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Asda pregnancy vitamins 30 tablets 10p instore.

£0.10 @ Asda
I went to asda to get some pregnacare vitamins that are in the mother and baby event and spotted these on the vitamin shelf for 10p. I compared the vitamins included and they are almost identical… Read More
cazi77 Avatar
6y, 8m agoFound 6 years, 8 months ago
I went to asda to get some pregnacare vitamins that are in the mother and baby event and spotted these on the vitamin shelf for 10p.

I compared the vitamins included and they are almost identical.

Will probobly be store specific but worth a quick look for 10p.

They also had rosehip extract and some busy mum energy boost tablets for the same price.
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cazi77 Avatar
6y, 8m agoFound 6 years, 8 months ago
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(34) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
My wife get these free each month anyway as her midwife says do she take them.
#2
That's an excellent price. Going to have a nosey and see if ours is doing them too. I've always used pregnacare (still breastfeeding) and haven't even seen their own brand :)
2 Likes #3
Boooooooolsheeeeettt, Anyone who believes this nonsense is of any value as an alternative to a normal healthy diet is seriously deluded and, frankly, deserves to waste their ten p 8). How the heck do you think the human race managed to evolve over millions of years without this cr*p?
8 Likes #4
Jeezeypeeps
Boooooooolsheeeeettt, Anyone who believes this nonsense is of any value as an alternative to a normal healthy diet is seriously deluded and, frankly, deserves to waste their ten p 8). How the heck do you think the human race managed to evolve over millions of years without this cr*p?


Women planning to become pregnant and who are pregnant really do get a lot from certain supplements such as folic acid which dramatically reduces the chances of deformities to the child such as spinabifida so I find your comment rude and unhelpful.
2 Likes #5
sickly sweet2 people like this
Jeezeypeeps
Boooooooolsheeeeettt, Anyone who believes this nonsense is of any value as an alternative to a normal healthy diet is seriously deluded and, frankly, deserves to waste their ten p 8). How the heck do you think the human race managed to evolve over millions of years without this cr*p?


Women planning to become pregnant and who are pregnant really do get a lot from certain supplements such as folic acid which dramatically reduces the chances of deformities to the child such as spinabifida so I find your comment rude and unhelpful.


It isnt unhelpful, he's right. Pregnant women are given folic acid suppliments, they do not need these multi supplioments, they are a con. At this price it's fine but if you look at the branded ones they are VERY expensive and then look at the amounts of vitamins and they are only really different from normal vitamin tablets in the level one one vitamin (they actually have less of that vitamin.

Total con.
#6
The trouble today is that most people are influenced by advertising and peer pressure into buying junk food, or prepackaged meals or snack foods which contain preservatives and other unnatural chemicals and are badly balanced. They probably do need these vitamins! But they will still be eating the junk food and absorbing the unnatural chemicals!
#7
jasee
The trouble today is that most people are influenced by advertising and peer pressure into buying junk food, or prepackaged meals or snack foods which contain preservatives and other unnatural chemicals and are badly balanced. They probably do need these vitamins! But they will still be eating the junk food and absorbing the unnatural chemicals!


Sadly, it is the people who eat junk food and have a poor diet who are most in need of vitamin supplements who won't bother. The people who do buy/take them are generally the 'worried well', who do already eat a balanced diet and don't actually need them.

Edited By: andyken on Oct 15, 2010 08:22: .
#8
If synthetic,it's garbage as most of these pills are, and toxic to the liver,this is how much they should cost .05p
3 Likes #9
To the poster who suggested pregnancy vitamins are not required because we have evolved so far without them - just because some people survived to reproduce doesn't mean improvements to health couldn't be made. Do you suggest we go back to the times of poor health and a high infant mortality rate? Scientific studies have shown that certain supplements are beneficial to the developing foetus, regardless of the mother's diet. For example, about half of people in the UK are deficient in vitamin D due to insufficient sunlight in this country- this can lead to a soft skull in the newborn, and prenatal rickets. Would you like to see a resurgence in conditions like this?
4 Likes #10
Yeah, proven scientific studies are all rubbish, lets go back to living till were 50 then dying from some horrible disease.
1 Like #11
thescientist - Oct 15, 2010 08:24
To the poster who suggested pregnancy vitamins are not required.


