Argos ASUS touch screen laptop including Office 2013 £299 - HotUKDeals
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Great little notebook which I bought today from Argos. It was £289 on Ebuyer but Argos also include £25 Windows Sore voucher with this.

Its 10.1 inches so you compromise screen size for touch screen capability but you really need touch screen to be able to use Windows 8 properly.

Its not advertised as including Office 2013, I even got asked if I wanted it adding for £99.99 which I declined. However this DOES include COA inside the box and has the full package bundled with the machine making this a real steal for the price as hardly any budget-mid range computers include this nowadays.

Using it now and it is pretty nippy, think the battery is going to do a good 5 hours, only downside is no DVD or CD drive but tbh, old technology anyway!
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edwood Avatar
2y, 10m agoFound 2 years, 10 months ago
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#1
This or Asus T100?
#2
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.
#3
1.0 GHz Processor.Only.Suprise.Suprise.
#4
cautionsoap
1.0 GHz Processor.Only.Suprise.Suprise.

Faster than the last Windows 8 machine I had with supposedly twice the processing power.
#5
It's bundled as standard with MS Office. Asus Website

Still, it's cheaper than everywhere else if you include the voucher, so have some heat.
#6
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.
4 Likes #7
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

Edited By: fishmaster on Nov 25, 2013 07:57
2 Likes #8
This laptop is a piece of rubbish. Why on earth does everything go hot these days?
2 Likes #9
ProPiers
This laptop is a piece of rubbish. Why on earth does everything go hot these days?

Try and be a little more constructive and helpful to the community with your statement. Whilst you may well be right try and point out why it 'is a piece of rubbish'. Is it the cost? The specs vs cost? The build quality? What would be a viable alternative?
1 Like #10
ProPiers
This laptop is a piece of rubbish. Why on earth does everything go hot these days?


yes......be helpful

im after a new laptop and up until your comment I was going to commit.
1 Like #11
Erm yeah this processor is very bad performance wise, my old Acer Ferrari one actually out performs this and had a discreet graphics card, and that came out almost 4 years ago.

For this kind size and portability i would recommend tracking down an old acer Ferrari one or wait for manufacturers to start using the new quad core atom processors which will out perform these by almost twice the performance for the same price.

Edited By: armindo on Nov 25, 2013 10:26
1 Like #12
'bad' is relative... I've not used this laptop, so I'm not going to go out of my way to defend it, but I'm fairly certain that for normal light web use, a bit of Office editing, and some photo handling, this is more than capable for 80% of comuter users, and represents a fair bargain.
If you think you will be gaming on it, or handling photoshop, think again.
#13
fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

Never said this WAS like a tablet. I know it isn't. However:

The T100 IS like a netbook but you can use it as a tablet as well. It's getting rave reviews and it's the 1st bit of affordable kit (windows RT bracket) that operates full windows 8.1, has Office 2013 and has battery life of over 8 hours.

The 1st reply on here was a question. This netbook or the T100. For 50 quid more, I'd personally opt for the T100 because I think it offers something more than the netbook listed here and is good value.
#14
This is what puts me off, same processor as acer V5 and the reviews for that are very poor:

Compared to almost any other laptop, the V5-121 is painfully slow and underpowered. It doesn't struggle too much if you're running a web browser with just a couple of open tabs, watching a video or creating an office document, but even the most basic bit of multitasking, such as opening a photo in the default Windows 8 image viewer while installing another piece of software, makes it grind to a halt.
http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/laptops/1302325/acer-v5-121
1 Like #15
This is a useless netbook with a touch screen gimmick - how is that a deal?
#16
yanzui
fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

Never said this WAS like a tablet. I know it isn't. However:

The T100 IS like a netbook but you can use it as a tablet as well. It's getting rave reviews and it's the 1st bit of affordable kit (windows RT bracket) that operates full windows 8.1, has Office 2013 and has battery life of over 8 hours.

The 1st reply on here was a question. This netbook or the T100. For 50 quid more, I'd personally opt for the T100 because I think it offers something more than the netbook listed here and is good value.



