Air Conditioner £124.99 9000 BTU w remote @ ebuyer - HotUKDeals
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Air Conditioner £124.99 9000 BTU w remote @ ebuyer

deanos Avatar
8y, 6m agoFound 8 years, 6 months ago
Features:

3 operating modes: cool, dehumidify and fan
No professional maitance required
Low runing cost - Only 8p approx. per hour

9000BTU cooling capacity.
Cools room size up to 250 Sq.Ft
Environmental-friendly refrigerant R407c.
3-speed control accessible using panel or remote control.
Energy efficient.
Horizontal swing louvers for enhancing cooling performance.
24 hours programmable timer.
Self-diagnosis capability and water tank full alarm.
Rolling casters for ease of movement.
Extendable exhaust hose (30cm - 140cm)
Width 40cm, Height 76cm, Depth 37cm
2500W
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deanos Avatar
8y, 6m agoFound 8 years, 6 months ago
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#1
http://image.ebuyer.com/UK/R0124266-04.jpg
#2
I have one of these, they are great at keeping an average room cool....
#3
tempting as my over-weight lardy **** always gets too hot in summer. We ain't quite there yet but its heating up that way.

This is a good price tho which makes it hot even tho it keeps ya cool
#4
thecardiffone;2061482
I have one of these, they are great at keeping an average room cool....


Can you please tell me how the condense (water tank) is emptied away.
#5
Just a guess but is there a hose that needs to be placed out a nearby window?

Dave
#6
The customer reviews for this unit should answer your questions.
#7
whiteswan;2062155
Just a guess but is there a hose that needs to be placed out a nearby window?

Dave


Hi Dave.
Just to clarify what I'm asking - It's not the exhaust heat that I'm talking about (which will discharge via a large hose) but the water that's produced by the refrigeration unit. This falls into an inbuilt tank and has to be emptied when full.

The way this is done on my present unit is by removing the tank and emptying it. On some units I've seen the tank cannot be removed and you have to empty it via an inbuilt hose which have been close to the floor. As some of these tanks can hold a lot of liquid, having an emptying hose at virtual floor level can be risky!!
#8
Bad Actor;2062172
The customer reviews for this unit should answer your questions.


One of the reviewers has answered my question.

Thank you for pointing me in that direction
#9
bargaindeals
Hi Dave.
Just to clarify what I'm asking - It's not the exhaust heat that I'm talking about (which will discharge via a large hose) but the water that's produced by the refrigeration unit. This falls into an inbuilt tank and has to be emptied when full.

The way this is done on my present unit is by removing the tank and emptying it. On some units I've seen the tank cannot be removed and you have to empty it via an inbuilt hose which have been close to the floor. As some of these tanks can hold a lot of liquid, having an emptying hose at virtual floor level can be risky!!


I find my tank which is drained by a small hose at floor level only needs draining a couple of times an one season.
#10
just to add my 2 pennys worth - at 2500w i think this thing will probably cost 0.7p-0.8p a minute to run.

so you could see your leccy bill go up by 25/35 quid a month with regular use.

i'm just saying this as someone who recently got stung by overusing an electric convection heater over xmas.

however! if we get a consistent month of heat like this i'll eat my hat :-)
#11
bargaindeals
Can you please tell me how the condense (water tank) is emptied away.


This doesn't have a water tank.

This is a proper air con unit, just pop the exhaust hose out a window or door, all of the hot air is then exhausted out and cold air is generated by the unit into the room.

They are generally very good and will cool an average size room.

Although watch your electricity bill !
#12
It does look like a nice piece of kit but I don't know where they get the figure of 8p an hour from. 2500w is a lot of power - my kettle uses 3k and you should see that meter spin when I switch it on. Nevertheless I'm tempted - there's nothing like a cool bedroom on a hot sticky night...
#13
Jim N
This doesn't have a water tank.

This is a proper air con unit, just pop the exhaust hose out a window or door, all of the hot air is then exhausted out and cold air is generated by the unit into the room.

They are generally very good and will cool an average size room.

Although watch your electricity bill !


Proper air con has a condense water outlet, those installed in buildings pipe it away, air con in cars drips it out under the car. (look under your car after the air con has been used for half an hour or more).
#14
Jim N
This doesn't have a water tank.

This is a proper air con unit, just pop the exhaust hose out a window or door, all of the hot air is then exhausted out and cold air is generated by the unit into the room.

They are generally very good and will cool an average size room.

Although watch your electricity bill !


ermmm do you have this unit?? If it doesn't have a water tank I dunno why it would need this feature....

Self-diagnosis capability and water tank full alarm.

To be fair tho a good ebuyer review says they havent needed to empty theirs in 2 years and that the majority of moisture drains out the exhaust hose. :)
#15
Noghar
It does look like a nice piece of kit but I don't know where they get the figure of 8p an hour from. 2500w is a lot of power - my kettle uses 3k and you should see that meter spin when I switch it on. Nevertheless I'm tempted - there's nothing like a cool bedroom on a hot sticky night...