So as a scientist can you point me to some evidence that these are worth taking, because I thought the only evidence was for folic acid (which as pointed out above is free on the NHS)?

Likewise Twist - where are the proven scientific studies for this product?

Edited By: inicholson on Oct 15, 2010 08:36: Twist
#12
Folic acid is the main thing thats important in these, I wasnt arguing you couldnt get it free. I was making a point that when some people say "How the heck do you think the human race managed to evolve over millions of years without this cr*p". We do actually need some help to survive and because of all this cr*p the human race has managed to pretty much double its life expectancy!

Sure some moron once said: Penicillin, what a load of cr*p!

If you want to read up on the benefits of various vitamins during pregnancy use google.
#13
Liquid or gel capsules normally have less fillers. At least you won't turn into a cake eating these ;D
1 Like #14
I really only wanted to help people that may be interested in this deal. I know it won't be for everyone but it really isnt worth arguing about.
#15
inicholson
thescientist - Oct 15, 2010 08:24To the poster who suggested pregnancy vitamins are not required.
So as a scientist can you point me to some evidence that these are worth taking, because I thought the only evidence was for folic acid (which as pointed out above is free on the NHS)?Likewise Twist - where are the proven scientific studies for this product?

I don't know what is in this product, but I do know that certain supplements are beneficial during pregnancy. With regards to vitamin D, The Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy (COMA) recommend that all pregnant and breastfeeding women should take a daily supplement of 10 µg vitamin D in order to ensure their own requirement for vitamin D is met and to build adequate fetal stores for early infancy. You can read the evidence for this in the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN)'Update on Vitamin D' 2007 report. The SACN is an advisory Committee of independent experts that provides advice to the Food Standards Agency and Department of Health as well as other government agencies and Departments. As you have mentioned, the evidence for folic acid reducing the likelihood of neural tube defects has been widely known for sometime, but many people are unaware of the advice to supplement vitamin D. The NHS say "It is best to get vitamins and minerals from the food you eat, but when you are pregnant you will need some supplements as well". You can read their advice about vitamin supplementation during pregnancy here: http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/pregnancycareplanner/pages/Vitaminsmineralsdiets.aspx


Edited By: thescientist on Oct 15, 2010 09:46: typo
#16
cazi77
I really only wanted to help people that may be interested in this deal. I know it won't be for everyone but it really isnt worth arguing about.


Al Qaeda will be getting involved next!!
#17
Nice to see a typical Asda mum in the picture. (Apart from the fact she's not drunk, smoking and lying in a gutter **** on Lambrini it's spot on)
1 Like #18
londislagerhound
Nice to see a typical Asda mum in the picture. (Apart from the fact she's not drunk, smoking and lying in a gutter **** on Lambrini it's spot on)


Yeah at least they got the beer belly right.
#19
lol - got caught out by only skim reading the title

Asda pregnacy for 10p? WTF? :P
#20
andyken
cazi77
I really only wanted to help people that may be interested in this deal. I know it won't be for everyone but it really isnt worth arguing about.


Al Qaeda will be getting involved next!!


Well I wasn't going to mention them, but if it wasn't for them, the Asda mums, when they weren't drinking like fish*, wouldn't have to provide cannon fodder for Al Qaeda

*This explains why it's the only supermarket round here with a fleet of Taxis outside

Edited By: jasee on Oct 15, 2010 14:13: update
#21
thescientist

I don't know what is in this product, but I do know that certain supplements are beneficial during pregnancy. With regards to vitamin D, The Committee on Medical Aspects of Food and Nutrition Policy (COMA) recommend that all pregnant and breastfeeding women should take a daily supplement of 10 µg vitamin D in order to ensure their own requirement for vitamin D is met and to build adequate fetal stores for early infancy. You can read the evidence for this in the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN)'Update on Vitamin D' 2007 report. The SACN is an advisory Committee of independent experts that provides advice to the Food Standards Agency and Department of Health as well as other government agencies and Departments. As you have mentioned, the evidence for folic acid reducing the likelihood of neural tube defects has been widely known for sometime, but many people are unaware of the advice to supplement vitamin D. The NHS say "It is best to get vitamins and minerals from the food you eat, but when you are pregnant you will need some supplements as well". You can read their advice about vitamin supplementation during pregnancy here: http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/pregnancycareplanner/pages/Vitaminsmineralsdiets.aspx