Thanks for replying. I was unsure whether to buy this or the T100. My brother has offered to pick me up a T100 from the US (£230 after US tax), so it's a bit of a no-brainer :)
#17
zerospin
yanzui
fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.
The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.
This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices. Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.
Never said this WAS like a tablet. I know it isn't. However:The T100 IS like a netbook but you can use it as a tablet as well. It's getting rave reviews and it's the 1st bit of affordable kit (windows RT bracket) that operates full windows 8.1, has Office 2013 and has battery life of over 8 hours.The 1st reply on here was a question. This netbook or the T100. For 50 quid more, I'd personally opt for the T100 because I think it offers something more than the netbook listed here and is good value.
Thanks for replying. I was unsure whether to buy this or the T100. My brother has offered to pick me up a T100 from the US (£230 after US tax), so it's a bit of a no-brainer :)

Crikey, can he get me one too? :D
#18
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.
#19
bilbob
zerospin
yanzui
fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.
The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.
This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices. Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.
Never said this WAS like a tablet. I know it isn't. However:The T100 IS like a netbook but you can use it as a tablet as well. It's getting rave reviews and it's the 1st bit of affordable kit (windows RT bracket) that operates full windows 8.1, has Office 2013 and has battery life of over 8 hours.The 1st reply on here was a question. This netbook or the T100. For 50 quid more, I'd personally opt for the T100 because I think it offers something more than the netbook listed here and is good value.
Thanks for replying. I was unsure whether to buy this or the T100. My brother has offered to pick me up a T100 from the US (£230 after US tax), so it's a bit of a no-brainer :)

Crikey, can he get me one too? :D

Ask him to look for a decent case for it. I reckon 3 months before anything decent and specifically designed for the T100 is available over here. As per usual, they'll be more expensive as well.
1 Like #20
fishmaster
This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices. Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

Yes, yes you have, on just about every touchscreen that is on here...
#21
Windows 8 is not great anyway and without the touchscreen its useless. Amazon refunded my full cost of a W8 laptop I just returned to them that I bought in Dec 2012, no questions asked.

There is a better desktop functionality with this version. Having experienced W8 without touchscreen, I would never buy a laptop with this OS if it was a standard screen as there is no point.

Yes Office 2013 is standard with this product, but Argos don't advertise this fact so if you are comparing a similar priced product on their site you need to take into account the £99 cost.
#22
I'm not sure how much better the Intel in this performs, but it could be a better deal if you don't need the free office software.

http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/laptops-netbooks/laptops/laptops/asus-x200ca-ct112h-touchscreen-11-6-laptop-21712964-pdt.html
2 Likes #23
tomhl
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.

I work for a company that buys and sells computer equipment, I've done this retail for 7 years, I know what works and doesn't work for the customer, like I said there's exceptions to every rule, but in general you don't need the touchscreen. I've used 100s of laptops with touchscreens. Do what I suggest below and you'll learn something :)

My suggestion - learn how to use the touchpad, it takes a couple of minutes to learn how to use Windows 8/8.1 with the touchpad, then you won't need the touchscreen. Two fingers in a vertical swipe up and down will scroll left and right, edge swipe gestures bring app manager and charms menu in to view, dead easy, makes more sense than a touchscreen. My tip on Windows 8 is to disable the "When I swipe in from left edge change the next open app" or words to that effect in settings, then it will bring out an app manager where you can right click and close apps easily, no need to vertical swipe down to close modern UI apps.



