ASDA Plain & Self Raising Flour 1.5kg reduced to 67p @ Asda - HotUKDeals
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ASDA Plain & Self Raising Flour 1.5kg reduced to 67p @ Asda

£0.67 @ Asda
Good deal for home bakers to stock up your cupboards. Just be sure to use a good yeast... "Allinson dried active yeast" (yellow container) never worked well for us, so we switched to "Allinson eas… Read More
ibnMuhammad_ Avatar
2m, 2w agoFound 2 months, 2 weeks ago
Good deal for home bakers to stock up your cupboards.

Just be sure to use a good yeast...
"Allinson dried active yeast" (yellow container) never worked well for us, so we switched to "Allinson easy bake yeast" (green container) which has worked really well with pizza dough and bread so far.

Link is to plain flour, and Self Raising Flour here.
ibnMuhammad_ Avatar
2m, 2w agoFound 2 months, 2 weeks ago
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4 Likes #1
Well you wouldn't use either of these for bread-making. Go for the strong flour and you'll get a better result.
#2
Like Halloway says, a decent strong flour for bread. For the rest I use Smartprice which is only 45p:{
1 Like #3
Despite the name, dried active yeast does need to be activated before use. Add warm water (not hot); within a few minutes it will start to froth to the surface. At this point add to the flour with the other liquid.

Easy bake yeast can be mixed directly into the flour before adding the liquid.
1 Like #4
Agree with the remarks about strong flour for breadmaking but this is still a good price for plain and self raising. Thanks op, heat added.:)
#5
Not whole meal, lacks fibre
#6
sam_of_london
Not whole meal, lacks fibre

Try All Bran
#7
So you can make a lot of Dough for less Dough
#8
pcs7038
Despite the name, dried active yeast does need to be activated before use. Add warm water (not hot); within a few minutes it will start to froth to the surface. At this point add to the flour with the other liquid.
Easy bake yeast can be mixed directly into the flour before adding the liquid.

I thought yeast (bacteria) needs both water as well as food... and they use sugar / glucose as a food source?
And its the output of carbon dioxide which indicates its activated, right?
After which point, we add it to the flour, etc.

But making croissants is still painfully difficult in that it never seems to rise! :(
1 Like #9
Correct on all.

The difficulty with croissants is that you need the dough to be cool enough so that the butter doesn't melt and warm enough for the yeast to work. The rising time given in many recipes seem to assume a kitchens that is much warmer than the average domestic kitchen - which is also why they instruct you to put the dough in the fridge to rest.

Unless your house is particularly warm, it may be better not to rest the dough in the fridge. That way it doesn't cool to a temperature where the yeast slows right down.
#10
sam_of_london
Not whole meal, lacks fibre


Yawn!
#11
TheBiker
sam_of_london
Not whole meal, lacks fibre

Try All Bran


Yep, won't touch the sides.
1 Like #12
Halloway
Well you wouldn't use either of these for bread-making. Go for the strong flour and you'll get a better result.
I personally use a 50/50 strong plain mix. Works well for me (though, its mostly flat breads I make). I also use plain flour when making sourdough (the starter is rye flour) - about a third rye, 2 thirds plain.

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