9W LED Bulbs (>60W equiv.) 5 pack now £7.99 at Screwfix - HotUKDeals
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9W LED Bulbs (>60W equiv.) 5 pack now £7.99 at Screwfix

£7.99 @ Screwfix
Great reviews on these 60W equivalent bulbs which produce a very good quality light (subjectively much brighter than a 60W filament). On offer at £7.99 for 5 bulbs (£2 off). This is for the 9W warm…
qyestionmark Avatar
4m, 3w agoFound 4 months, 3 weeks ago
Great reviews on these 60W equivalent bulbs which produce a very good quality light (subjectively much brighter than a 60W filament). On offer at £7.99 for 5 bulbs (£2 off).

This is for the 9W warm white on a BC fitting. Also available in cool white and/or on ES fittings at the same offer price. Specified as 806 lumen with a colour temperature of 2700K, however they seem to have a slightly better quality light than a tungsten bulb and I'd wager most people would say they're noticeably brighter than 60W but still a pleasant warm white tungsten-like colour. Specified for 15,000 hours and with a 3 year warranty.
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qyestionmark Avatar
4m, 3w agoFound 4 months, 3 weeks ago
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(4)
20 Likes
There seems to be quite a lot of confusion here about efficiency/ratings. A little research shows that light bulbs are currently rated under EU Commission Delegated Regulation No 874/2012 (12 July 2012) (!), with ratings given for the power used by a bulb to provide a comparable light output relative to a standard incandescent bulb.

The bulb is A rated if it uses <24% of the power,
A+ rated if it uses <17% of the power,
and A++ rated if it uses <11% of the power.
There is currently no category above A++.

These Screwfix bulbs produce a luminous flux which is at least as good as a 60W bulb, and consume 9W. 9 is 15% of 60, so the bulbs are rated A+. Simples. (And they are hardly borderline in being rated that).

If, as many of us subjectively speculate, these bulbs are actually equivalent to 75W, then their relative consumption is actually 12%, which would make them borderline A++.

CFL lights (coiled tube) typically use around 1/5th the power (20%) so are A rated. Good LEDs use around 1/10th the power (10%) so can be A++ rated. Note that this is very close to the A+/A++ threshold and there may be practical reasons why a particular LED bulb falls into the A+ category without being poor. A particular problem is that LED is a point light source which is quite directional. That may be great in a spotlight but other applications may need a softer/more uniform output. At the point you start diffusing the light you lose a little efficiency and a LED bulb will likely become A+ rather than A++.

These Screwfix bulbs have a diffuser - i.e. the coating on the globe which spreads the light out so that the bulb looks very much like a regular bulb (and so you don't get the highly directional point sources that a LED produces). That hits the overall efficiency slightly and makes these A+ rated.

Edited By: qyestionmark on Oct 06, 2016 09:42: info added
9 Likes
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least
A reasonably good 60W tungsten filament bulb apparently gives about 750 lumens. As I said in the deal description these are specified as 804 lumens, so on paper probably a little better than a 60W bulb. But as I also said, I suspect the colour temperature is probably also a tad hotter than an incandescent and I'd wager that subjectively most people would find them noticeably brighter than 60W. Wet finger in the air I'd say these are about 75W equivalent, but others might judge them differently. Almost all the BRANDED LED bulbs (with diffusers) that I've looked at need around 9W to generate 800 lumens so I don't think these are any less efficient. I'll wager there are a number of unbranded LED bulbs which claim a similar output from less power but I wonder if those would actually stand up to scrutiny?

EDIT: The one thing I'd add to the above is that there is an angular component to the measurement of luminous flux. These LED bulbs have a stated beam angle of 200 degrees, so the light they produce is far more concentrated in the hemisphere above the plane of the bulb than below (with the bulb upright like in the picture). An incandescent bulb with a similar lumen rating but with a beam angle approaching 360 degrees will have less light in the same hemisphere. The result is that these LED bulbs may *seem* brighter than a similarly specified incandescent depending on their orientation. That said, I am using these bulbs both upright in lamp stands and hanging in pendants and haven't yet found a situation where they seem poorer than a 60W incandescent, but that may not be true for all applications.

Edited By: qyestionmark on Oct 06, 2016 09:21: .
5 Likes
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

Don't know about brighter but I can confirm that you are wrong.