Edited By: fishmaster on Nov 25, 2013 15:37: <>
#24
bilbob
zerospin
yanzui
fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.
The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.
This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices. Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.
Never said this WAS like a tablet. I know it isn't. However:The T100 IS like a netbook but you can use it as a tablet as well. It's getting rave reviews and it's the 1st bit of affordable kit (windows RT bracket) that operates full windows 8.1, has Office 2013 and has battery life of over 8 hours.The 1st reply on here was a question. This netbook or the T100. For 50 quid more, I'd personally opt for the T100 because I think it offers something more than the netbook listed here and is good value.
Thanks for replying. I was unsure whether to buy this or the T100. My brother has offered to pick me up a T100 from the US (£230 after US tax), so it's a bit of a no-brainer :)

Crikey, can he get me one too? :D

Annoyingly, the 64GB version dropped to $349 only a few days ago...but I just wasn't sure at the time whether it was for me. Even at $379, it's still a bargain (exchange rate helps :) ).
1 Like #25
ProPiers
This laptop is a piece of rubbish. Why on earth does everything go hot these days?
Everybody - don't let trolls like this fella wind you up. Just ignore until they post useful critism or even better, a better deal !
#26
Has come in handy today as son was off school sick, think he has watched movies all day!
#27
fishmaster
tomhl
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.

I work for a company that buys and sells computer equipment, I've done this retail for 7 years, I know what works and doesn't work for the customer, like I said there's exceptions to every rule, but in general you don't need the touchscreen. I've used 100s of laptops with touchscreens. Do what I suggest below and you'll learn something :)

My suggestion - learn how to use the touchpad, it takes a couple of minutes to learn how to use Windows 8/8.1 with the touchpad, then you won't need the touchscreen. Two fingers in a vertical swipe up and down will scroll left and right, edge swipe gestures bring app manager and charms menu in to view, dead easy, makes more sense than a touchscreen. My tip on Windows 8 is to disable the "When I swipe in from left edge change the next open app" or words to that effect in settings, then it will bring out an app manager where you can right click and close apps easily, no need to vertical swipe down to close modern UI apps.



Unfortunately your suggestions are not very helpful. I guess everyone knows the two-finger gestures you mentioned unless 1) they don't use touchpad at all; 2) not clever enough; 3) the touchpad doesn't support multi-touch.
In fact some laptop brands, Asus for example, even develops their own enhanced touchpad software (ASUS Smart Gesture) to support more gestures including three-fingers gestures like swipe up to show and navigate running apps. That shows the current foreground app at the center of the screen with a X at top right corner to close it with only one click.
That is better than your second tip where only apps hidden in background are shown in the left apps bar, so you still have to use the swipe down from top gesture to close foreground app or to minimise/switch to another app before swipe from left edge > right click the app > click close.
Keep in mind this is not available for all touchpads. Besides, you still cannot solve my 2 problems in my earlier post without a touchscreen.
#28
tomhl
fishmaster
tomhl
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.

I work for a company that buys and sells computer equipment, I've done this retail for 7 years, I know what works and doesn't work for the customer, like I said there's exceptions to every rule, but in general you don't need the touchscreen. I've used 100s of laptops with touchscreens. Do what I suggest below and you'll learn something :)

My suggestion - learn how to use the touchpad, it takes a couple of minutes to learn how to use Windows 8/8.1 with the touchpad, then you won't need the touchscreen. Two fingers in a vertical swipe up and down will scroll left and right, edge swipe gestures bring app manager and charms menu in to view, dead easy, makes more sense than a touchscreen. My tip on Windows 8 is to disable the "When I swipe in from left edge change the next open app" or words to that effect in settings, then it will bring out an app manager where you can right click and close apps easily, no need to vertical swipe down to close modern UI apps.



Unfortunately your suggestions are not very helpful. I guess everyone knows the two-finger gestures you mentioned unless 1) they don't use touchpad at all; 2) not clever enough; 3) the touchpad doesn't support multi-touch.
In fact some laptop brands, Asus for example, even develops their own enhanced touchpad software (ASUS Smart Gesture) to support more gestures including three-fingers gestures like swipe up to show and navigate running apps. That shows the current foreground app at the center of the screen with a X at top right corner to close it with only one click.
That is better than your second tip where only apps hidden in background are shown in the left apps bar, so you still have to use the swipe down from top gesture to close foreground app or to minimise/switch to another app before swipe from left edge > right click the app > click close.
Keep in mind this is not available for all touchpads. Besides, you still cannot solve my 2 problems in my earlier post without a touchscreen.

