AMD Ryzen 7 1700X CPU - 3.8GHz £299.14 + £5.48 Shipping @ Amazon.fr - HotUKDeals
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AMD Ryzen 7 1700X CPU - 3.8GHz £299.14 + £5.48 Shipping @ Amazon.fr £304.62

£304.62 @ Amazon France
Edit 2: Back at €349.99 = £299.14 Edit 1: Price went down from £321 to £302. Thanks nellygtfc Idealo: £360.10 @Ballicom / £363.79 @Amazon https://m.idealo.co.uk/compare/5406078/amd-ryzen-7-1700x… Read More
answark Avatar
3m, 1w agoFound 3 months, 1 week ago
Edit 2: Back at €349.99 = £299.14

Edit 1: Price went down from £321 to £302. Thanks nellygtfc

Idealo: £360.10 @Ballicom / £363.79 @Amazon https://m.idealo.co.uk/compare/5406078/amd-ryzen-7-1700x.html

Product

Product Type: 8 Core Processor

Series: AMD Ryzen

Socket: Socket Am4

Processor

Clock Speed: 3,400 Mhz

Number of Processing Cores: 8

Number of Threads: 16

Clock Frequency: 3.4 GHz

Turbo-CORE: yes

Max. Turbo Frequency: 3.8 GHz

Processor Code Name: Summit Ridge

TDP: 95 Watt

Manufacturing Process: 14 nm

Memory

L3 Cache: 16,384 KB

Additional Information

Manufacturer: AMD

Feature: SMT (Simultaneous Multithreading), x86-64, AMD-V, AMD VT, Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX), Advanced Vector Extensions 2.0 (AVX2), NX-Bit, TBT 3.0, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, SSE4a, AMD PowerNow, FMA3, FMA4
answark Avatar
3m, 1w agoFound 3 months, 1 week ago
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Top Comments

(3)
15 Likes
BetaRomeo
This is usually the part where a couple of defensive Ryzen pre-orderers claim that anyone with anything remotely negative to say about Ryzen must not have bought AMD CPUs 10 years ago... (no, I can't see the relevance either! And I've been buying AMD CPUs for 20 years!), and when it's pointed out that most reviews had some negative comments, respond that all the poor benchmarks will be fixed... sometime in the future (no, they probably won't).

Anyway, ignoring unprofessional comments from hardware amateurs for the moment, the common negative points mentioned by professional reviewers are the poor overclocking on the 1700X, the relatively poor gaming performance, and the poor price/performance if buying for gaming or certain productivity tasks (e.g. Photoshop).

£327 offsets the "overpriced" comments a great deal, however... but is it really worth any extra over the 1700, which seems to overclock better to match this chip (and the 1800X) anyway? Either way, for gaming, the cheaper i5-7600K would be better if you're looking to save money, and the i7-7700K would be better if this is exactly how much money you're looking to spend!


perhaps the 1st sentence describes you? :D
7 Likes
tempt
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. cinebench).
Could you say the same for the i7-7700K?
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. crazy max FSPs rates for lightly threaded games running at 720P).
There are plenty of things these 8C/16T Ryzen CPUs are good for not just Cinebench. Just as there are plenty of things where the Intel i7-6950K is better than the i7-7700K (aside from the price).

groenleader
Still seems like the Intel CPUs have the edge?
As always it depends on what you want from your CPU. If you only game and as long as those aren't something really well threaded, then the i7-7700K (especially with it's near 1GHz max clock advantage) is probably a better bet. But even games are slowly getting more threaded and 4C/8T can be near the limit when running BF1 especially if you also want to stream. Although DICE managed to mitigate BF1 problems with 4C/8T with their DX12 implementations so that the i7-7700K no longer gets beaten by Ryzen or the Intel LGA2011 HEDT chips.