Well, 2.5kW running for an hour gives you 2.5kWh so just multiply that by what is on your bill as your tariff. If it is 10p/kWh then the cost is 25p per hour to run, assuming it is running flat out of course. If it only runs 50% of the time then that of course reduces the cost. 8p may be a bit low, probably more like 13 or 14p per hour.

You could always fit it with a savaplug to reduce energy consumption further.
http://www.shopeco.co.uk/savaplug-364-p.asp
#16
Wicked Lester
Well, 2.5kW running for an hour gives you 2.5kWh so just multiply that by what is on your bill as your tariff. If it is 10p/kWh then the cost is 25p per hour to run, assuming it is running flat out of course. If it only runs 50% of the time then that of course reduces the cost. 8p may be a bit low, probably more like 13 or 14p per hour.

You could always fit it with a savaplug to reduce energy consumption further.
http://www.shopeco.co.uk/savaplug-364-p.asp


You're right of course. I think eBuyer is being a bit cavalier with the figures. (a) they have no idea what tariff the user might be on and (b) they might be referring to the power used when the fan is running but not the air-con bit which of course would make a big difference.

And that Shopeco site you recommend is great, thanks - a shame the savaplug has been withdrawn pending a new generation..
#17
Noghar
You're right of course. I think eBuyer is being a bit cavalier with the figures. (a) they have no idea what tariff the user might be on and (b) they might be referring to the power used when the fan is running but not the air-con bit which of course would make a big difference.

And that Shopeco site you recommend is great, thanks - a shame the savaplug has been withdrawn pending a new generation..


Ah, didn't notice they'd discontinued that model. I think the new version is to improve compatibility with more fridges/freezers etc. Certainly, for large fridge freezers e.g.american style fridges and 240v standalone aircon units these devices start to make sense financially, plus the environmental benefits of course.

These do benefit older units more however as modern 'A' rated appliances are better at regulating their power requirement.
#18
Wicked Lester;2062529
You could always fit it with a savaplug to reduce energy consumption further.
I doubt that will make a measurable difference.

You have to remember with these portable air conditioners that the hot air they dump out of the window has to come from somewhere - so they are constantly pulling hot air into the room which they then have to cool. Not exactly very efficient.
#19
of course heat will get back into the room anyway, but the part that bugs me is that people have to open a window or door to let the hose out! what's the diameter of the hose, can't you drill a hole or make a little hose-flap? :)
#20
As has been mentioned above, hot air goes out a large pipe (out a window) and condensed water from the air is collected in a tank which either has to be emptied directly or via a hose. Someone mentioned they only have to empty theirs twice a season. On the other hand, I have to empty about 2 gallons of water every 4 hours on hottest days so I guess it depends on the specific unit. Any half-decent unit has an alarm and an auto-stop when the tank is full so leaks shouldn't be an issue.
#21
[QUOTE=pibpob]I doubt that will make a measurable difference.

Well, depending on how it regulates power draw down after the initial startup it could be as high as 20%, which could equate to as much as 30p saving per day (based on 6 hours use)! :w00t:

OK, not a lot but could pay for the savaplug in 10 weeks or so. So, definately measurable, but not a lot financially, although you'd save on the release of 100kG of CO2 - every little helps as a famous supermarket megopolis says!
#22
Smiff;2063101
of course heat will get back into the room anyway,
I may have misread you, but just in case you haven't appreciated the issue - these units actively suck air into the room.
#23
deepmenace
just to add my 2 pennys worth - at 2500w i think this thing will probably cost 0.7p-0.8p a minute to run.

so you could see your leccy bill go up by 25/35 quid a month with regular use.

i'm just saying this as someone who recently got stung by overusing an electric convection heater over xmas.

however! if we get a consistent month of heat like this i'll eat my hat :-)


someone on the radio said we are getting a hot summer this year just like last year obviously
#24
Wicked Lester;2062529
Well, 2.5kW running for an hour gives you 2.5kWh so just multiply that by what is on your bill as your tariff. If it is 10p/kWh then the cost is 25p per hour to run, assuming it is running flat out of course. If it only runs 50% of the time then that of course reduces the cost. 8p may be a bit low, probably more like 13 or 14p per hour.

You could always fit it with a savaplug to reduce energy consumption further.
http://www.shopeco.co.uk/savaplug-364-p.asp


i find your avatar disturbing:x
#25
Wicked Lester;2063278
Well, depending on how it regulates power draw down after the initial startup [the saving with a Savaplug] could be as high as 20%
I find these figures incredibly hard to believe. I really don't think you'll ever get more than a minuscule saving. I'd be very interested to see some independent tests of the device; otherwise I can only conclude it's snake oil.
#26
pibpob

You have to remember with these portable air conditioners that the hot air they dump out of the window has to come from somewhere - so they are constantly pulling hot air into the room which they then have to cool. Not exactly very efficient.