1. Using the keyboard is faster on a laptop than a touchscreen keyboard
2. Personally I never use that apps screen, I use the type to search which is faster. I never need to see all my apps on one screen. Windows 8.1 can also be set to show the All Apps screen instead of the modern interface.
3. Windows 8.1 doesn't have the best design, however it is the only popular system in the world that has tried to marry a desktop and touchscreen based UI together.
4. Laptop manufacturers are trying various different ideas such as the Acer R7 Hinge. Putting the touchpad near the screen is possibly where the touchpad should always have been, that would do away with the typing issues.

Touchscreens work best on handheld devices, they don't work as well on laptops/desktops as I've already explained as the focus is taken from the natural position to the touching the screen. Windows 8.1 doesn't make a case for having a touchscreen on a laptop, it just makes the case that Microsoft haven't got things right yet. What you're saying is that because you have a touchscreen you are making a case for using it. Where as I'm typing on a laptop now that doesn't have a touchscreen and I have Windows 8.1 running on it. Had I paid £100 or so extra for a laptop that did have the facility or a cheaper touchscreen laptop that lacked power I wouldn't have gained anything productivity wise.

Remember you're paying for that touchscreen, so you're either paying more or sacrificing power, however you aren't gaining a significant amount of productivity usage from a laptop/desktop platform that uses a touchscreen. Whilst you personally may find a touchscreen more useful, you'll find that most people who buy a laptop with a touchscreen won't use the feature very often. There's always exceptions to the rule, you being one, but in general touchscreens aren't a necessity on a laptop platform.

Edited By: fishmaster on Dec 01, 2013 10:43
#29
fishmaster
tomhl
fishmaster
tomhl
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.

I work for a company that buys and sells computer equipment, I've done this retail for 7 years, I know what works and doesn't work for the customer, like I said there's exceptions to every rule, but in general you don't need the touchscreen. I've used 100s of laptops with touchscreens. Do what I suggest below and you'll learn something :)

My suggestion - learn how to use the touchpad, it takes a couple of minutes to learn how to use Windows 8/8.1 with the touchpad, then you won't need the touchscreen. Two fingers in a vertical swipe up and down will scroll left and right, edge swipe gestures bring app manager and charms menu in to view, dead easy, makes more sense than a touchscreen. My tip on Windows 8 is to disable the "When I swipe in from left edge change the next open app" or words to that effect in settings, then it will bring out an app manager where you can right click and close apps easily, no need to vertical swipe down to close modern UI apps.



Unfortunately your suggestions are not very helpful. I guess everyone knows the two-finger gestures you mentioned unless 1) they don't use touchpad at all; 2) not clever enough; 3) the touchpad doesn't support multi-touch.
In fact some laptop brands, Asus for example, even develops their own enhanced touchpad software (ASUS Smart Gesture) to support more gestures including three-fingers gestures like swipe up to show and navigate running apps. That shows the current foreground app at the center of the screen with a X at top right corner to close it with only one click.
That is better than your second tip where only apps hidden in background are shown in the left apps bar, so you still have to use the swipe down from top gesture to close foreground app or to minimise/switch to another app before swipe from left edge > right click the app > click close.
Keep in mind this is not available for all touchpads. Besides, you still cannot solve my 2 problems in my earlier post without a touchscreen.

1. Using the keyboard is faster on a laptop than a touchscreen keyboard
2. Personally I never use that apps screen, I use the type to search which is faster. I never need to see all my apps on one screen. Windows 8.1 can also be set to show the All Apps screen instead of the modern interface.
3. Windows 8.1 doesn't have the best design, however it is the only popular system in the world that has tried to marry a desktop and touchscreen based UI together.
4. Laptop manufacturers are trying various different ideas such as the Acer R7 Hinge. Putting the touchpad near the screen is possibly where the touchpad should always have been, that would do away with the typing issues.