The trouble is all these 'august bodies' are liable to change their minds at the drop of a hat, look at the controversy over the dropping of school milk: is milk good for young children or not? and the same for soya milk as a substitute before it. Scientists simply (still) don't know or there are too many powerful influences from industry. Smoking is a good example
#22
These are amazing value, Heat added!!! Not just for pregancy as it contains vitamins which are beinifical for all people, been taking these myself for a few years!!! Gunna stock up!!!
#23
I got a few in my local today so thanks OP.
banned#24
vitamin A has no benefit:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20927743

the evidence for vitamin D is patchy but there may be something to it:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20194238
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20629479
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20832734

vitamins C and E do sod all
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20733448

multivitamins give your baby AIDS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739447
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739426

If you're this woman I would recommend vitamin A supplements:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929009/?tool=pubmed

If you're not that women then i would say this product is an out-and-out con.
#25
got the last pack in my local down to 5p the femibion energetic mum down to 10p
2 Likes #26
Mascherano
vitamin A has no benefit:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20927743


the evidence for vitamin D is patchy but there may be something to it:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20194238

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20629479

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20832734


vitamins C and E do sod all
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20733448


multivitamins give your baby AIDS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739447

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20739426


If you're this woman I would recommend vitamin A supplements:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929009/?tool=pubmed


If you're not that women then i would say this product is an out-and-out con.


That's a very random collection of studies that are not very representative of the research as a whole. And to say that vitamins give your baby AIDS is a ridiculous suggestion, since those studies were about the transmission of HIV from mother to child. If you don't have HIV (as applies to most of us) this isn't an issue!! I agree that many vitamin supplements are a waste of time, and I also think that many are harmful to otherwise healthy adults. I think there should be more regulation around these things, since many people blindly take them thinking they will provide benefits, when many do not. Some studies have shown that certain high dose supplements can be damaging to health and increase mortality. Vitamins can behave differently out of the context of the foods from which they are derived. However, as stated previously, there is clear evidence to support the recommendations for taking folic acid and vitamin D. The primary reason for taking vitamin D is to ensure your baby's bones are formed properly.

With regards to vitamin A - high doses of this can be harmful to an unborn child. Therefore people taking standard supplements need to be careful that they do not contain high levels of vitamin A. This is where pregnancy specific supplements can be useful - since they balance the nutrients to the levels specifically recommended for pregnant women.



Edited By: thescientist on Oct 15, 2010 21:52: typo
1 Like #27
I took supplements all through my first pregnancy and when breast feeding for 2 years. My daughter is now 3, she is rarely ill!! and is gorgeous :-) Great deal thanks OP, heat added from me. I am now expecting again and taking supplements!

Edited By: Amberk on Oct 15, 2010 22:28: to add a comment
banned#28
thescientist1 person likes this

With regards to vitamin A - high doses of this can be harmful to an unborn child. Therefore people taking standard supplements need to be careful that they do not contain high levels of vitamin A. This is where pregnancy specific supplements can be useful - since they balance the nutrients to the levels specifically recommended for pregnant women.

So you, as a scientist, recommend pregnacare vitamin supplements? That puts you in some extreme company.
No-one can dispute the benefits of folic acid but the jury is still out on vitamin D. Not quite as clear cut as you make out.
Dont you think eating fruit and veg would be better?
banned#29
jasee

The trouble is all these 'august bodies' are liable to change their minds at the drop of a hat, look at the controversy over the dropping of school milk: is milk good for young children or not? and the same for soya milk as a substitute before it. Scientists simply (still) don't know or there are too many powerful influences from industry. Smoking is a good example

Scientists can advise government agencies and present the best current evidence but the government can, and often do, choose to ignore that advice.
You're right that scientists dont know. At best they will form a consensus around a body of reliable evidence; this is far from knowing if something is true. But to suggest that scientists 'change their minds at the drop of a hat' or that this is a weakness of the scientific method is wrong- can you tell me a better alternative?
How would you find out if something is true or not? Spend years studying it- thats what scientists do.
2 Likes #30
Mascherano
thescientist1 person likes this

With regards to vitamin A - high doses of this can be harmful to an unborn child. Therefore people taking standard supplements need to be careful that they do not contain high levels of vitamin A. This is where pregnancy specific supplements can be useful - since they balance the nutrients to the levels specifically recommended for pregnant women.

