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BAYONETTA XBOX 360 and ps3 £17.85 delivered at shopto

£17.85 @ ShopTo
ps3 link http://www.shopto.net/PS3/VIDEO%20GAMES/PS3BA02-Bayonetta.html The best two Japanese action games of the year are diametrically opposed in approach. Demon's Souls is a brooding traipse thr… Read More
davver99 Avatar
7y, 3m agoFound 7 years, 3 months ago
ps3 link http://www.shopto.net/PS3/VIDEO%20GAMES/PS3BA02-Bayonetta.html

The best two Japanese action games of the year are diametrically opposed in approach. Demon's Souls is a brooding traipse through the corridors of purgatory, fair but relentlessly unforgiving. It teaches that modern videogames have made us weak and stupid, that our gaming muscles have atrophied through the efforts of so many mollycoddling developers. Every sword strike must be carefully considered, and button-mashers are not so much ridiculed as downright abused for their lack of sophistication. The result is a tense but ponderous experience, one that demands supreme trepidation before each step taken, careful contemplation before every input made.

In Bayonetta, meanwhile, you press a button and your television implodes.

Beloved is a celestial giant with the face of a three-year-old cherub and the body of a weightlifting Buddha, who falls from heaven to cobblestone with a squelchy thwack. Standing just 20 feet from this sudden epiphany, Bayonetta smirks to the cameraman, who's angled our viewpoint on the scene from ground level in order to fully celebrate the titular anti-heroine's ninja Barbie physique and secretary-cum-sex-worker attire. Her wink to lens is the starter pistol for interactivity.

You rotate the left analogue stick and hit the X button on cue, and Bayonetta cartwheels into a handstand, firing the twin pistols attached to her stilettos into Beloved's rolls of fat by clicking her heels in rapid succession. You break the sequence short with a triple jump through the air, esoteric purple wings momentarily sprouting from her arched back as you do so, before landing on Beloved's shoulders. The camera wheels and dives around, matching the kinetic assault of Bayonetta's body blows with dazzling movements of its own.

Finish him: an invitation to execute a Climax Attack on your wearied angelic opponent stamps onto screen. As you make the input, Bayonetta plants her feet square on the ground. Her black latex suit is absorbed into her skin, inexplicably extending the strands of her hair as it's drawn up through her body.

Shielding what's left of her modesty with her arms, Bayonetta flings her head backwards and her new 30-foot hair extensions assume the form of a black dragon: follicular shape shifting. It bares shadowy tooth shapes before lurching forward and down onto the cherub's torso. You madly hammer X to fill a Megaton bonus-point gauge, each mash encouraging the beast to chew a little harder. Then, in the final moment of climax, it rips Beloved's torso in two, dropping a crimson waterfall onto the cobblestones below like a dead weight.

Bayonetta's hair retracts itself back into her scalp. Her clothes re-envelop her body. She pops a lollipop into her mouth and sucks twice. Lara Croft shivers. Airport massacre levels, be damned. Bayonetta eats angels with her hairdo. Let's have a discussion about that on the Today programme.

For director Hideki Kamiya, Bayonetta is the final destination of a stream of flamboyant creative endeavour he first tapped eight years ago. With Devil May Cry, Kamiya invented his own sub-genre: a scrolling beat-'em-up that combined kung-fu wire combat with near endless combo strings and wrapped it all up in a camp gothic aesthetic. Rather than attempting to merely recreate Devil May Cry's successes in Bayonetta, Kamiya's bravely stripped away all of the dead weight from his initial template, ruthlessly streamlining the form and function to deliver something at once fresh and familiar. It's also, unquestionably, the greatest game yet to spill from this niche.

Developer Platinum Games' influence is clear from the off. Bayonetta discards the dark and dry anime tone of Kamiya's earlier work for something more tongue-in-cheek and irreverent. The story is delivered in bite-size, snappy cut-scenes, with slightly ropey albeit effective cutaway stylisation and camp voice-acting that soon wins you over. The approach suits the game style well, allowing for humorous quips and wry visual gags to be interspersed with the action, revelling in the silliness of its scenario in a way Devil May Cry never quite dared.

While the presentation teeters on the edge of objectification, with long, lingering shots of anatomically perplexing females, the characterisation does much to counterbalance the sexist overtones, and Bayonetta emerges as one of the strongest Japanese leads in recent memory. Discarding a grand gothic soundtrack, the game instead settles upon an incongruous but irresistible mix of J-pop and jazz. The thrill of batting away celestial bodies to a poorly enunciated lounge version of "Fly Me To the Moon" is unforgettable.