Touchscreens work best on handheld devices, they don't work as well on laptops/desktops as I've already explained as the focus is taken from the natural position to the touching the screen. Windows 8.1 doesn't make a case for having a touchscreen on a laptop, it just makes the case that Microsoft haven't got things right yet. What you're saying is that because you have a touchscreen you are making a case for using it. Where as I'm typing on a laptop now that doesn't have a touchscreen and I have Windows 8.1 running on it. Had I paid £100 or so extra for a laptop that did have the facility or a cheaper touchscreen laptop that lacked power I wouldn't have gained anything productivity wise.

Remember you're paying for that touchscreen, so you're either paying more or sacrificing power, however you aren't gaining a significant amount of productivity usage from a laptop/desktop platform that uses a touchscreen. Whilst you personally may find a touchscreen more useful, you'll find that most people who buy a laptop with a touchscreen won't use the feature very often. There's always exceptions to the rule, you being one, but in general touchscreens aren't a necessity on a laptop platform.

1. Physical keyboard is surely better for typing normal letters but unless you're using a large desktop replacement laptop with dedicated number pad, you'd definitely prefer this when entering long numbers like phone numbers:
http://i.imgur.com/c9mSM47.png

2. You will have trouble searching for apps with non-latin names when you're using a latin language input method as default or vice versa. Also enabling the show apps view option means you have to click that tiny arrow for live tiles.

I agree with you on 3 & 4.

Anyways the OP is not wrong saying you need touchscreen to use Windows 8 PROPERLY. The UI and more and more new metro apps are designed for touchscreen. Using touchpad and keyboard is just not as efficient and pleasant. You might have trouble adapting to new technology but that's not the case for everyone. Besides, you're paying only £30 instead of £100 extra for the T100 with a detachable keyboard and better cpu.

Edited By: tomhl on Dec 03, 2013 13:03
#30
tomhl
fishmaster
tomhl
fishmaster
tomhl
zerospin
This or Asus T100?

Surely T100! That Intel cpu is much better than the AMD on this and it can be a true tablet. Also it's only a little bit more expensive.

http://cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Atom+Z3740+%40+1.33GHz&id=2059
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A4-1200+APU


fishmaster
yanzui
edwood
With this you are getting a 500 GB hard drive as well as Office 2013 included in the price.

The T100 has Office 2013 included as well.

Depends what you're after I suppose. The T100TA is more than a realistic proposition if you want the functionality and usability of a tablet with a keyboard with the full blown Windows and office included.

Storage options are a plenty these days so it wouldn't bother me that there isn't much on-board storage. It has a USB port and a micro card slot.

Most reviews say the Bay Trail processor more than holds its own and you'll get 8/9 hours out of the battery.

This isn't like a tablet, the keyboard is fixed to the screen. The OP is WRONG that you need a touchscreen for Windows 8. I've said all this stuff before anyway. Make your own minds up, however it's my opinion that for this form factor a touchscreen is a novelty. Touchscreens are much more useful for hand held devices.

Devices such as this where you have to move your hands away from the keyboard and touchpad to operate the touchscreen are less productive, since it's entirely possible to use Windows 8 using the touchpad, the touchscreen doesn't add anywhere near the functionality/productivity that you think it does. I've been slammed for saying it before but that doesn't make it any less true. There's always exceptions to any rule, but in general touchscreens are not needed on laptop form factors. So don't buy this because it has a touchscreen, buy it because it's powerful enough for your needs and you don't want to pay extra for Office 2013.

You probably haven't used a laptop with a touchscreen. Of course you can do everything in Windows 8 without a touchscreen but sometimes it's just much easier to do things with it. I have an Asus S200E and I have to say it's really helpful to have a touchscreen on a small laptop. Two examples here:
1. Typing numbers on the touchscreen keyboard with a phone layout can be much faster than the physical keyboard.
2. Accessing all apps in Start Menu takes only one swipe upwards versus looking for that tiny arrow to click with the touchpad.

There are many more situations when you just want to touch the screen instead of using the tiny cursor, especially in metro style apps. You can't say it's only useful for handhelds and not for laptops really.

