Asrock P67 Pro3 P67 Socket 1155 'Sandybridge' 8 Channel Audio ATX Motherboard £86.84 Ebuyer - HotUKDeals
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Asrock P67 Pro3 P67 Socket 1155 'Sandybridge' 8 Channel Audio ATX Motherboard £86.84 Ebuyer

£86.84 @ Ebuyer
Would go well with http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/intel-core-i7-2600k-sandy-bridge-oem-unlocked-socket-1155-sandy-bridge-quad-core/860393 Product Description * ASRock DuraCap (2.5 x lon… Read More
Hanktank Avatar
6y, 5m agoFound 6 years, 5 months ago
Would go well with http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/intel-core-i7-2600k-sandy-bridge-oem-unlocked-socket-1155-sandy-bridge-quad-core/860393

Product Description

* ASRock DuraCap (2.5 x longer life time), 100% Japan-made high-quality Conductive Polymer Capacitors
* Supports Intel® K-Series unlocked CPU
* Supports Dual Channel DDR3 2133(OC)
* 2 x USB 3.0 ports, 2 x SATA3 connectors, 1 x eSATA3 connector
* Dr. Debug, Smart Swith Design: Power/Reset/Clear CMOS Switch with LED
* Supports ASRock Extreme Tuning Utility (AXTU), Instant Boot, Instant Flash, Good Night LED, Multi-Speed Fan Control, AIWI, APP Charger, SmartView
* Combo Cooler Option (C.C.O.)
* 7.1 CH HD Audio with Content Protection (Realtek ALC892 Audio Codec), Premium Blu-ray audio support
* ErP/EuP Ready


Specification
CPU
Supports 2nd Generation Intel® Core™ i7 / i5 / i3 in LGA1155 Package
Advanced V8 + 2 Power Phase Design
Supports Intel® Turbo Boost 2.0 Technology
Supports Intel® K-Series unlocked CPU
Supports Hyper-Threading Technology

Chipset - Intel® P67

Memory
Dual Channel DDR3 memory technology
4 x DDR3 DIMM slots
Supports DDR3 2133(OC)/1866(OC)/1600/1333/1066 non-ECC, un-buffered memory
Max. capacity of system memory: 32GB*
Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP)

BIOS
64Mb AMI UEFI Legal BIOS with GUI support
Supports "Plug and Play"
ACPI 1.1 Compliance Wake Up Events
Supports jumperfree
SMBIOS 2.3.1 Support
DRAM, PCH, CPU PLL, VTT, VCCSA Voltage Multi-adjustment

Audio, Video and Networking

Audio
7.1 CH HD Audio with Content Protection (Realtek ALC892 Audio Codec)
Premium Blu-ray audio support
LAN
PCIE x1 Gigabit LAN 10/100/1000 Mb/s
Realtek RTL8111E
Supports Wake-On-LAN
Supports LAN Cable Detection
Supports Energy Efficient Ethernet 802.3az

Expansion / Connectivity
Slots
1 x PCI Express 2.0 x16 slot (blue @ x16 mode)
3 x PCI Express 2.0 x1 slots
3 x PCI slots
SATA3 - 2 x SATA3 6.0 Gb/s connectors, support RAID (RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 10, RAID 5 and Intel® Rapid Storage), NCQ, AHCI and "Hot Plug" functions (SATA3_1 connector is shared with eSATA3 port)
USB 3.0 - 2 x USB 3.0 ports by Etron EJ168A, support USB 1.0/2.0/3.0 up to 5Gb/s
Connector - 4 x SATA2 3.0 Gb/s connectors, support RAID (RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 10, RAID 5 and Intel® Rapid Storage),

NCQ, AHCI and Hot Plug functions
2 x SATA3 6.0 Gb/s connectors
1 x Floppy connector
1 x IR header
1 x COM port header
1 x HDMI_SPDIF header
1 x Power LED header