However, it's in combat that Bayonetta's splendour is fully revealed. The emphasis is on stringing together attacks, both ranged and melee, into giant, unbroken chains. Strip away the fury and spectacle and it works a little like Batman: Arkham Asylum's combo system, in that it's entirely possible for a skilled player to clear an area of opponents without taking damage or dropping the combo. Where the two games diverge is in Bayonetta's gigantic library of potential moves, the majority of which are unlocked to you right from the off. With four slots for weaponry (a piece in each hand and one tied to each foot), and separate move-lists for each type, the scope for unique play styles is dizzying.

To help you find your way through the labyrinthine move lists, Platinum delivers one of the smartest loading screens yet. While the next level's assets are loading in, you take control of the bespectacled witch in an abstract training space, free to pull off any move in her unlocked repertoire. On the right side of the screen a shopping list of Bayonetta's moves is displayed, each with a number next to it indicating how many times you have executed that move.

This plays on our natural inclination to catch 'em all, turning the very act of practicing into a mini-game. Moreover, as you string together different balletic moves, you absorb new techniques and approaches into your style. The next level automatically begins when loaded in, but by pressing the 'back' button you can choose to delay progression and simply play around in this space for a while. It's ingenious.

Bullets are the glue that links together your melee combos, every close encounter with an angel or seraphim strung together by a hail of pistol fire to keep the numbers rising. Dodge an enemy attack at the last moment and the game will temporarily slip into Witch Time, the screen doused in purple and all enemies reduced to extreme slow motion. Chain enough enemies together during the course of a battle and you earn magic points that can be used to summon forth torture equipment, such as giant chainsaws and opaque guillotines, devices that can be inserted into combos for additional points and exhibition. As fodder for YouTube showboating, few games rival Bayonetta.

For all this visual excitement, this is a game driven primarily by its narrative. Exploration has been reduced to a lean minimum, and puzzles are generally simple reaction-based challenges, requiring you to, for example, dodge a bolt of lightening to trigger Witch Time, in order to run through spurts of lava.

More often, each short cut-scene is followed by an encounter with multiple enemies in a locked-off area. These micro-fights are each scored and graded, the ultimate prize being a 'Pure Platinum' medal for those who manage an unbroken combo without taking a single hit. This rolling rhythm can be interrupted by trips to the Gates of Hell, Bayonetta's local bar, where she can upgrade weapons and purchase new moves, but generally every building block of the experience is sized and segued to prevent boredom and promote pace.

With two tiers of 'easy' level to play at, Bayonetta is welcoming to newcomers, who will be able to perform impressive strings of attacks simply by mixing up button inputs. Play the game at Normal difficulty or higher, however, and every move will need to be carefully timed, especially during the protracted boss fights, some of which make up entire chapters of the game. With scored leaderboards for almost every level, the firm emphasis is on competition, and at high-level play, Bayonetta demands mastery before victory.

The result is a game that exemplifies so much of what commentators claim has died in the Japanese game industry. A blast of creative brilliance, both technically accomplished, strategically deep and infused with rare imagination, Bayonetta represents the pinnacle of its chosen niche.
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davver99 Avatar
7y, 3m agoFound 7 years, 3 months ago
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#1
Hot Hot Hot!!
To the OP, the goto deal link says £17.95, £17.85 on the site!
Nice find mate.
#2
I do love a good price war..
#3
herby247
Hot Hot Hot!!
To the OP, the goto deal link says £17.95, £17.85 on the site!
Nice find mate.



i know i put the image for mag price sorted now thanks:thumbsup:
#4
Great deal mainly because you'll get it the next working day
banned#5
Good price, obviously just under cutting the Zavvi deal.

The Shopto website is pants though, was a nightmare getting through the checkout.
#6
Damnit, ordered from Zavvi earlier, knew I should have held out for someone else to price match.
#7
I bought this from Asda for £25 last week Bayonetta is a great game better then I thought it would be funny, fast and addictive it has some amazing boss fights it was just a shame Sega ported the PS3 version I wish Platinum Games would have worked on the PS3 version.