So you, as a scientist, recommend pregnacare vitamin supplements? That puts you in some extreme company.
No-one can dispute the benefits of folic acid but the jury is still out on vitamin D. Not quite as clear cut as you make out.
Dont you think eating fruit and veg would be better?


I disagree that the jury is still out on vitamin D. Vitamin D supplements are recommended for pregnant women by highly-regarded scientists in the field of vitamin D research. As such, the NHS recommend that women take vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. As for eating fruit and veg instead, this would do no good, since these contain absolutely no vitamin D. Even a healthy diet can be low in vitamin D, hence many vitamin D scientists are lobbying to get the vitamin added to milk, which is what happens in the US and in many other countries. As for Pregnacare, I do not know exactly what is in it (having not seen the product myself) so I cannot recommend it specifically. However, I believe that many women would benefit from taking this, rather than taking nothing, since I believe that at least some of the nutrients will be beneficial. Also since it is specifically designed for pregnant women, it will be safer for the baby than standard multivitamin tablets.
banned 1 Like #31
thescientist

I disagree that the jury is still out on vitamin D. Vitamin D supplements are recommended for pregnant women by highly-regarded scientists in the field of vitamin D research. As such, the NHS recommend that women take vitamin D supplements during pregnancy. As for eating fruit and veg instead, this would do no good, since these contain absolutely no vitamin D. Even a healthy diet can be low in vitamin D, hence many vitamin D scientists are lobbying to get the vitamin added to milk, which is what happens in the US and in many other countries. As for Pregnacare, I do not know exactly what is in it (having not seen the product myself) so I cannot recommend it specifically. However, I believe that many women would benefit from taking this, rather than taking nothing, since I believe that at least some of the nutrients will be beneficial. Also since it is specifically designed for pregnant women, it will be safer for the baby than standard multivitamin tablets.

Good point, so is the general population in UK Vitamin D deficient or is it just sub-groups eg preganant women? There's something very unsettling about the whole pro-Vitamin D crusade that my immediate reaction is scepticism. You seem distincly even-minded about the subject so I'm willing to defer to your more-informed opinion.
If you can be bothered can you point me in the direction of some good vitamin D research? I enjoy the debate by the way and hope I havent come accross badly.
#32
Amberk
I took supplements all through my first pregnancy and when breast feeding for 2 years. My daughter is now 3, she is rarely ill!! and is gorgeous :-)


That's just the kind of idiotic illogical nonsense that these magic-potion peddlers rely on. Guess what, today I went out with a hat on and didn't get run over in the street; therefore hats prevent road accidents! Go figure.....X)
#33
Jeezeypeeps
Amberk
I took supplements all through my first pregnancy and when breast feeding for 2 years. My daughter is now 3, she is rarely ill!! and is gorgeous :-)


That's just the kind of idiotic illogical nonsense that these magic-potion peddlers rely on. Guess what, today I went out with a hat on and didn't get run over in the street; therefore hats prevent road accidents! Go figure.....X)


I was not for one minute referring to supplements preventing illness etc. in baby's/children, just stating that they did not do my daughter or myself any harm! Don't knock it until you have tried it. Neither am I idiotic or illogical X)
1 Like #34
Amberk
Jeezeypeeps
Amberk
I took supplements all through my first pregnancy and when breast feeding for 2 years. My daughter is now 3, she is rarely ill!! and is gorgeous :-)


That's just the kind of idiotic illogical nonsense that these magic-potion peddlers rely on. Guess what, today I went out with a hat on and didn't get run over in the street; therefore hats prevent road accidents! Go figure.....X)


I was not for one minute referring to supplements preventing illness etc. in baby's/children, just stating that they did not do my daughter or myself any harm! Don't knock it until you have tried it. Neither am I idiotic or illogical X)


You're not making any sense yet I'm sorry to say. First you said you took supplement and you're daughter is now very healthy; now you say the supplements didn't help make her healthy but "didn't do her any harm". In either case, you have absolutely no evidence linking any of your statements , even if it is possible to make any logical sense out of them (which I very much doubt).

I'd be happy to take your advice refrain from knocking them 'til I've tried them. What sort of signs of success should I be looking out for? Based on your 'evidence', presumably still being alive after taking them would be a positive outcome?

Good try at digging yourself out of a hole though :D

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