CPU/Chassis/Power FAN connector
24 pin ATX power connector
8 pin 12V power connector
Front panel audio connector
3 x USB 2.0 headers (support 6 USB 2.0 ports)
1 x Dr. Debug with LED

Rear Panel I/O I/O Panel
1 x PS/2 Mouse Port
1 x PS/2 Keyboard Port
1 x Coaxial SPDIF Out Port
1 x Optical SPDIF Out Port
6 x Ready-to-Use USB 2.0 Ports
1 x eSATA3 Connector
2 x Ready-to-Use USB 3.0 Ports
1 x RJ-45 LAN Port with LED (ACT/LINK LED and SPEED LED)
1 x Clear CMOS Switch with LED
HD Audio Jack: Side Speaker / Rear Speaker / Central / Bass / Line in / Front Speaker / Microphone

Other Features / Miscellaneous
ASRock Extreme Tuning Utility (AXTU)
Instant Boot
ASRock Instant Flash
ASRock AIWI
ASRock APP Charger
SmartView
Hybrid Booster:
CPU Frequency Stepless Control
ASRock U-COP
Boot Failure Guard (B.F.G.)
Combo Cooler Option (C.C.O.)
Good Night LED

Smart Switch
1 x Power Switch with LED
1 x Reset Switch with LED
1 x Clear CMOS Switch with LED
Support CD - Drivers, Utilities, AntiVirus Software (Trial Version), ASRock Software Suite (CyberLink DVD Suite - OEM and Trial; Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi MB - Trial)

Accessories
Quick Installation Guide, Support CD, I/O Shield
2 x SATA Data Cables (optional)
Hardware Monitor
CPU Temperature Sensing
Chassis Temperature Sensing
CPU/Chassis/Power Fan Tachometer
CPU/Chassis Quiet Fan (Allow Chassis Fan Speed Auto-Adjust by CPU or MB Temperature)
CPU/Chassis Fan Multi-Speed Control
Voltage Monitoring: +12V, +5V, +3.3V, CPU Vcore

Form Factor
ATX Form Factor: 12.0-in x 9.6-in, 30.5 cm x 24.4 cm
All Solid Capacitor design (100% Japan-made high-quality Conductive Polymer Capacitors)
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All Comments

(40) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#2


Im running 2600k and there is no DRM? DRM was a feature that could f been used in the budget h67 motherboards, its not being used there anyway, take a look at the link below

http://www.afterdawn.com/news/article.cfm/2011/01/07/intel_insists_insider_in_sandy_bridge_is_not_drm

Edited By: Hanktank on Jan 24, 2011 23:19
#3
@ Hanktank
from your link - "Insider gives PCs the level of trust that the studio needs to make their content available. In the past they were very leery of streaming content. It's not a DRM technology at all," said Josh Newman, graphics marketing director at Intel.
i.e. It is DRM handing control of what you can do on your computer to Hollywood and the likes.
#4
So if I'm not bothered about streaming live video from Warner and others, is it going to bother me? (If only my broadband was fast enough to even consider it.)

Or do I just go with the performance enhancement of Sandy Bridge and not worry about the DRM?
3 Likes #5
iandhind - Jan 25, 2011 00:01
So if I'm not bothered about streaming live video from Warner and others, is it going to bother me? (If only my broadband was fast enough to even consider it.)
Or do I just go with the performance enhancement of Sandy Bridge and not worry about the DRM?
It's up to you. Just be aware of the implications of getting Sandybridge before you decide. If you don’t mind complete strangers having some control over what you can do with your own PC then go ahead. Personally I wouldn’t touch Sandybridge with a bargepole as I want to decide for myself what I do with my computer.
#6


Have you actually bothered to read any of those links you've posted? They all say the same thing, DRM built in to allow movie studios to legally stream films to users of sandy bridge. It has no affect on anything else you do with the PC and nobody is in control of your PC. It's for legally streaming movies, that's all.
2 Likes #7
Jesus I hate it when people don't understand technical data and misinterpret it to help confuse the masses. Sandy Bridge CPU's are fine, I can't be bothered to continue to explain why but posts like JunkMails make me sigh out loud.



