run from cooking oil? Anyone tried?

no
1 Like #21
andy_spoo
And the more kw the more fuel it'll consume.

Will these run from cooking oil? Anyone tried?

If it's a petrol engine powered generator, then obviously not.
#22
Ok someone who knows more than I do please - exactly how do you make this power your house? Do you just plug your plugs into it somehow or do you have to be quite clever and attach it to something so it powers all the sockets? I've always wanted one but been put off by not knowing quite what you do with it.
#23
Beetlemama
Ok someone who knows more than I do please - exactly how do you make this power your house? Do you just plug your plugs into it somehow or do you have to be quite clever and attach it to something so it powers all the sockets? I've always wanted one but been put off by not knowing quite what you do with it.

You don't (or rather shouldn't if you don't know what you're doing) attach it to the mains, think of it more like you would use a battery that supplies power away from the mains, but runs on fuel instead of electricity. You plug things into it, it doesn't (under normal uses) run power into the mains of your house.


Edited By: davej1710 on Jul 01, 2014 10:44
#24
Beetlemama
Ok someone who knows more than I do please - exactly how do you make this power your house? Do you just plug your plugs into it somehow or do you have to be quite clever and attach it to something so it powers all the sockets? I've always wanted one but been put off by not knowing quite what you do with it.

Or if you have some knowledge and skills. Attach alarm to supply feed (to know when power is back to normal). Then turn off power supply (main switch). Make male to male extension on both ends(keep in mind right wiring). Connect one side to generator output other into any house socket. Wolia house has power back on :D Disconnect all when alarm rings and switch on mains back:) Obviously there are different ways of doing this, as in how to connect, where to connect....
oO Only trouble that there are different generators and some might kill half of your home equipment :D
So you would need some kinda controller to have steady ~220V, otherwise anything not in a range 220V- 230V (50-60Hz) might fry your equipment :{
#25
So its a petrol powered battery that I plug my things into lol bar plug time then? Ok, maybe. But it won't run the lights and that. I was interested because people were asking about it running showers but I've only ever had hard wired showers, nothing that plugged in. Thanks you two
1 Like #26
I did a bit of research into this as our house was suffering from power cuts a good few times a year. Luckily the supply has been upgraded now. In any case I WOULD NOT recommend using this with anything that uses microprocessors. Boilers, fridges, TV's etc. If its got a chip, forget it. You need a sinewave generator that basically delivers a clean power supply with no spikes or drops. One splutter on this little 2T unit and it could blow your PCB on your boiler or TV. You wont look so clever then!

BTW if you plug this into your house directly without knowing what you are doing, you could kill the guy that is working on restoring the power. for it to work you need to isolate the house from the grid.
3 Likes #27
I want one of these. I have no idea why I want one, but I do.

So will try to resist until I can come up with a good reason
banned#28
Ordered, ready for the zombie apocalypse.
5 Likes #29
Excellent deal. I can carry this around with me and charge my iPhone wherever I want. Should make me a lot of friends on the bus.
#30
FredsVan
I want one of these. I have no idea why I want one, but I do.So will try to resist until I can come up with a good reason
Same here but I do have a couple of reasons if people could tell me if it would work.

These 2 reasons are why I would like one.

Hoover will it power that
Bouncy castle will it power that.

Edited By: paulsssss on Jul 01, 2014 13:51
#31
FredsVan
I want one of these. I have no idea why I want one, but I do.So will try to resist until I can come up with a good reason
Power up your shed?
#32
Bare in mind that in a couple of weeks if your store has any left they will probably be reduced to £39.99 if you want to take the risk.
#33
jon0881
I did a bit of research into this as our house was suffering from power cuts a good few times a year. Luckily the supply has been upgraded now. In any case I WOULD NOT recommend using this with anything that uses microprocessors. Boilers, fridges, TV's etc. If its got a chip, forget it. You need a sinewave generator that basically delivers a clean power supply with no spikes or drops. One splutter on this little 2T unit and it could blow your PCB on your boiler or TV. You wont look so clever then!

BTW if you plug this into your house directly without knowing what you are doing, you could kill the guy that is working on restoring the power. for it to work you need to isolate the house from the grid.

