Apple MB535B/A Mac Pro - £1847.80 @ eBay Currys/PC World Outlet - HotUKDeals
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great price for Apple MB535B/A Mac Pro

for the graphic designers/film makers etc out there or the people who just simply love apple this is a great deal
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yoyo59 Avatar
5y, 8m agoFound 5 years, 8 months ago
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#1
The Octocore mac pros aren't the best for most uses, due to the low clock speed they are significantly slower in most applications which can't utilise the extra cores effectively. I'd only recommend it if you are using an application that can scale effectively across all the cores.

This is also the old model, running leopard. Not a great deal, there are several of the quad cores in the refurb store for a bit less that may be faster for most uses.
#2
I'm guessing there's no graphic designers/film makers here then
2 Likes #3
Garasand
I'm guessing there's no graphic designers/film makers here then

I do, but most Apple stuff smacks of crap. I mean a "design pc" that only has a Geforce 120 and old Xeons? for £1847?! Only a serious iFan would buy it.
#4
"smacks of crap" - holy ****, it's meant to be Easter Sunday, those sorts of thoughts shouldn't be entering my head
#5
Getting cold in here...
Overprice rubbish IMO.
#6
2x 2.66GHz Quad-Core cpu uhmmm... sound goods X)
#7
cyborgk
2x 2.66GHz Quad-Core cpu uhmmm... sound goods X)

Except as I explained in my first post most of those are going to be sat idle in most software.
#8
I have to say, when it comes to the Mac Pro, it's one of the few cases where you're actually better off building a Hackintosh, for the following reasons:

- Building a PC with like-for-like parts will mean you run into much fewer compatibility problems (since you can buy only parts which are known to work perfectly), compared to laptop implementations of Hackintosh (where there are usually a few caveats/compromises in terms of hardware). It also means you can put much more powerful hardware (subject to compatibility) inside AND upgrade along with times (i.e. switch out the motherboard and processor as time progresses).

- You are not really getting the benefits of Apple's Aesthetics/R&D (the Mac Pro will be under your desk, not exactly a show piece), but still the huge price tag.

- If you really want to keep the aesthetic appeal you'd need to buy the ridiculously overpriced (and I mean ridiculously overpriced) Apple Cinema display, kind of defeating the part of the purpose of buying native mac hardware.
2 Likes #9
Garasand
I'm guessing there's no graphic designers/film makers here then


I think you need to stop being so short-sighted. For graphics design Windows runs (and indeed is the original development platform for) Photoshop probably the most important tool in a graphic designers arsenal, along with the rest of the Adobe suite of products.

The only real advantage a mac has is being able to run Final Cut Pro which admittedly is an industry standard. BUT...so is Premiere Pro by Adobe, and the differences in functionality are mostly academic, with one usually playing catch-up with the other and vice-versa.

I'm sure that many design firms use Macs to keep up with the aesthetic and cool appeal but anyone suggesting you can't get serious work done on a Windows machine is dead wrong. I hate Apple haters as much as Fanboys, but in the case of the Mac Pro I think common sense prevails.
#10
Xeijin

I think you need to stop being so short-sighted. For graphics design Windows runs (and indeed is the original development platform for) Photoshop probably the most important tool in a graphic designers arsenal, along with the rest of the Adobe suite of products.


Odd re-write of history you got going on there...

Photoshop Development

Early history
In 1987, Thomas Knoll, a PhD student at the University of Michigan began writing a program on his Macintosh Plus to display grayscale images on a monochrome display. This program, called Display, caught the attention of his brother John Knoll, an Industrial Light & Magic employee, who recommended Thomas turn it into a fully-fledged image editing program. Thomas took a six month break from his studies in 1988 to collaborate with his brother on the program, which had been renamed ImagePro.[3] Later that year, Thomas renamed his program Photoshop and worked out a short-term deal with scanner manufacturer Barneyscan to distribute copies of the program with a slide scanner; a "total of about 200 copies of Photoshop were shipped" this way.[4]

During this time, John traveled to Silicon Valley and gave a demonstration of the program to engineers at Apple and Russell Brown, art director at Adobe. Both showings were successful, and Adobe decided to purchase the license to distribute in September 1988.[3] While John worked on plug-ins in California, Thomas remained in Ann Arbor writing program code. Photoshop 1.0 was released in 1990 for Macintosh exclusively.[5]

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