Edited By: mumjit on Jan 25, 2011 00:47
1 Like #8
I thought he'd sell me timeshare too.. ignore the ignorance sandy bridge works fine for me lol
#9
Cheers for that had me a little concerned for a fraction of a sec there, getting an i5 2500k, which would you say would be a good board to go with or this processor, also adding a Nvidia GeForce GTX 570, cheers everyone.
#10
I wouldn't touch AsRock after my last motherboard by them.
3 Likes #11
From another source -

Intel's New Chip Technology is building DRM into the Sandy Bridge!

Bad news Indeed
Quote:
Sandy Bridge, the latest line of Intel's Core i series CPUs, will reportedly feature faster speeds, better integrated graphics, lower power consumption and a DRM scheme to protect the content of motion picture studios.
Quote:
Intel will reportedly build a hardware security layer into the processors to prevent people from copying streaming videos.
Quote:
The technology it'll use is apparently called "Insider." It will incorporate an end-to-end protection layer and a management feature to unlock high-definition movies downloaded from online streaming services or off DVDs.
Quote:
"These are features built into the hardware, so if you're a Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) or a Warner Bros., you can program a time clock into a movie or code it so it's good for only a certain number of days after the consumer downloads it," In-Stat's McGregor pointed out. "It's all related to DRM."
Quote:
DRM, or digital rights management, has long been a bone of contention between consumers and content providers, mainly motion picture studios and recording companies. The Recording Industry Association of America spent more than US$16 million on legal fees in 2008 alone to sue individuals for downloading music illegally, according to its tax returns, as published on P2Pnet.
Quote:
Intel's apparently working with more studios to get their content. Further, it reportedly will include the "Insider" feature in lower-end consumer processors.
Source >http://www.technewsworld.com/story/Inte ... 1294213857

Let your friends know that the hardware MFG's have not learned anything from the Sony Debacle and that RIAA and MPAA are again not allowing the customer to back up even the media they buy as allowed by many laws. I do hope at least most people are aware of how many pieces of the whole pie RIAA and MPAA, are truly involved in and how much money their spending ....Who's pockets are they trying to fill? The politicians and government officials are just a few. Be forewarned.

If that isn't enough to keep you away from Sandy Bridge then good luck to you.
#12
You're still not getting it are you? All it's doing, as that article you've quoted clearly says is allow these companies to stream movies and people won't be able to rip/copy them for piracy reasons.
1 Like #13
Weenie Beenie
You're still not getting it are you? All it's doing, as that article you've quoted clearly says is allow these companies to stream movies and people won't be able to rip/copy them for piracy reasons.

I get it and I don't like it.
#14
Yeh, to be honest i'm not keen on this either. Let's not be over dramatic, this incarnation of sandy bridge does very little harm....but what about when they start controlling a litte bit more, and a little bit more. Isn't it a very clever way to finally stop piracy? At processor level, this is a little bit too much control for my liking. So long as AMD don't start doing this, we should be ok. If they all agree (Amd, intel, arm)...it could change the internet as we know it! Like i said...not to be too dramatic.

*Intense music...inception style*
2 Likes #15
Skynet is alive!
1 Like #16
Rainbow Dave
I wouldn't touch AsRock after my last motherboard by them.


Me either they are a budget board and for not that much more you can get a Gigabyte or Asus and before someone says Asrock/Asus dont bother they are like night and day in terms of quality, If you plan on getting the most out of your new sandybridge with a unlocked multiplier you are way better getting a decent board as both Asus and Gigabyte can overclock a 2500k to 4.8ghz on air without breaking a sweat something this board wont do.
#17


YAWN - you do realise this isn't the first TPM tacked onto an Intel system don't you? FWIW they never used it to worry about piracy back then and they won't now., storm in a teacup

Edited By: Rich44 on Jan 25, 2011 06:37: ...
1 Like #18
JunkMail
iandhind - Jan 25, 2011 00:01
So if I'm not bothered about streaming live video from Warner and others, is it going to bother me? (If only my broadband was fast enough to even consider it.)
Or do I just go with the performance enhancement of Sandy Bridge and not worry about the DRM?