Edited By: Gkains on Mar 19, 2017 10:09
6 Likes
This is usually the part where a couple of defensive Ryzen pre-orderers claim that anyone with anything remotely negative to say about Ryzen must not have bought AMD CPUs 10 years ago... (no, I can't see the relevance either! And I've been buying AMD CPUs for 20 years!), and when it's pointed out that most reviews had some negative comments, respond that all the poor benchmarks will be fixed... sometime in the future (no, they probably won't).

Anyway, ignoring unprofessional comments from hardware amateurs for the moment, the common negative points mentioned by professional reviewers are the poor overclocking on the 1700X, the relatively poor gaming performance, and the poor price/performance if buying for gaming or certain productivity tasks (e.g. Photoshop).

£327 offsets the "overpriced" comments a great deal, however... but is it really worth any extra over the 1700, which seems to overclock better to match this chip (and the 1800X) anyway? Either way, for gaming, the cheaper i5-7600K would be better if you're looking to save money, and the i7-7700K would be better if this is exactly how much money you're looking to spend!

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6 Likes #1
This is usually the part where a couple of defensive Ryzen pre-orderers claim that anyone with anything remotely negative to say about Ryzen must not have bought AMD CPUs 10 years ago... (no, I can't see the relevance either! And I've been buying AMD CPUs for 20 years!), and when it's pointed out that most reviews had some negative comments, respond that all the poor benchmarks will be fixed... sometime in the future (no, they probably won't).

Anyway, ignoring unprofessional comments from hardware amateurs for the moment, the common negative points mentioned by professional reviewers are the poor overclocking on the 1700X, the relatively poor gaming performance, and the poor price/performance if buying for gaming or certain productivity tasks (e.g. Photoshop).

£327 offsets the "overpriced" comments a great deal, however... but is it really worth any extra over the 1700, which seems to overclock better to match this chip (and the 1800X) anyway? Either way, for gaming, the cheaper i5-7600K would be better if you're looking to save money, and the i7-7700K would be better if this is exactly how much money you're looking to spend!
15 Likes #2
BetaRomeo
This is usually the part where a couple of defensive Ryzen pre-orderers claim that anyone with anything remotely negative to say about Ryzen must not have bought AMD CPUs 10 years ago... (no, I can't see the relevance either! And I've been buying AMD CPUs for 20 years!), and when it's pointed out that most reviews had some negative comments, respond that all the poor benchmarks will be fixed... sometime in the future (no, they probably won't).

Anyway, ignoring unprofessional comments from hardware amateurs for the moment, the common negative points mentioned by professional reviewers are the poor overclocking on the 1700X, the relatively poor gaming performance, and the poor price/performance if buying for gaming or certain productivity tasks (e.g. Photoshop).

£327 offsets the "overpriced" comments a great deal, however... but is it really worth any extra over the 1700, which seems to overclock better to match this chip (and the 1800X) anyway? Either way, for gaming, the cheaper i5-7600K would be better if you're looking to save money, and the i7-7700K would be better if this is exactly how much money you're looking to spend!


perhaps the 1st sentence describes you? :D
1 Like #3
I have never been a fan to "benchmark beating". Just like Chinese and US universities that changed aims to do well in reviews by targeting the benchmarks, out of context rather then the quality of the education as whole.

Still seems like the Intel CPUs have the edge?
3 Likes #4
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. cinebench).
7 Likes #5
tempt
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. cinebench).
Could you say the same for the i7-7700K?
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. crazy max FSPs rates for lightly threaded games running at 720P).
There are plenty of things these 8C/16T Ryzen CPUs are good for not just Cinebench. Just as there are plenty of things where the Intel i7-6950K is better than the i7-7700K (aside from the price).

groenleader
Still seems like the Intel CPUs have the edge?
As always it depends on what you want from your CPU. If you only game and as long as those aren't something really well threaded, then the i7-7700K (especially with it's near 1GHz max clock advantage) is probably a better bet. But even games are slowly getting more threaded and 4C/8T can be near the limit when running BF1 especially if you also want to stream. Although DICE managed to mitigate BF1 problems with 4C/8T with their DX12 implementations so that the i7-7700K no longer gets beaten by Ryzen or the Intel LGA2011 HEDT chips.