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1 Like #2
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
2 Likes #3
I have the warm and the cool, the cool are very clinical.
#4
I love the cool ones. Bargain at this price, I need more. Very handy!
#5
calvin22580
Thanks. Ordered


#6
very good price.
1 Like #7
These are good bulbs, had five in my flat for a while now, no issues.
1 Like #8
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

Edited By: bobo53 on Oct 04, 2016 14:28
#9
Good find
5 Likes #10
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

Don't know about brighter but I can confirm that you are wrong.
#11
stoopid_name
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least
Don't know about brighter but I can confirm that you are wrong.
how can you say I am wrong if you do not know how bright they are!! Anyway, just spotted now, the OP is saying that the box does say 806Lumens, then looks like this must in reality be an equivalent of a 90-100 watts and not 60w as specified in the advert


Edited By: bobo53 on Oct 04, 2016 14:46
3 Likes #12
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
To be fair all the dimmable ones I have tried make a horrendous buzzing sound. I bought the candle SES ones last week and ended up changing the dimmer for a standard switch instead. Same was true of the GU10 type too
#13
bobo53
stoopid_name
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least
Don't know about brighter but I can confirm that you are wrong.
how can you say I am wrong if you do not know how bright they are!! Anyway, just spotted now, the OP is saying that the box does say 806Lumens, then looks like this must in reality be an equivalent of a 90-100 watts and not 60w as specified in the advert



​i thought they were brighter, but didn't give it much thought.
2 Likes #14
bobbler
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
To be fair all the dimmable ones I have tried make a horrendous buzzing sound. I bought the candle SES ones last week and ended up changing the dimmer for a standard switch instead. Same was true of the GU10 type too
That's unlikely to be the lamps, the problem will have been the dimmer. LEDs are notorious for only being compatible with some dimmers. Unfortunately you can't simply change to LED and have 100% success with your existing dimming system.
2 Likes #15
800 lumins is correct for a standard 60W tungsten bulb. The greater the colour temperature the slightly higher the light output.
1 Like #16
bobo53
looks like this must in reality be an equivalent of a 90-100 watts and not 60w as specified in the advert

I have a (almost) house full of them and they are definitely not this bright. The other bulbs I have are Philips Warmglow 60w equiv which are 806Lm and seem about the same as these.

Both draw 9w which for the given light is reasonably efficient.
#17
I suspect the brighter comments come from those switching from fluorescents which loose their initial brightness fairly quickly.
1 Like #18
Bought these in the past when they were at the same price. Seriously bright. I'd say comparable to the traditional 100w bulbs moreso than the 60w in terms of brightness.
9 Likes #19
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least
A reasonably good 60W tungsten filament bulb apparently gives about 750 lumens. As I said in the deal description these are specified as 804 lumens, so on paper probably a little better than a 60W bulb. But as I also said, I suspect the colour temperature is probably also a tad hotter than an incandescent and I'd wager that subjectively most people would find them noticeably brighter than 60W. Wet finger in the air I'd say these are about 75W equivalent, but others might judge them differently. Almost all the BRANDED LED bulbs (with diffusers) that I've looked at need around 9W to generate 800 lumens so I don't think these are any less efficient. I'll wager there are a number of unbranded LED bulbs which claim a similar output from less power but I wonder if those would actually stand up to scrutiny?

EDIT: The one thing I'd add to the above is that there is an angular component to the measurement of luminous flux. These LED bulbs have a stated beam angle of 200 degrees, so the light they produce is far more concentrated in the hemisphere above the plane of the bulb than below (with the bulb upright like in the picture). An incandescent bulb with a similar lumen rating but with a beam angle approaching 360 degrees will have less light in the same hemisphere. The result is that these LED bulbs may *seem* brighter than a similarly specified incandescent depending on their orientation. That said, I am using these bulbs both upright in lamp stands and hanging in pendants and haven't yet found a situation where they seem poorer than a 60W incandescent, but that may not be true for all applications.

Edited By: qyestionmark on Oct 06, 2016 09:21: .
1 Like #20
Well said.