It's up to you. Just be aware of the implications of getting Sandybridge before you decide. If you don’t mind complete strangers having some control over what you can do with your own PC then go ahead. Personally I wouldn’t touch Sandybridge with a bargepole as I want to decide for myself what I do with my computer.


I bet that tinfoil hat gets REALLY uncomfortable sometimes doesn't it
#19
lol at thread

Good price for good product.

If it's a buying consideration, then beware lack of legacy ports on this mainboard for eg. IDE, parallel. Though there is COM and FDD headers.

Purchased mine from Micro Direct as they had 2500K in stock. Check the memory support list at Asrock for suitable memory. The Kingston Value Ram 2x2GB from them works just fine. Made a great upgrade for an ageing Core2Duo system.
1 Like #20
dcx_badass
JunkMail
Think carefully before you touch Sandybridge and be aware of just what you are letting yourself into.-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/71568.html?wlc=1295910030-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://ces2011.techradar.com/2011/01/intels-sandy-bridge-chip-to-offer-built-in-drm/-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.center.hu/en/knowledge/news/intel_sandy_bridges_insid.html-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/965470-intels-sandy-bridge-sucks-up-to-hollywood-with-drm/-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/1934536/intels-sandy-bridge-sucks-hollywood-drm-[url=" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.zdnet.co.uk/blogs/jacks-blog-10017212/ces-2011-intels-sandy-bridge-chips-with-drm-10021430/and many, many more.Try looking for Sandybridge DRM on scroogle.com

You have no idea what you are talking about, it does not control files on your computer, it does not control what you watch or download, all it does is encrypts content been streamed from certain online services, it is basically HDCP but applied to streaming content, only affects the transfer and nothing else.


I agree, I wouldn't comment on the insider feature unless you know what you're talking about, over the years CPU's have gone from literally being processors, to carrying their own memory, to now on the sandybridge platform having on-board hd graphics (yes really) and insider functionality, which in my opinion will be beneficial as it doesn't harm any user at all, it just makes the studios more comfortable to stream content.

However, if you're going to invest in a £200+ CPU i'd probably go for a better board than an Asrock... only speaking from personal experience.
#21
Rainbow Dave
I wouldn't touch AsRock after my last motherboard by them.


agreed, they're called ass-rock for a reason....
#22
Weenie Beenie - Jan 25, 2011 02:34
You're still not getting it are you? All it's doing, as that article you've quoted clearly says is allow these companies to stream movies and people won't be able to rip/copy them for piracy reasons.
Thank you. You couldn’t have made the point that I have been making more clear. If you don’t care about having the freedom to be able to use your computer as you choose then it doesn’t matter but, if you don’t want DRM on your computer then don’t touch Sandy Bridge. That’s all there is to it. Just be aware of the issue before you take the plunge.
1 Like #23
JunkMail
Weenie Beenie - Jan 25, 2011 02:34
You're still not getting it are you? All it's doing, as that article you've quoted clearly says is allow these companies to stream movies and people won't be able to rip/copy them for piracy reasons.

Thank you. You couldn’t have made the point that I have been making more clear. If you don’t care about having the freedom to be able to use your computer as you choose then it doesn’t matter but, if you don’t want DRM on your computer then don’t touch Sandy Bridge. That’s all there is to it. Just be aware of the issue before you take the plunge.