At this price £17.85 it's well worth buying
#8
Remember Zavvi offers so much percent quidco. Approx £1.25 cash back per copy. Don't know if its still active, but I ordered yesterday and was dispatched the same day. Never the less, for undercutting this deal is still hot, though I'm not familiar with the website personally, but have seen a few good deals linked to it on here.
#9
I ordered from Zavvi argh

haha oh well, 14p is hardly going to kill me
#10
Shocksystem93
I ordered from Zavvi argh

haha oh well, 14p is hardly going to kill me


but the wait might
#11
Brilliant game. Well worth the £40 I paid for it.
#12
Tumello
Remember Zavvi offers so much percent quidco. Approx £1.25 cash back per copy. Don't know if its still active, but I ordered yesterday and was dispatched the same day. Never the less, for undercutting this deal is still hot, though I'm not familiar with the website personally, but have seen a few good deals linked to it on here.



Hmm is its only 3.5%? Mine on TCB tracked at 63p
#13
currently none in stock for the ps3. Maybe they'll have some back in later.
#14
I just noticed "The best two Japanese action games of the year are diametrically opposed in approach.[U] Demon's Souls[/U] is a brooding traipse through the corridors of purgatory."

Dante's Inferno :x Demon's souls isn't out in Europe...
#15
I bet i've got Shopto credit on one of my accounts too. Glad I waited a little longer.

Edit: Awesome, £15.85 for moi :)
#16
ryanrulez
I just noticed "The best two Japanese action games of the year are diametrically opposed in approach.[U] Demon's Souls[/U] is a brooding traipse through the corridors of purgatory."

Dante's Inferno :x Demon's souls isn't out in Europe...


Dante's Inferno got pretty middling reviews, though...
#17
And it gets even cheaper! Zavvi had 8% quidco cash back opposed to shopto's 4%

Still hot though. Hope I get mine today from Zavvi
#18
I would use Zavvi after my ordeal last week preordered Bioshock 2 from shopto then just after they took the payment for it I got hit by credit card fraud for a £30 O2 topup coincidence I think not. My computer is well protected as well.
#19
Voted Hot. This is a great price for a game that's only a couple of months old, and was critically praised.

Personally I thought the game was AWFUL. But your mileage may vary.

FUZZCHOPZ
preordered Bioshock 2 from shopto then just after they took the payment for it I got hit by credit card fraud for a £30 O2 topup coincidence I think not. My computer is well protected as well.


I think that this probably was coincidence. I don't think it's fair to throw around accusations like that without proof. Having said that, this happened to me as well, within days of my last purchase from them, and a lot of people seem to say similar things, so I personally go elsewhere. I don't think it is Shopto, but I'm being overly cautious from now on.

That said, it happened to me again last month, and I have a new card, and haven't shopped there for months. I am also very careful with online shopping, and know how to keep my computer secure. I'm pretty sure it must be happening internally where it's happening - probably a few places. Dirty staff, or hacking in from outside? Don't know. Wish that we could easily get one-time-use credit cards, though.
#20
It could well be the company they use to process their card payments so I will not pre-order anything from them anymore & only pay via paypal if they have something at a really too good to miss price.
#21
good price infact it is excellent. but i prefer dante's so i'm not voting hot or cold. if dante's comes to this price in a month or so it will be scorchio!!! lol
#22
damn so it bombed in the UK just like it has in the US.

have no idea why people are ignoring quality games like this,.
#23
Do ShopTo take payment for pre-orders instantly?
#24
Good price.. might be tempted now.
#25
FUZZCHOPZ
It could well be the company they use to process their card payments so I will not pre-order anything from them anymore & only pay via paypal if they have something at a really too good to miss price.


I too had 2 X £15 payments on my debit card a few months back. I shop at shopto.net, but also a number of other retailers. I asked my bank if I could get the result of their investigation and they said they would not. Mainly as the investigation would be done by O2 and not them, and they said O2 probably would not even share that information from them.

Saying that, I've shopped at shopto.net since then with no repeat of this fraud, so I don't know who was to blame. I suppose as long as you check your account often, you'll be okay.
#26
kobashi
damn so it bombed in the UK just like it has in the US.

have no idea why people are ignoring quality games like this,.


We've been waiting for the price drop ;)

I personally am now accustomed to not paying over £20 for a new game (with the exception perhaps of MW2 @ £26). Also there has been a lot of excellent games out recently and I doubt many of us has had the time to play them all! I know I haven't.
#27
DragonChris
We've been waiting for the price drop ;)

I personally am now accustomed to not paying over £20 for a new game (with the exception perhaps of MW2 @ £26). Also there has been a lot of excellent games out recently and I doubt many of us has had the time to play them all! I know I haven't.