The only thing I'd say against these bulbs is that they're slightly longer than a filament bulb and may not suit some shades. ie. protrude out the bottom or top.
2 Likes #21
qyestionmark
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least
A reasonably good 60W tungsten filament bulb apparently gives about 750 lumens. As I said in the deal description these are specified as 804 lumens, so on paper probably a little better than a 60W bulb. But as I also said, I suspect the colour temperature is probably also a tad hotter than an incandescent and I'd wager that subjectively most people would find them noticeably brighter than 60W. Wet finger in the air I'd say these are about 75W equivalent, but others might judge them differently. Almost all the BRANDED LED bulbs I've looked at need around 9W to generate 800 lumens so I don't think these are any less efficient. I'll wager there are a number of LED bulbs which claim a similar output from less power but I wonder if those would actually stand up to scrutiny?
EDIT: The one thing I'd add to the above is that there is an angular component to the measurement of luminous flux. These LED bulbs have a stated beam angle of 200 degrees, so the luminous flux is far more concentrated in the hemisphere above the plane of the bulb than below (with the fitting downwards like in the picture). An incandescent bulb with a similar lumen rating but a beam angle approaching 360 degrees will have less light in the same hemisphere. The result is that these LED bulbs may seem brighter than a similarly specified incandescent in one hemisphere.
FWIW I am using these bulbs both upright in lamp stands and hanging in pendants and haven't noticed any orientation where they are poorer than a 60W incandescent.
sorted out, I went for it. Can see that it is about the same as a 100w filament (maybe better) and the same more or less as a 20w (100w) older neon lamp, unused and branded. So, very efficient and that is what the A+ stands for. Cannot be a 60watts at all, not sure how they quote these figures. I got some 5w led bought at poundland and definitely they nearly beat the 60 watts filament. As a rule, an A+ rated led bulb should give at least 10 times more than his rated wattage and when compared with an older tungsten one and this one does for sure. Even if I am slightly wrong because of the way we see light, this is for sure an equivalent of a 90watts at least

Edited By: bobo53 on Oct 04, 2016 17:06
1 Like #22
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

I've got a mixture of the cool white and warm versions all over the house - no issues at all and most have been installed for over a year now and my electricity usage is stupidly low!

They are more like a 75W Equivelant IMO as noticably brighter than a 60W that I tested. Regarding efficiency, yes these are under 100 Lumens per Watt but very few LED lamps out there currently are and these are under £2 each!
#23
ipswich78
bobbler
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
To be fair all the dimmable ones I have tried make a horrendous buzzing sound. I bought the candle SES ones last week and ended up changing the dimmer for a standard switch instead. Same was true of the GU10 type too
That's unlikely to be the lamps, the problem will have been the dimmer. LEDs are notorious for only being compatible with some dimmers. Unfortunately you can't simply change to LED and have 100% success with your existing dimming system.
Useful to know thanks. Will give a new dimmer a try next time. The kitchen GU10 cost me a packet to replace the dimmers as we have an MK grid system in there with six lighting zones all of which had dimmers
#24
I've been looking around for "cool white" lights and my question is why are they so hard to find?
1 Like #25
iz123456789
I've been looking around for "cool white" lights and my question is why are they so hard to find?

I think people find a warm white more relaxing, so that's what sells most. Cool white is usually what people buy for task lighting and probably used much less in the home. Screwfix have a cool white at the same price as the warm white (click this link). Note though that some of the earlier comments say these are quite harsh, but if that's what you are after they seem like great value.



Edited By: qyestionmark on Oct 04, 2016 18:38: .
1 Like #26
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
Here's a
bobbler
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
To be fair all the dimmable ones I have tried make a horrendous buzzing sound. I bought the candle SES ones last week and ended up changing the dimmer for a standard switch instead. Same was true of the GU10 type too

Good explanation of the problem with dimming LED lights from bigclive
https://youtu.be/fWh2obSY0dQ
#27
qyestionmark
iz123456789
I've been looking around for "cool white" lights and my question is why are they so hard to find?
I think people find a warm white more relaxing, so that's what sells most. Cool white is usually what people buy for task lighting and probably used much less in the home. Screwfix have a cool white at the same price as the warm white (click this link). Note though that some of the earlier comments say these are quite harsh, but if that's what you are after they seem like great value.

Regarding Warm Vs Cool, I've got a mixture of both - Living room, entrance hall, landing and outside lights are warm and I keep these areas more dimly lit whereas Bedrooms, Kitchen, Utility, Garage and Bathrooms are all cool white and although they are lovely and bright - It's not that harsh though when you have a coloured shade to diffuse the light and the bedrooms look fairly natural with these whereas the kitchen and bathrooms are more white light but not blue like some very cool lamps you can get - 4000K+
2 Likes #28
Cool white is good for bathrooms, kitchens and studies. Warm for lounge and bedrooms :)
#29
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

I agree with you.

If it is A+, 9w should get more than 60w.

It is likely that A+ is a overstatement.
#30
bobbler
GRiDlock
Very good price.. only downside is non-dimmable
To be fair all the dimmable ones I have tried make a horrendous buzzing sound. I bought the candle SES ones last week and ended up changing the dimmer for a standard switch instead. Same was true of the GU10 type too

Due to problems with dimmer switches, I changed my whole house from dimmer switch to non-dimmable.

Much easier and longer lasting for both switch and bulbs, and cost less each time replace them.

I do not really need lights being dimmable.