You still don't get it. If you don't have a processor that supports this, you won't be able to to view that content. In the same way that if you don't have a HDCP compatible monitor you cant view blu-rays. I understand you might dislike that this DRM is being added to hardware but no-one is controlling your computer by adding this feature, they are just enabling content. Surely the people who DONT have this processor should be the annoyed ones because they are being excluded from content.
#24
sej7278
Rainbow Dave
I wouldn't touch AsRock after my last motherboard by them.
agreed, they're called ass-rock for a reason....

Have asrock gone done the pan in recent years? i always used them in the past without any problems.
1 Like #25
jamesdew
You still don't get it. If you don't have a processor that supports this, you won't be able to to view that content. In the same way that if you don't have a HDCP compatible monitor you cant view blu-rays. I understand you might dislike that this DRM is being added to hardware but no-one is controlling your computer by adding this feature, they are just enabling content. Surely the people who DONT have this processor should be the annoyed ones because they are being excluded from content.
I most certainly do get it. DRM allows other people to control how you can use your computer to use their content.
Do either you jamesdew or Weenie Beenie work for the entertainment industry or Intel? You are doing your very best to talk down what is a major issue for many people. You are trivialising the serious implications of what it means to have DRM built into computers. Get people to accept a little bit of DRM at first and slip in a tiny bit more with each new chip and before you know it all content can be controlled. That’s what will happen if it becomes acceptable to have DRM built into chips. The way to defeat it is not to buy their DRM-enabled products which is why I feel it very important to warn people about it.
#26
JunkMail
jamesdew
You still don't get it. If you don't have a processor that supports this, you won't be able to to view that content. In the same way that if you don't have a HDCP compatible monitor you cant view blu-rays. I understand you might dislike that this DRM is being added to hardware but no-one is controlling your computer by adding this feature, they are just enabling content. Surely the people who DONT have this processor should be the annoyed ones because they are being excluded from content.

I most certainly do get it. DRM allows other people to control how you can use your computer to use their content.
Do either you jamesdew or Weenie Beenie work for the entertainment industry or Intel? You are doing your very best to talk down what is a major issue for many people. You are trivialising the serious implications of what it means to have DRM built into computers. Get people to accept a little bit of DRM at first and slip in a tiny bit more with each new chip and before you know it all content can be controlled. That’s what will happen if it becomes acceptable to have DRM built into chips. The way to defeat it is not to buy their DRM-enabled products which is why I feel it very important to warn people about it.


Grr, stop not addressing our point. I also don't want DRM in hardware, however you keep saying things like "freedom to be able to use your computer as you choose". Adding this technology to your processor does not prevent you from viewing any content that you could on another processor. It is this suggestion you are making that I have issue with.

Your latest post was the first indication that you don't want to buy this processor as a form of protest, I would support that notion. You did not say that before. Your earlier posts suggested that this technology controlled what you can and cannot play. It does not do that, it allows you to play DRM content which you cant play without a processor that supports this.

There is no negative impact to the individual by buying a processor with this technology. So, as in your first post what exactly are we "getting ourselves into"

Edited By: jamesdew on Jan 25, 2011 13:26
#27
!!!NERRRRRD FIGHT!!!
#28
SHAME it has 1 x PCI Express 2.0 x16 slot (blue @ x16 mode)
#29
tehdood
lol at thread

Good price for good product.

If it's a buying consideration, then beware lack of legacy ports on this mainboard for eg. IDE, parallel. Though there is COM and FDD headers.


IDE I get, many people have old drives that support it.

Parallel hasn't been standard for years, and isn't used for new stuff.

If you need it that badly there are plenty of PCI cards for cheap.

FDD and Serial, ROFL, no seriously, Floppy's are pretty much dead. Serial has engineering uses but outside of that it's pointless.
#30
JunkMail
jamesdew
You still don't get it. If you don't have a processor that supports this, you won't be able to to view that content. In the same way that if you don't have a HDCP compatible monitor you cant view blu-rays. I understand you might dislike that this DRM is being added to hardware but no-one is controlling your computer by adding this feature, they are just enabling content. Surely the people who DONT have this processor should be the annoyed ones because they are being excluded from content.