Total rubbish. The electricity providers have so many safeguards in place to stop current flow on an area being worked on, the chance of winning the lottery is better than them even getting any sort of shock.

As for blowing household equipment, again a surge from a small generator like this won't provide enough current to blow your nose, let alone a boiler board.

Like pgregg, I've had to use a 2.3Kva many times due to power outages in the countryside. We run the house central heating pump, the freezer and 2 fridges, the lights, computer, TV and satellite receiver all at the same time. Even boil water in a kettle, or use the microwave. Admittedly, running something like a computer works best if you have an uninterruptable power supply (UPS) to smooth the dips, but none of the other appliances have ever suffered breakage.

One thing I'd also add to pgreggs list, connect the lead from the generator to the house ring main using an rcd breaker between generator and main. That way, any back flow at all will trip the rcd and separate the generator supply from the house supply

Edited By: gazjon on Jul 01, 2014 15:21
banned#34
Do these make a lot of noise. I was thinking of taking one fishing but didn't know if the noise would be too loud in the background to watch tv.
1 Like #35
Supersid
Do these make a lot of noise. I was thinking of taking one fishing but didn't know if the noise would be too loud in the background to watch tv.

Yeah, you really don't want to take this fishing. All the other anglers are likely to throw you in the river. They make a god-awful racket.
Get yourself a 7 or 10 inch tablet, wifi/mifi with 3 unlimited data plan and netflix for fishing TV.

Edited By: pgregg on Jul 01, 2014 15:34
#36
I have one of these from last time it was on, its excellent but it does struggle at top wattages. i would suggest nothing higher than 700, i use a 500w drill without any problem, but my 750 jigsaw would not run.
fuel not duty free, it takes petrol with a 2 stoke oil mix.
1 Like #37
gazjon
jon0881
I did a bit of research into this as our house was suffering from power cuts a good few times a year. Luckily the supply has been upgraded now. In any case I WOULD NOT recommend using this with anything that uses microprocessors. Boilers, fridges, TV's etc. If its got a chip, forget it. You need a sinewave generator that basically delivers a clean power supply with no spikes or drops. One splutter on this little 2T unit and it could blow your PCB on your boiler or TV. You wont look so clever then!

BTW if you plug this into your house directly without knowing what you are doing, you could kill the guy that is working on restoring the power. for it to work you need to isolate the house from the grid.

Total rubbish. The electricity providers have so many safeguards in place to stop current flow on an area being worked on, the chance of winning the lottery is better than them even getting any sort of shock.

As for blowing household equipment, again a surge from a small generator like this won't provide enough current to blow your nose, let alone a boiler board.

Like pgregg, I've had to use a 2.3Kva many times due to power outages in the countryside. We run the house central heating pump, the freezer and 2 fridges, the lights, computer, TV and satellite receiver all at the same time. Even boil water in a kettle, or use the microwave. Admittedly, running something like a computer works best if you have an uninterruptable power supply (UPS) to smooth the dips, but none of the other appliances have ever suffered breakage.

One thing I'd also add to pgreggs list, connect the lead from the generator to the house ring main using an rcd breaker between generator and main. That way, any back flow at all will trip the rcd and separate the generator supply from the house supply

How is it total rubbish? Surely it depends on what and where the engineer is working on. If you look at a solar panel installation they have a control module to isolate the upload to the grid if the mains it cut. If someone is going to power expensive electrical kit from this look at the differences between these generators and sinewave. You get what you pay for.

http://www.justgenerators.co.uk/pages/Safety.htm


Edited By: jon0881 on Jul 01, 2014 16:24
#38
FredsVan
I want one of these. I have no idea why I want one, but I do.

So will try to resist until I can come up with a good reason

Did you generate any reasons?
#39
montana78
What about a Mira shower?
they are rated 2-4kw. So no.
#40
gazjon
andy_spoo
And the more kw the more fuel it'll consume.

Will these run from cooking oil? Anyone tried?

If it's a petrol engine powered generator, then obviously not.

Woops. Assumed it was diesel (old school!).

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