You have to use this in a closed off room ideally, so that cooled air stays in the room and warm air infiltration from other parts of the house is minimised.
#27
I've bought one, I can't bear another sweaty hot summer like that of a couple of years ago.

I can use it regularly in my office where I have 2 computers running most of the time.
#28
I will just say this isnt a proper air con unit. the main thing is you got to open a window to exhaust the hot air, open you open the window up you lose your closed circuit. just like your car-as you have to have all your windows closed for your air con to work correctly. Other things are, the heat the unit will create its self in the room, thats why real air con units are set away from buildings to they are take in cool air flow and realise the hot air from the circuit and the unit. Then how much electric you will use- 2.5kw is alot that will be as much as you can really use as 3kw/13amps is about the max. You would be better buying a big fan with your money. There is a reason its a £124 and real air con units cost thousands.
#29
Wicked Lester;2063359
You have to use this in a closed off room ideally, so that cooled air stays in the room and warm air infiltration from other parts of the house is minimised.
I think you're misunderstanding the principle too - the device can only operate by taking air from the the room, heating it up, and dumping it out of the window. If you seal the room, then it will puff and pant and fail to suck any air into the room - and then it will not work any more.

Proper "split unit" air conditioners take their cooling air from outside. This one operates on the same principle, but takes its cooling air from inside, thus leaving no alternative but to suck more air into the room.
#30
We have "proper" £5k+ industrial aircon units at work and they ALL have condensation pipes fitted to get rid of the water so to say that this does not need one as it is a "proper" unit doesnt seem to make sense?!?!?!?!
#31
frakison;2063447
We have "proper" £5k+ industrial aircon units at work and they ALL have condensation pipes fitted to get rid of the water so to say that this does not need one
Because it has a tank instead. The only difference is that you need to empty the tank periodically, rather than "fit and forget" for the split units.
#32
Oh, by the way, you can't use a Savaplug on such an appliance anyway - anything more than a mechanical thermostat (such as the display/timer on this) is completely ******ed up by what it does to the supply.
#33
pibpob
I find these figures incredibly hard to believe. I really don't think you'll ever get more than a minuscule saving. I'd be very interested to see some independent tests of the device; otherwise I can only conclude it's snake oil.


Nope, it's Physics. Motors (in this case a compressor) need a high current draw to get started but don't need the same to keep running.

If you were to look at a workshop compressor, any modern one will have an "unloader valve" (You can hear this hiss whenever the compressor motor cuts out). The function of the unloader is to empty the compressor cylinder of compressed air, so that next time it starts up it's pumping into a low pressure, rather than trying to start against an already full cylinder. As it is, workshop compressors pull a huge current at startup and running one without an unloader would pop the fuse on a domestic supply. Fridges/portable air con units (of any sort) don't have such valves. There's a natural reluctance to add any such potential leaky valve to a sealed regrigerant system. So when a fridge compressor starts, it's pumping into a high load. Such a compressor motor must thus be rated for its starting power, which is over-rating it for the running power.

The Savaplug reduces motor power electrically, after a small delay from first starting.
#34
seanjames
i find your avatar disturbing:x


That's because you haven't seen the movie 'Office Space'. :)
#35
pibpob
Oh, by the way, you can't use a Savaplug on such an appliance anyway - anything more than a mechanical thermostat (such as the display/timer on this) is completely ******ed up by what it does to the supply.


Are you sure? Things like displays and timers will have quite high tolerances. Remember that most appliances are designed for European markets which can be 220V to 260V IIRC. Obviously by having varying voltages the power is affected, not unlike what a Savaplug would do.

Happy to stand corrected of course. :)
#36
It doesn't vary the voltage though - it chops bits out of the waveform, like a light dimmer. This can cause all sorts of havoc for devices not designed for it - like using dimmers with low energy light bulbs. You'll see warnings about it here, where it also neatly sums up the thing thus: "You'll know you're saving electricity when the red light glows."

Need I say more? :whistling:
#37
You can only use a Savaplug on nothing with more intelligence than a mechanical thermostat. And even then, you show me savings of 20% and I'll show you me eating my hat!
#38
pibpob
You can only use a Savaplug on nothing with more intelligence than a mechanical thermostat. And even then, you show me savings of 20% and I'll show you me eating my hat!


Can you support what you're saying though? I'm genuinely interested as to why you think it doesn't work? You've just repeated what you said before.

Not having a go as I am looking at a number of power reduction strategies just now, inluding true voltage reduction for some commercial premises who have high inductive loads.

Plus, how big is your hat before I agree to any challenge. Are we talking trilby or sombrero sized? ;-)
#39
These posts are getting too technical for me.

Having read the reviews on the site, and some comments, it would seem whether or not this is a 'proper' air conditioner it will make a normal sized room cold. BOUGHT.
#40
Yeah, it'll make any normal sized room cold, while warming up the planet, making lots of noise and forcing you to empty its tank all the time. :p

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