Edited By: huangxq2 on Oct 07, 2016 14:43: typo
#31
huangxq2
If it is A+, 9w should get more than 60w.
It is likely that A+ is a overstatement.
Or 60W is an understatement, which is perhaps more likely given all the comments from users of these bulbs.

But why speculate when the light output has actually been measured (at 806 lumens)? I'd genuinely be interested to read the spec for a branded bulb with a significantly better efficiency i.e. more lumens for similar/less electrical power. Do you have some in mind? Thx.
1 Like #32
For people going on about efficiency, have a look at LED Filament bulbs such as this and this. Both A++ rated one 6w and one 7w and both 60w tungsten equivalent.
1 Like #33
I bought the cool white ones last time when they were 5 for £10.
Installed in living room and started giving me a headache so put normal back on.
Kitchen and hall way have cool white on, instant on and very bright, like a 90W bulb equivalent.
At this price I will buy some warm white for living room, as its coming to winter so will use more light anyway.
#34
to be fair it has got the greater then symbol so its a little over 60 watts
#35
bobo53
9w but only 60w equivalent, not efficient at all. Can someone confirm if in reality they are brighter?? it is rated at A+, it should give the equivalent of a 90w at least

I bought 10 warm white ones last year. They are very bright. 60w normal bulb used to be very weak and I bought only one in my life and never used it again because of low brightness.
These are like 90-100w normal ones (just little weaker or equal to normal 100w bulb used to be before eu banned it). One is strong enough for large living room.
#36
calvin22580
calvin22580
Thanks. Ordered




Just to correct its Kelvin
20 Likes #37
There seems to be quite a lot of confusion here about efficiency/ratings. A little research shows that light bulbs are currently rated under EU Commission Delegated Regulation No 874/2012 (12 July 2012) (!), with ratings given for the power used by a bulb to provide a comparable light output relative to a standard incandescent bulb.

The bulb is A rated if it uses <24% of the power,
A+ rated if it uses <17% of the power,
and A++ rated if it uses <11% of the power.
There is currently no category above A++.

These Screwfix bulbs produce a luminous flux which is at least as good as a 60W bulb, and consume 9W. 9 is 15% of 60, so the bulbs are rated A+. Simples. (And they are hardly borderline in being rated that).

If, as many of us subjectively speculate, these bulbs are actually equivalent to 75W, then their relative consumption is actually 12%, which would make them borderline A++.

CFL lights (coiled tube) typically use around 1/5th the power (20%) so are A rated. Good LEDs use around 1/10th the power (10%) so can be A++ rated. Note that this is very close to the A+/A++ threshold and there may be practical reasons why a particular LED bulb falls into the A+ category without being poor. A particular problem is that LED is a point light source which is quite directional. That may be great in a spotlight but other applications may need a softer/more uniform output. At the point you start diffusing the light you lose a little efficiency and a LED bulb will likely become A+ rather than A++.

These Screwfix bulbs have a diffuser - i.e. the coating on the globe which spreads the light out so that the bulb looks very much like a regular bulb (and so you don't get the highly directional point sources that a LED produces). That hits the overall efficiency slightly and makes these A+ rated.

Edited By: qyestionmark on Oct 06, 2016 09:42: info added
#38
NIckJH
For people going on about efficiency, have a look at LED Filament bulbs such as this and this. Both A++ rated one 6w and one 7w and both 60w tungsten equivalent.
Thanks for that. Ironically, if the 7W one is equivalent to a 60W bulb then it should be A+ rated not A++ (as it's only 11.7%)! :)

Neither of those bulbs has a diffuser. Do you know of any A++ rated with a diffuser?
#39
thanks ordered great price
#40
qyestionmark
There seems to be quite a lot of confusion here about efficiency/ratings. A little research shows that light bulbs are currently rated under EU Commission Delegated Regulation No 874/2012 (12 July 2012) (!), with ratings given for the power used by a bulb to provide a comparable light output relative to a standard incandescent bulb.
The bulb is A rated if it uses <24% of the power,
A+ rated if it uses <17% of the power,
and A++ rated if it uses <11% of the power.
There is no currently no category above A++.
These Screwfix bulbs produce a luminous flux which is at least as good as a 60W bulb, and consume 9W. 9 is 15% of 60, so the bulbs are rated A+. Simples. (And they are hardly borderline in being rated that).
If, as many of us subjectively speculate, these bulbs are actually equivalent to 75W, then their relative consumption is actually 12%, which would make them borderline A++.
Note also that these bulbs have a diffuser - i.e. the coating on the globe which spreads the light out so that the bulb looks more like a regular bulb (and so you don't get the highly directional point sources that a LED produces). That hits the overall efficiency slightly.
could you please explain why this bulb is same as a 100w?? that is what I see

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