I most certainly do get it. DRM allows other people to control how you can use your computer to use their content.
Do either you jamesdew or Weenie Beenie work for the entertainment industry or Intel? You are doing your very best to talk down what is a major issue for many people. You are trivialising the serious implications of what it means to have DRM built into computers. Get people to accept a little bit of DRM at first and slip in a tiny bit more with each new chip and before you know it all content can be controlled. That’s what will happen if it becomes acceptable to have DRM built into chips. The way to defeat it is not to buy their DRM-enabled products which is why I feel it very important to warn people about it.


Let me put it simply.

With this DRM you can do anything you like with your computer. You can download pirated movies, you can access illegal websites, you can copy DVDs and put them on the internet, anything.

With this DRM movie studios can stream movies to users without the risk that those users will be able to copy them and pirate them. But still, nobody is forcing you to use this paid streaming service. If you still want to stream or download movies illegally, you can.

You say this is the 'first step' to more controlling DRM but that isn't happening yet is it? Sure, come back and complain if chips have built in DRM that won't let you download anything you like, but for now you're just worrying about something that doesn't even have to affect you.
#31
JunkMail
iandhind - Jan 25, 2011 00:01
So if I'm not bothered about streaming live video from Warner and others, is it going to bother me? (If only my broadband was fast enough to even consider it.)
Or do I just go with the performance enhancement of Sandy Bridge and not worry about the DRM?

It's up to you. Just be aware of the implications of getting Sandybridge before you decide. If you don’t mind complete strangers having some control over what you can do with your own PC then go ahead. Personally I wouldn’t touch Sandybridge with a bargepole as I want to decide for myself what I do with my computer.


Honestly I think you just read what you wanted to in the article.

By definition Rental movies are only supposed to be available to you temporarily? What is wrong with enforcing that? If you don't like the system don't rent movies, that way you'll never know the DRM is there.
#32
Weenie Beenie
JunkMail
jamesdew
You still don't get it. If you don't have a processor that supports this, you won't be able to to view that content. In the same way that if you don't have a HDCP compatible monitor you cant view blu-rays. I understand you might dislike that this DRM is being added to hardware but no-one is controlling your computer by adding this feature, they are just enabling content. Surely the people who DONT have this processor should be the annoyed ones because they are being excluded from content.
I most certainly do get it. DRM allows other people to control how you can use your computer to use their content.
Do either you jamesdew or Weenie Beenie work for the entertainment industry or Intel? You are doing your very best to talk down what is a major issue for many people. You are trivialising the serious implications of what it means to have DRM built into computers. Get people to accept a little bit of DRM at first and slip in a tiny bit more with each new chip and before you know it all content can be controlled. That’s what will happen if it becomes acceptable to have DRM built into chips. The way to defeat it is not to buy their DRM-enabled products which is why I feel it very important to warn people about it.

Let me put it simply.

With this DRM you can do anything you like with your computer. You can download pirated movies, you can access illegal websites, you can copy DVDs and put them on the internet, anything.

With this DRM movie studios can stream movies to users without the risk that those users will be able to copy them and pirate them. But still, nobody is forcing you to use this paid streaming service. If you still want to stream or download movies illegally, you can.

You say this is the 'first step' to more controlling DRM but that isn't happening yet is it? Sure, come back and complain if chips have built in DRM that won't let you download anything you like, but for now you're just worrying about something that doesn't even have to affect you.

Actually this DRM has the capacity, if implemented, to stop you copying legitimately owned future DVD's and BlueRay discs in hardware, and not just rented streaming media.

DRM is plain bad unless of course you have a lovely summer house overlooking Malibu beach and work for Universal City Studios.
#33
toaster - Jan 25, 2011 20:16
Actually this DRM has the capacity, if implemented, to stop you copying legitimately owned future DVD's and BlueRay discs in hardware, and not just rented streaming media.