I work for a company that buys and sells computer equipment, I've done this retail for 7 years, I know what works and doesn't work for the customer, like I said there's exceptions to every rule, but in general you don't need the touchscreen. I've used 100s of laptops with touchscreens. Do what I suggest below and you'll learn something :)

My suggestion - learn how to use the touchpad, it takes a couple of minutes to learn how to use Windows 8/8.1 with the touchpad, then you won't need the touchscreen. Two fingers in a vertical swipe up and down will scroll left and right, edge swipe gestures bring app manager and charms menu in to view, dead easy, makes more sense than a touchscreen. My tip on Windows 8 is to disable the "When I swipe in from left edge change the next open app" or words to that effect in settings, then it will bring out an app manager where you can right click and close apps easily, no need to vertical swipe down to close modern UI apps.



Unfortunately your suggestions are not very helpful. I guess everyone knows the two-finger gestures you mentioned unless 1) they don't use touchpad at all; 2) not clever enough; 3) the touchpad doesn't support multi-touch.
In fact some laptop brands, Asus for example, even develops their own enhanced touchpad software (ASUS Smart Gesture) to support more gestures including three-fingers gestures like swipe up to show and navigate running apps. That shows the current foreground app at the center of the screen with a X at top right corner to close it with only one click.
That is better than your second tip where only apps hidden in background are shown in the left apps bar, so you still have to use the swipe down from top gesture to close foreground app or to minimise/switch to another app before swipe from left edge > right click the app > click close.
Keep in mind this is not available for all touchpads. Besides, you still cannot solve my 2 problems in my earlier post without a touchscreen.

1. Using the keyboard is faster on a laptop than a touchscreen keyboard
2. Personally I never use that apps screen, I use the type to search which is faster. I never need to see all my apps on one screen. Windows 8.1 can also be set to show the All Apps screen instead of the modern interface.
3. Windows 8.1 doesn't have the best design, however it is the only popular system in the world that has tried to marry a desktop and touchscreen based UI together.
4. Laptop manufacturers are trying various different ideas such as the Acer R7 Hinge. Putting the touchpad near the screen is possibly where the touchpad should always have been, that would do away with the typing issues.

Touchscreens work best on handheld devices, they don't work as well on laptops/desktops as I've already explained as the focus is taken from the natural position to the touching the screen. Windows 8.1 doesn't make a case for having a touchscreen on a laptop, it just makes the case that Microsoft haven't got things right yet. What you're saying is that because you have a touchscreen you are making a case for using it. Where as I'm typing on a laptop now that doesn't have a touchscreen and I have Windows 8.1 running on it. Had I paid £100 or so extra for a laptop that did have the facility or a cheaper touchscreen laptop that lacked power I wouldn't have gained anything productivity wise.

Remember you're paying for that touchscreen, so you're either paying more or sacrificing power, however you aren't gaining a significant amount of productivity usage from a laptop/desktop platform that uses a touchscreen. Whilst you personally may find a touchscreen more useful, you'll find that most people who buy a laptop with a touchscreen won't use the feature very often. There's always exceptions to the rule, you being one, but in general touchscreens aren't a necessity on a laptop platform.

1. Physical keyboard is surely better for typing normal letters but unless you're using a large desktop replacement laptop with dedicated number pad, you'd definitely prefer this when entering long numbers like phone numbers:
http://i.imgur.com/c9mSM47.png

2. You will have trouble searching for apps with non-latin names when you're using a latin language input method as default or vice versa. Also enabling the show apps view option means you have to click that tiny arrow for live tiles.

I agree with you on 3 & 4.

Anyways the OP is not wrong saying you need touchscreen to use Windows 8 PROPERLY. The UI and more and more new metro apps are designed for touchscreen. Using touchpad and keyboard is just not as efficient and pleasant. You might have trouble adapting to new technology but that's not the case for everyone. Besides, you're paying only £30 instead of £100 extra for the T100 with a detachable keyboard and better cpu.

I agree on some of those points, however in those situations Windows 8 is better suited to a tablet etc, whichever way you spin it a touchscreen on a laptop just isn't the way to do things. If you need touch then you should be using a handheld device.

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