Edited By: Gkains on Mar 19, 2017 10:09
#6
These sound like they'd do well in video encoding ... The prices are still set for fans of amd tho, I expect they will drop after initial enthusiasm wanes ??
1 Like #7
Gkains
tempt
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. cinebench).
Could you say the same for the i7-7700K?
Still overpriced for a one trick pony (i.e. crazy max FSPs rates for lightly threaded games running at 720P).
Well, it also beats out Ryzen at 1080P.

And 1440P.

And 4K. (Yes, that's an overclocked 1700 vs a stock 7700K.)

More "FSPs" across the board, it seems, not to mention the other applications where it wins out. :p It seems your comment about "720P" revealed more about you than about the 7700K. ;)

Read the link in my first comment if you want the opinions of several professionals about how much Ryzen will catch up over the next few years.
1 Like #8
if you play games @ 4k, Ryzen is totally fine. however if you are fan of stone age 1080p then Ryzen is not for you.
2 Likes #9
From someone that actually owns a 1700, I'd recommend the 1700X at this price but note the lack of stock fan. Make sure whatever cooler you buy has an AM4 mount, Noctua are worth a look.

As for benchmarks, not getting in to it. Buy whatever fits your usage, if you want an older platform with more gaming focus choose Intel. If you want a slice of the future and you want a platform that has 3/4 years of CPU's for it, go AMD.

My 1700 is running at 3.9ghz on the stock fan with 3260mhz RAM nicely and isn't a toaster like a 7700k that would need a delid.
#10
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390

No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
#11
Uncommon.Sense
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390
No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
It was a lot higher when you posted your thread.
https://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/fr/B06X3W9NGG/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=all&fo=0&lang=en
#12
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390
No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
It was a lot higher when you posted your thread. https://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/fr/B06X3W9NGG/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=all&fo=0&lang=en

I'm not a thread abandoner (new word I just invented) like a lot of folk around here, if you looked you will see that I've updated it three times to reflect the decreasing prices from the same supplier.
2 Likes #13
Uncommon.Sense
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390
No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
It was a lot higher when you posted your thread. https://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/fr/B06X3W9NGG/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=all&fo=0&lang=en
I'm not a thread abandoner (new word I just invented) like a lot of folk around here, if you looked you will see that I've updated it three times to reflect the decreasing prices from the same supplier.
The latest price drop was updated on that thread only after the OP posted this deal. Do you expect people to not post new deals just because there is another thread at a higher price?
#14
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390
No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
It was a lot higher when you posted your thread. https://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/fr/B06X3W9NGG/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=all&fo=0&lang=en
I'm not a thread abandoner (new word I just invented) like a lot of folk around here, if you looked you will see that I've updated it three times to reflect the decreasing prices from the same supplier.
The latest price drop was updated on that thread only after the OP posted this deal. Do you expect people to not post new deals just because there is another thread at a higher price?

Oh, I'm sorry... I didn't realise I had to monitor it every minute, I updated it yesterday, and again today. After I had my price drop notification, in the e-mail that I don't check every single minute, my bad.. oops.
4 Likes #15
Uncommon.Sense
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
tempt
Uncommon.Sense
Duplicate of my thread here - http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/amd-ryzen-1700x-cpu-327-from-amazon-fr-2627110?p=30290390
No idea why people cannot use the blooming search function tbh.
It was a lot higher when you posted your thread. https://charts.camelcamelcamel.com/fr/B06X3W9NGG/amazon.png?force=1&zero=0&w=725&h=440&desired=false&legend=1&ilt=1&tp=all&fo=0&lang=en
I'm not a thread abandoner (new word I just invented) like a lot of folk around here, if you looked you will see that I've updated it three times to reflect the decreasing prices from the same supplier.
The latest price drop was updated on that thread only after the OP posted this deal. Do you expect people to not post new deals just because there is another thread at a higher price?
Oh, I'm sorry... I didn't realise I had to monitor it every minute, I updated it yesterday, and again today. After I had my price drop notification, in the e-mail that I don't check every single minute, my bad.. oops.