DRM is plain bad unless of course you have a lovely summer house overlooking Malibu beach and work for Universal City Studios.
Exactly! We should boycott any computer chips with DRM no matter how trivial it may seem. If we don’t it will get much worse.
#34
Wow im amazed at how ill informed people are, DRM is not enabled on the p67 motherboard could will only affect the h67 motherboard in certain scenario and isn't a used feature.. Even then it doesn't effect anything you would be doing anyway. You can still download your xvid movie rips, and play your illegally obtained Bluray rips, MKV, Divx etc. I think people needs to read a little more before making such uninformed irrelevent statements becausce you sound moronic.

The 2600k is the fastest processor out period, its faster than the core i7 980x and much much much cheaper. Pair 2600k with this motherboard for an absolute monster of a system that is very cheap for what it is. Maybe the people whining about DRM are bitter older core i7 owners who feel cheated becausce this new cheaper tech is so much better than what they have and they paid a lot more for it. If not that then I really don't get why all the comments for something you obviously know nothing about..

Ignore the moronic statements, if you are looking to upgrade than a cheap p67 motherboard paired with 2600k is literally the best setup you can get and for under £350 a total bargain.

2600k vs core i7 980x (this says it all really) http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/142?vs=287


Edited By: Hanktank on Jan 25, 2011 20:51
#35
JunkMail
From another source -

Intel's New Chip Technology is building DRM into the Sandy Bridge!

Bad news Indeed
Quote:
Sandy Bridge, the latest line of Intel's Core i series CPUs, will reportedly feature faster speeds, better integrated graphics, lower power consumption and a DRM scheme to protect the content of motion picture studios.
Quote:
Intel will reportedly build a hardware security layer into the processors to prevent people from copying streaming videos.
Quote:
The technology it'll use is apparently called "Insider." It will incorporate an end-to-end protection layer and a management feature to unlock high-definition movies downloaded from online streaming services or off DVDs.
Quote:
"These are features built into the hardware, so if you're a Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) or a Warner Bros., you can program a time clock into a movie or code it so it's good for only a certain number of days after the consumer downloads it," In-Stat's McGregor pointed out. "It's all related to DRM."
Quote:
DRM, or digital rights management, has long been a bone of contention between consumers and content providers, mainly motion picture studios and recording companies. The Recording Industry Association of America spent more than US$16 million on legal fees in 2008 alone to sue individuals for downloading music illegally, according to its tax returns, as published on P2Pnet.
Quote:
Intel's apparently working with more studios to get their content. Further, it reportedly will include the "Insider" feature in lower-end consumer processors.
Source > http://www.technewsworld.com/story/Inte ... 1294213857

Let your friends know that the hardware MFG's have not learned anything from the Sony Debacle and that RIAA and MPAA are again not allowing the customer to back up even the media they buy as allowed by many laws. I do hope at least most people are aware of how many pieces of the whole pie RIAA and MPAA, are truly involved in and how much money their spending ....Who's pockets are they trying to fill? The politicians and government officials are just a few. Be forewarned.


If that isn't enough to keep you away from Sandy Bridge then good luck to you.


Do you not actually think the hackers will not hack this?

and besides - who 'really' gets stuff from Warner and Netflix?

I hate websites like that - they just peddle misinformation and basically lies!!

Hang on - the word I am looking for here is scaremongering.

Anyway - back to the point of the thread, Asrock are better than they were, at least now if you run the Asrock alongside a brand like Asus (yes Children, I know Asrock have links to Asus) they will run pretty much the same, unlike years gone by where most 'IT' folk would not use an Asrock mobo as their biscuit tray