+1
#28
DragonChris
We've been waiting for the price drop ;)

I personally am now accustomed to not paying over £20 for a new game (with the exception perhaps of MW2 @ £26). Also there has been a lot of excellent games out recently and I doubt many of us has had the time to play them all! I know I haven't.


roryk83
+1


As I've said before on another thread (that I won't bore you with now); is it any wonder the UK economy has been so slow to come out of the recession when we are all now only paying "top, erm, pound" for titles where the publishers set the Recommended Retail Price artificially high so that when it is discounted in the first week it is still above the magical £20 mark?

BFN,

fp.
#29
fanpages
As I've said before on another thread (that I won't bore you with now); is it any wonder the UK economy has been so slow to come out of the recession when we are all now only paying "top, erm, pound" for titles where the publishers set the Recommended Retail Price artificially high so that when it is discounted in the first week it is still above the magical £20 mark?

BFN,

fp.


so are you saying that we should be paying RRP to assist the UK economy in getting out of recession?
#30
roryk83
so are you saying that we should be paying RRP to assist the UK economy in getting out of recession?


No... this web site was created so you would not have to pay the Recommended Retail Price for anything!

What I was saying was that if we all waiting for a £39.99 game to come down to £20 (without buying at the varying lower prices until it reaches that point) then developers &/or publishers will be less inclined to continue making innovative titles for us to enjoy in the future.

How would you like it if when you went to work tomorrow (assuming you are not one of the unfortunate unemployment statistics) that you were told that until you accepted half of your hourly rate there would be no need for you to continue working?

Yes, I know the market forces are different, but if SEGA, for instance, continue to publish titles that do not encourage a consumer to buy them in order to generate revenue for future products, then one/more outcomes will be reached that may be, but not limited to, one of the following:

a) SEGA go out of business putting many video games industry employees out of work & this devalues the work by other talented individuals who now find they has less worth to an employer because the labour (with a small "L") supply is over-subscribed with similarly talented parties.

b) SEGA limit their output to “Sonic The Hedgehog” titles only & do not invest in new genres or directions in their titles.

The end result is that less tax is paid to the UK Government (of the day) & their investment in the country is subsequently less in future years.

Yes, I know none of us wants to pay £39.99 for a title we consider is only worth £20.00 (or £17.95, £9.99, or whatever our favoured retail outlet sets the "magic" price at), but equally if we don't show our support for new ideas then there will be less incentive for the future.

That said, if we (in majority) did not buy the products at their suggestion opening price in the market, and a definite trend towards lower prices was noted in each subsequent release then the retail chain may then switch to a digital distribution completely &/or offer us a cheaper purchase price (at the detriment of the quantity, or even quality, of content of output).

I have bought “LittleBigPlanet” [PS3] four times (for use on four individual PS3 consoles). The first I pre-ordered at £39.99 from Play.com. Less than two weeks after release it was down to £29.99, then £17.99, and finally hit £9.99 just a month after it was first available.

The product to me was still a "£39.99" title at the time. It had given my family & I our "money's worth" (according to a phrase I used to hear when I was a child). To others the game was just worth £9.99 (if that). However, if every copy sold at £9.99 to the consumer then there would have been less revenue to redirect into the development of the downloadable content that followed (and still continues to do so fifteen months later) once every party along the retail delivery chain had taken their percentage before the resulting coffers reached Media Molecule.

I don’t expect people’s attitudes to change overnight, if at all, but it is interesting to find what influences the criteria that somebody expects to pay for a new game title.

BFN,

fp.
#31
Damn. Missed it Both out of stock and back up to £24.85

Ron
#32
fanpages
No... this web site was created so you would not have to pay the Recommended Retail Price for anything!



The product to me was still a "£39.99" title at the time. It had given my family & I our "money's worth" (according to a phrase I used to hear when I was a child). To others the game was just worth £9.99 (if that). However, if every copy sold at £9.99 to the consumer then there would have been less revenue to redirect into the development of the downloadable content that followed (and still continues to do so fifteen months later) once every party along the retail delivery chain had taken their percentage before the resulting coffers reached Media Molecule.

I don’t expect people’s attitudes to change overnight, if at all, but it is interesting to find what influences the criteria that somebody expects to pay for a new game title.

BFN,

fp.


Another school of thought is that there may be more initial sales if the price is reduced in the first place, perhaps making the developers feel better about themselves with so much demand :p But perhaps also gain more sales in the longer run.

Sure, a lot of hard work goes into making the games, but the reproduction value of the finished product is a lot less than the actual work that went in (i.e. burning of more cds). Thus, the cost of production is spread over hundreds of thousands of individual units and recovered through this way.