No you don't need to monitor, people posting new deals with updated prices are doing that for you, hence current situation works perfectly.
#16
if you play games on 1080p at 144hz this is not for hows every 1440p and 4k should be ok
#17
Looking at this vs 7700k, mixed reviews on this and all seems to be positive for the i7, mainly needed for photo editing etc!
#19
I think anyone thinking about buying these needs to consider how early this platform is in its life cycle and any comparisons should probably wait until the other AMD chips are out and the prices from both companies settle.
1 Like #20
The_Hoff
Buy whatever fits your usage, if you want an older platform with more gaming focus choose Intel. If you want a slice of the future and you want a platform that has 3/4 years of CPU's for it, go AMD.
Holy crap, the HUKD web engineer needs to get this website performance fixed. Comments made at the time of Bulldozer's release are only just starting to show up! oO

The_Hoff
My 1700 is running at 3.9ghz on the stock fan with 3260mhz RAM nicely and isn't a toaster like a 7700k that would need a delid.
Just make sure you budget extra for your electricity bill this month...

https://www.pcper.com/files/imagecache/article_max_width/review/2017-03-08/oc-power.png

Nearly double the load power consumption of the 7700K... oO
2 Likes #21
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.

The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.

Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
1 Like #22
vulcanproject
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.
The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.
Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
If the 1700, 1700X and 1800X prices are anything to go by, then the Ryzen 5 chips should have standard prices that are pretty much USD=GBP, maybe a little bit less in GBP. According to AMD, the 1600 is going to be $219, so I would guess that it'll be £200-220 in the UK.

https://cdn.videocardz.com/1/2017/03/AMD-Ryzen-5-3.jpg

As for the OC'ing potential of the 4 and 6 core chips, I'm unconvinced that they'll reliably achieve anything significant over the ~4Ghz the Ryzen 7 chips seem to manage, but I'd be more than happy to end up being wrong on that one. A ~£200 6 core, 12 thread CPU which could OC to the mid-4Ghz range could end up being something pretty special.
#23
matt101101
vulcanproject
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.
The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.
Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
If the 1700, 1700X and 1800X prices are anything to go by, then the Ryzen 5 chips should have standard prices that are pretty much USD=GBP, maybe a little bit less in GBP. According to AMD, the 1600 is going to be $219, so I would guess that it'll be £200-220 in the UK. https://cdn.videocardz.com/1/2017/03/AMD-Ryzen-5-3.jpg
As for the OC'ing potential of the 4 and 6 core chips, I'm unconvinced that they'll reliably achieve anything significant over the ~4Ghz the Ryzen 7 chips seem to manage, but I'd be more than happy to end up being wrong on that one. A ~£200 6 core, 12 thread CPU which could OC to the mid-4Ghz range could end up being something pretty special.

The overclocking is a problem if it is aimed at gaming enthusiasts. I don't think Ryzen is a very well refined architecture and could struggle to go beyond 4GHz on any Ryzen chip. The lower clocks of even the 4 core versions seems to be a very early indicator of AMD's problems binning faster chips. It could be a major problem for the future of the design too, unless lots of silicon revisions can improve it significantly.