But I still would not buy one



Edited By: CockneySpur on Jan 25, 2011 21:09
#36
CockneySpur - Jan 25, 2011 21:08
Do you not actually think the hackers will not hack this?
The whole point of DRM on the chip is that it makes it very hard to hack. I am sure that it will be done eventually or that a workaround will be found but I would rather not have it there in the first place.
and besides - who 'really' gets stuff from Warner and Netflix?
I hope that you are not suggesting that there are people who get their films from illegitimate sources. Surely not! ;)
I hate websites like that - they just peddle misinformation and basically lies!!
Hang on - the word I am looking for here is scaremongering.
I don’t think that it is scaremongering. DRM in your computer whether it is activated or not, is the first stage of a slippery slope that can only lead to us only being allowed to get our media and software from ‘approved sources’ which will be controlled by big businesses and probably governments. Look at how Apple already control the content and applications on their iPhones and iPads. They are now trying to implement this on their computers with their latest update of OSX where they installed the Mac App Store and a sneaky CommerceKit without which your Mac will not work. If you run the Mac App Store it scans all your HDs for software and reports this to the Store so that it knows what you have on your Mac and, it does this without your permission too. That kind of thing lies ahead of us all unless we resist and DRM on the chip will make it very hard to do so. Therefore I don’t think that it is scaremongering. It is an extremely important issue of which we should all be aware and refuse to accept.
#37
JunkMail
CockneySpur - Jan 25, 2011 21:08
Do you not actually think the hackers will not hack this?

The whole point of DRM on the chip is that it makes it very hard to hack. I am sure that it will be done eventually or that a workaround will be found but I would rather not have it there in the first place.
and besides - who 'really' gets stuff from Warner and Netflix?

I hope that you are not suggesting that there are people who get their films from illegitimate sources. Surely not! ;)
I hate websites like that - they just peddle misinformation and basically lies!!
Hang on - the word I am looking for here is scaremongering.

I don’t think that it is scaremongering. DRM in your computer whether it is activated or not, is the first stage of a slippery slope that can only lead to us only being allowed to get our media and software from ‘approved sources’ which will be controlled by big businesses and probably governments. Look at how Apple already control the content and applications on their iPhones and iPads. They are now trying to implement this on their computers with their latest update of OSX where they installed the Mac App Store and a sneaky CommerceKit without which your Mac will not work. If you run the Mac App Store it scans all your HDs for software and reports this to the Store so that it knows what you have on your Mac and, it does this without your permission too. That kind of thing lies ahead of us all unless we resist and DRM on the chip will make it very hard to do so. Therefore I don’t think that it is scaremongering. It is an extremely important issue of which we should all be aware and refuse to accept.


You still didn't answer me or half the other people in this thread. You clearly didn't understand this technology until we explained it to you and now you are pretending that you did all along and then advising us about it. Why not just admit that you mis-understood.
#38
jamesdew - Jan 26, 2011 08:01
You still didn't answer me or half the other people in this thread. You clearly didn't understand this technology until we explained it to you and now you are pretending that you did all along and then advising us about it. Why not just admit that you mis-understood.
@jamesdew - Sigh! No point in me continuing this discussion with you as you clearly haven’t understood what I said.

@everyone else - Do as you wish but don’t walk blindly into the trap that awaits you.
#39
JunkMail
jamesdew - Jan 26, 2011 08:01
You still didn't answer me or half the other people in this thread. You clearly didn't understand this technology until we explained it to you and now you are pretending that you did all along and then advising us about it. Why not just admit that you mis-understood.

@jamesdew - Sigh! No point in me continuing this discussion with you as you clearly haven’t understood what I said.

@everyone else - Do as you wish but don’t walk blindly into the trap that awaits you.


You really are infuriating, I responded to your points but you don't respond to anyone else's. You just keep repeating your opinion then say that I don't understand you with no explanation despite me giving you a detailed one.
Either you didn't bother to read my comments, you are ashamed to admit you made a mistake or you are an idiot. Perhaps all 3?

also what trap?? you still have not explained that.

Edited By: jamesdew on Jan 26, 2011 15:29
#40
JunkMail
Sandybridge bad


You no understand, buy more lemon pledge

Edited By: dealsonmeals on Jan 26, 2011 16:19

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