Kind of lost my train of thought there so I'll end my post now :thinking: However, if the games companies aren't innovative/inventive etc, then they won't make any sales anyway (or not enough to cover costs) so go bust. They need to keep it up in order to stay afloat in the industry.
#33
OOS ps3
#34
DragonChris
Another school of thought is that there may be more initial sales if the price is reduced in the first place, perhaps making the developers feel better about themselves with so much demand :p But perhaps also gain more sales in the longer run.


I appreciate that viewpoint, but I think a majority of people now rely on the fact that a video game will fall in price in a relatively short time.

However, in the current economic climate, I would suggest that if the same title was to be released on, say, the PS3 & Xbox 360 platforms, but at different prices [£35 (PS3) & £30 (Xbox 360), for example], then a similar percentage of prospective customers would wait for a price drop on their console of choice regardless of the release day selling price.

Granted, because some customers may have both consoles & have the option to select the cheaper of the two products skews any recorded figures but when those parties are taken out of the statistics I still stand by the suggestion that a majority of people will not buy at the first price seen regardless of what it is.

You could argue that there is little demand because the supply is too plentiful. A release of a multitude of games, some of which are very similar in nature, and a limited disposable income of the target consumer market, means that the consumer has to make sacrifices on selection. Some purchase just one title whereas before they may have bought two (or more) in the same period, & others still want those two (or three) so have to wait for a drop in price (of at least one of these) to be able to afford each one.

We saw earlier today (in the Zavvi "Bayonetta" thread) that people get very passionate about their dismissal or selection preference of a particular title.

I think in some cases this is because of the fact that individuals have had to make allowances for the current economic conditions. Buying the "wrong" title that proves to be unsuitable, or not buying a title at all due to cost, is defended very strongly to justify the decision to themselves primarily, not to those that make different choices.

Trading in a barter economy (such as making exchange trades via classifieds forums ), or re-selling to other private individuals (by online auction site, or even trading-in for another title at the store where the item was purchased), or even renting games rather than buying outright, also does not add to the revenue of the developers/publishers & they then have less to reinvest in the future. With limited income you have to expect this in the consumer market.

When the economic conditions are more healthy, more people tend towards outright ownership &/or retain unsuitable purchases for longer. Due to the length of this recession & the prospect of a following depression phase of the economic cycle I would expect that we may not see a return to this way of thinking for quite some time.

But back to the point (I think)...

Time & time again I see HotUKDeals members interested in a particular game because they continue to read & comment on each deal thread for that title saying "Good deal, almost my target price", or "Heat added... getting nearer to £20", or something similar. I am guilty of this too :)

If we tend towards an economy that is built on such a methodology then the original Recommended Retail Prices are likely to fall as the suppliers find that their market is restricted; there is a plentiful supply, but little demand. In order to re-address the balance prices must fall (simple supply & demand economic theory) in order for demand to increase. Alternatively, supply can be restricted (by way of provision of Collector's/Special/Limited Edition releases).

That is obviously great for us as consumers, but overall the economy suffers.

BFN,

fp.
#35
Zavvi's deal is now £17.84 ;)
#36
ordered from zavvi at £17.85, and despatched within the hour. £1.25 quidco tracked already also.
#37
fanpages
I appreciate that viewpoint, but I think a majority of people now rely on the fact that a video game will fall in price in a relatively short time.



If we tend towards an economy that is built on such a methodology then the original Recommended Retail Prices are likely to fall as the suppliers find that their market is restricted; there is a plentiful supply, but little demand. In order to re-address the balance prices must fall (simple supply & demand economic theory) in order for demand to increase. Alternatively, supply can be restricted (by way of provision of Collector's/Special/Limited Edition releases).

That is obviously great for us as consumers, but overall the economy suffers.

BFN,

fp.


One small issue that should/could be factored in is the release of additional content via DLC or PSN. An additional source of revenue after the initial purchase of the game.

Factoring in supply and demand, surely the lowering of price is a signal of demand, being that the initial product price is being deemed too high by the market, thus the price falls to the equilibrium level where supply meets demand. Once the product has reached our mystical target price, we begin purchasing - Could this not be a sign that RRPs have been set too high for too long?

I don't have enough time unfortunately to discuss the economic impact on the change of price of games, however it is rather interesting, but does have a lot of variables and a lot of subsequent issues that arise on both sides through a price change.

What I can say though, is that I'm more than happy as a consumer to see the price fall :)
#38
edit:

wrong thread

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