If you can get the 6 cores consistently to like 4.2-4.4GHz then it'll be the best compromise of multi thread and single thread performance for a mainstream price. If you can get the 4 cores to like 4.5ghz then that would be respectable if not scorching. If you can't, then alarm bells will start to ring for all the mainstream parts and future of the architecture.
#24
vulcanproject
matt101101
vulcanproject
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.
The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.
Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
If the 1700, 1700X and 1800X prices are anything to go by, then the Ryzen 5 chips should have standard prices that are pretty much USD=GBP, maybe a little bit less in GBP. According to AMD, the 1600 is going to be $219, so I would guess that it'll be £200-220 in the UK. https://cdn.videocardz.com/1/2017/03/AMD-Ryzen-5-3.jpg
As for the OC'ing potential of the 4 and 6 core chips, I'm unconvinced that they'll reliably achieve anything significant over the ~4Ghz the Ryzen 7 chips seem to manage, but I'd be more than happy to end up being wrong on that one. A ~£200 6 core, 12 thread CPU which could OC to the mid-4Ghz range could end up being something pretty special.
The overclocking is a problem if it is aimed at gaming enthusiasts. I don't think Ryzen is a very well refined architecture and could struggle to go beyond 4GHz on any Ryzen chip. The lower clocks of even the 4 core versions seems to be a very early indicator of AMD's problems binning faster chips. It could be a major problem for the future of the design too, unless lots of silicon revisions can improve it significantly.
If you can get the 6 cores consistently to like 4.4GHz then it'll be the best compromise of multi thread and single thread performance for a mainstream price. If you can't, then alarm bells will start to ring for all the mainstream parts and future of the architecture.
Yes, and there's no convincing argument that the 6 and 4 core Ryzen 5 chips aren't aimed squarely at gamers; they don't have the thread count for for massively multi-threaded professional workloads and "normal" consumers don't buy CPUs with that much power, because they simply don't need them. In terms of PC hardware, in this case CPUs, the market between professionals and "normal" consumers is often higher end PC gamers.

At this point, I'm inclined to agree that I don't think AMD can get these CPUs to reliably clock much higher that ~4Ghz using normal air or water cooling. Obviously, I'd be happy for April 11th to roll around and end up looking like a fool for being totally wrong; a 4.4 or 4.5Ghz, SMT enabled, 4 or 6 core chip for between £170 and £250 (judging by AMD's USD figures for Ryzen 5) would be fantastic for AMD and consumers alike.
#25
My 7700K 5Ghz does every thing i need it to do! lol
1 Like #26
mcgill322
Looking at this vs 7700k, mixed reviews on this and all seems to be positive for the i7, mainly needed for photo editing etc!
photo editing? then what you need is a ryzen chip no question. Most photo editing programs are optimized to make use of higher core counts. 7700k is a 4 core 8 thread chip. all the Ryzen 7 chips have 8 core 16 threads and will beat out the 7700k by a large margin. If you do go for a ryzen chip either go for this deal here or a ryzen 1700, the 1700 comes with a capable cooler comparable to an £20 after market cooler.
1 Like #27
matt101101
vulcanproject
matt101101
vulcanproject
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.
The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.
Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
If the 1700, 1700X and 1800X prices are anything to go by, then the Ryzen 5 chips should have standard prices that are pretty much USD=GBP, maybe a little bit less in GBP. According to AMD, the 1600 is going to be $219, so I would guess that it'll be £200-220 in the UK. https://cdn.videocardz.com/1/2017/03/AMD-Ryzen-5-3.jpg
As for the OC'ing potential of the 4 and 6 core chips, I'm unconvinced that they'll reliably achieve anything significant over the ~4Ghz the Ryzen 7 chips seem to manage, but I'd be more than happy to end up being wrong on that one. A ~£200 6 core, 12 thread CPU which could OC to the mid-4Ghz range could end up being something pretty special.
The overclocking is a problem if it is aimed at gaming enthusiasts. I don't think Ryzen is a very well refined architecture and could struggle to go beyond 4GHz on any Ryzen chip. The lower clocks of even the 4 core versions seems to be a very early indicator of AMD's problems binning faster chips. It could be a major problem for the future of the design too, unless lots of silicon revisions can improve it significantly.
If you can get the 6 cores consistently to like 4.4GHz then it'll be the best compromise of multi thread and single thread performance for a mainstream price. If you can't, then alarm bells will start to ring for all the mainstream parts and future of the architecture.
Yes, and there's no convincing argument that the 6 and 4 core Ryzen 5 chips aren't aimed squarely at gamers; they don't have the thread count for for massively multi-threaded professional workloads and "normal" consumers don't buy CPUs with that much power, because they simply don't need them. In terms of PC hardware, in this case CPUs, the market between professionals and "normal" consumers is often higher end PC gamers.
At this point, I'm inclined to agree that I don't think AMD can get these CPUs to reliably clock much higher that ~4Ghz using normal air or water cooling. Obviously, I'd be happy for April 11th to roll around and end up looking like a fool for being totally wrong; a 4.4 or 4.5Ghz, SMT enabled, 4 or 6 core chip for between £170 and £250 (judging by AMD's USD figures for Ryzen 5) would be fantastic for AMD and consumers alike.

Yeah, realistically the 4C/8T and 6C/12T are aimed squarely at the gaming enthusiasts just like the 7600 and 7770K are at their price point and unlocked multipliers.

None of these Ryzens have integrated graphics so it's absolutely NOT for the wide OEM market. They have to actually perform in games 1080p-1440p and overclock, no excuses.
3 Likes #28
BetaRomeo
Just make sure you budget extra for your electricity bill this month...https://www.pcper.com/files/imagecache/article_max_width/review/2017-03-08/oc-power.png
Nearly double the load power consumption of the 7700K... oO
Er, come again? Ever heard of race to idle?
That's the max power while running Cinebench, so from the same PCPer review, you forgot to include a rather important metric, what each CPU scores:
https://www.pcper.com/files/imagecache/article_max_width/review/2017-02-27/cb15-2.png

The Ryzen 7 1800X scores about 166% of the i7-7700k's scores, but only uses 120% of the power (both running at stock) making the Ryzen a lot more efficient at this task. In fact, for efficiency for CineBench (CB per Watt) Ryzen is only beaten by Intel's i7-6950X which has 10C/20T and lists at $1,723. Here's the summary of those two PCPer results against each other:
https://i.imgur.com/etPbX38.png

Now overclocking does of course change that but that will apply to all the other CPUs too. Yes, the Ryzen platform is still a bit immature (wonder if some beancounter at AMD stopped them spending money on getting the Excavator based Bristol Ridge into retail; if they had then there wouldn't have been this crazy motherboard shortage for Ryzen like now), but perf/watt is no longer something AMD have to worry about.

Higher clock speeds would of course be nice as at 5GHz, Ryzen would be a lot better for games but the current GF process is really not suited for high speeds. So much so, that I would imagine the Ryzen 7 1700 running at stock would get a lot better CB/watt than the 1700X or the 1800X. Bodes well Ryzen as a server or mobile chip, but less so for playing poorly threaded games (Fallout4 with lots of scripted mods seems to be one of the worst).

The real question for high-clocking Ryzen is whether AMD have another process they can use as the Samsung/GlobalFoundries 14nm LPP is not meant for high frequencies and its ideal clock is below 3.3GHz (The ideal frequency range for the process or the design (as a whole) appears to be 2.1 - 3.3GHz (25mV per 100MHz). Above this region (>= 3.3GHz) the voltage scaling gradually deteriorates to 40 - 100mV+ per 100MHz.see this thread[/url]):
The ideal frequency range for the process or the design (as a whole) appears to be 2.1 - 3.3GHz (25mV per 100MHz). Above this region (>= 3.3GHz) the voltage scaling gradually deteriorates to 40 - 100mV+ per 100MHz.

As I said for server or mobile this LPP is probably about as good as can be, but for desktop the LPE would be better. But whether AMD consider that worth their while ATM is another question. Probably from a pure sales point of view it is not, but then they tend to ignore the effect a halo 5GHz Ryzen part would have on their other sales.
#29
vulcanproject
matt101101
vulcanproject
matt101101
vulcanproject
Unless you know you NEED 8 cores you just don't. Virtually nobody does for home use.
The best Ryzen for the mainstream consumer could potentially be the 1600. IF it isn't too much more than £200 in the UK and IF it over clocks higher than these 8 core parts. Two condition TBD. Then it'll be a bargain.
Otherwise forget it and buy intel for home desktop use.
If the 1700, 1700X and 1800X prices are anything to go by, then the Ryzen 5 chips should have standard prices that are pretty much USD=GBP, maybe a little bit less in GBP. According to AMD, the 1600 is going to be $219, so I would guess that it'll be £200-220 in the UK. https://cdn.videocardz.com/1/2017/03/AMD-Ryzen-5-3.jpg
As for the OC'ing potential of the 4 and 6 core chips, I'm unconvinced that they'll reliably achieve anything significant over the ~4Ghz the Ryzen 7 chips seem to manage, but I'd be more than happy to end up being wrong on that one. A ~£200 6 core, 12 thread CPU which could OC to the mid-4Ghz range could end up being something pretty special.
The overclocking is a problem if it is aimed at gaming enthusiasts. I don't think Ryzen is a very well refined architecture and could struggle to go beyond 4GHz on any Ryzen chip. The lower clocks of even the 4 core versions seems to be a very early indicator of AMD's problems binning faster chips. It could be a major problem for the future of the design too, unless lots of silicon revisions can improve it significantly.
If you can get the 6 cores consistently to like 4.4GHz then it'll be the best compromise of multi thread and single thread performance for a mainstream price. If you can't, then alarm bells will start to ring for all the mainstream parts and future of the architecture.
Yes, and there's no convincing argument that the 6 and 4 core Ryzen 5 chips aren't aimed squarely at gamers; they don't have the thread count for for massively multi-threaded professional workloads and "normal" consumers don't buy CPUs with that much power, because they simply don't need them. In terms of PC hardware, in this case CPUs, the market between professionals and "normal" consumers is often higher end PC gamers.
At this point, I'm inclined to agree that I don't think AMD can get these CPUs to reliably clock much higher that ~4Ghz using normal air or water cooling. Obviously, I'd be happy for April 11th to roll around and end up looking like a fool for being totally wrong; a 4.4 or 4.5Ghz, SMT enabled, 4 or 6 core chip for between £170 and £250 (judging by AMD's USD figures for Ryzen 5) would be fantastic for AMD and consumers alike.
Yeah, realistically the 4C/8T and 6C/12T are aimed squarely at the gaming enthusiasts just like the 7600 and 7770K are at their price point and unlocked multipliers.
None of these Ryzens have integrated graphics so it's absolutely NOT for the wide OEM market. They have to actually perform in games 1080p-1440p and overclock, no excuses.
My guess is people are going to argue that these Ryzen 5 chips, even the high end ones, can only fairly be compared to the 7600k due to the £300+ price of the 7700k.

I'd forgotten about Ryzen not having an iGPU, that pretty much means it's only for the enthusiast market. OEMs won't care until the APUs come out and they can use one chip for CPU and graphics.

As you say, Ryzen 5 must perform competitively in 1080p and 1440p gaming, the resolution people actually play at (which is still mainly 1080p). There's no hiding behind being "designed for 4k gaming" or any other excuse to move the bottleneck to the GPU when you're talking about systems with ~£200 CPUs.

Roll on April 11th; all will become clear, I'm sure.
#30
matt101101
Roll on April 11th; all will become clear, I'm sure.
I wonder if everything will even be sorted by then. Obviously some the BIOS's were getting almost daily updates so that should be mostly sorted, but looking at some of the performance variations reviewers had (especially with games) with SMT on/off, memory clocks, Windows power saving etc.
While Ryzen would really like a change to the Windows scheduler (for the Ryzen's with more than one CCX), it looks like Microsoft said no to that. However, a power profile might do, if these Project Cars results are any indication:
https://i.imgur.com/qu7hpOo.png
#31
Ryzen is not a consideration if you want to use the PC for 4K streaming or with 4K UHD drives because both as of now only work wih Intel CPUs.
1 Like #32
Can't wait for Ryzen 5 because it's more suited for gamers and also within my budget :)
#33
tempt
Ryzen is not a consideration if you want to use the PC for 4K streaming or with 4K UHD drives because both as of now only work wih Intel CPUs.

Which also includes the 99% of the CPU's already in the world that are not 7th Gen Intel CPU's. I guess people will just wait for some GPU's to be made compatible, and hopefully more browsers.
#34
The thing is the Windows OS isn't even optimized properly to make use of all of the CPU cores on Ryzen. Once that update comes I think we will see a difference in all of the benchmarks.
1 Like #35
Hate it when people cite the future (DX12, better multi-threaded gaming design) etc etc. Fact is everyone was underwhelmed by the gaming performance of these chips. Great if you're doing some number grinding or encoding, but if it's gaming or a mix of them, then it's difficult to exchange fps loss in gaming for a few seconds made up on encoding.

These chips are nicely priced and fill in a market gap, but the wow factor has all but disappeared.

People are really leaning on the extra core and thread count. It's literally only part of the picture, the intels core clocks and per core performance are still making them very suitable in real world applications.


Edited By: dezontk on Mar 19, 2017 22:48: .
1 Like #36
arealmentalist
mcgill322
Looking at this vs 7700k, mixed reviews on this and all seems to be positive for the i7, mainly needed for photo editing etc!
photo editing? then what you need is a ryzen chip no question. Most photo editing programs are optimized to make use of higher core counts. 7700k is a 4 core 8 thread chip. all the Ryzen 7 chips have 8 core 16 threads and will beat out the 7700k by a large margin. If you do go for a ryzen chip either go for this deal here or a ryzen 1700, the 1700 comes with a capable cooler comparable to an £20 after market cooler.

Wrong.

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Photoshop-CC-2017-AMD-Ryzen-7-1700X-1800X-Performance-907/
2 Likes #37
These processors are great for gaming, anyone that says otherwise is clueless. Its the same as saying the 6700k, 6600k, 2600k, etc, etc, are poor for gaming - nonsense. The 2500k and 2600k have been perfectly fine as gaming CPUs for the last 6 years, and even older CPUs are still fine for 1080p gaming.

Just because they're not the fastest doesn't mean they're not good for gaming. If your new PC build is CPU bound for gaming you're doing it wrong.
2 Likes #38
nickkelly
These processors are great for gaming, anyone that says otherwise is clueless. Its the same as saying the 6700k, 6600k, 2600k, etc, etc, are poor for gaming - nonsense. The 2500k and 2600k have been perfectly fine as gaming CPUs for the last 6 years, and even older CPUs are still fine for 1080p gaming.
Just because they're not the fastest doesn't mean they're not good for gaming. If your new PC build is CPU bound for gaming you're doing it wrong.

Great no doubt, but behind the older intels.
1 Like #39
Bigspin
if you play games @ 4k, Ryzen is totally fine. however if you are fan of stone age 1080p then Ryzen is not for you.


Stone age? Are there any 4K monitors out there which will give me that res and 144Hz refresh rate?
#40
djames108
BetaRomeo
This is usually the part where a couple of defensive Ryzen pre-orderers claim that anyone with anything remotely negative to say about Ryzen must not have bought AMD CPUs 10 years ago... (no, I can't see the relevance either! And I've been buying AMD CPUs for 20 years!), and when it's pointed out that most reviews had some negative comments, respond that all the poor benchmarks will be fixed... sometime in the future (no, they probably won't).
Anyway, ignoring unprofessional comments from hardware amateurs for the moment, the common negative points mentioned by professional reviewers are the poor overclocking on the 1700X, the relatively poor gaming performance, and the poor price/performance if buying for gaming or certain productivity tasks (e.g. Photoshop).
£327 offsets the "overpriced" comments a great deal, however... but is it really worth any extra over the 1700, which seems to overclock better to match this chip (and the 1800X) anyway? Either way, for gaming, the cheaper i5-7600K would be better if you're looking to save money, and the i7-7700K would be better if this is exactly how much money you're looking to spend!
perhaps the 1st sentence describes you? :D
No, I didn't pre-order Ryzen..? And considering the reviews, I haven't subsequently bought a Ryzen chip, either. The main performance concern on my PCs would be gaming.

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