Bike Light Set £3.99 Delivered @ 7dayshop - HotUKDeals
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Bike Light Set £3.99 Delivered @ 7dayshop

Loopijuce Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
7dayshop Power Beam Front & Rear LED Bike Light Set
Normal Price £6.99
Special Price £3.99 Delivered

Stay safe when riding your bike with these great bike lights. The super bright LEDs will help you stay seen. Easy to attach to any bike with front and back clip on mechanisms they can be in action in minutes. Both the front and back lights can also be set for either fixed or flashing light for extra visability.

What's In The Box
Front light (requires 4 x AAA Batteries - Not Included)
Rear light (requires 2 x AAA Batteries - Not Included)
2 Clip On Mountings
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Loopijuce Avatar
5y, 11m agoFound 5 years, 11 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
Anyone used these ones?
#2
same lights a pound each in pound land..

the bracket mounts are a bit on the small side.

light up well for road use..
you get what u pay for..
1 Like #3
The plastic used on these is crap, the front light broke off it's mount the first bump I went over and smashed into a million pieces.

Edited By: Orange Boy on Dec 31, 2010 15:55
#4
Orange Boy
The plastic used on these is crap, the front light broke off it's mount the first bump I went over and smashed into a million pieces.

Same here.
#5
Orange Boy
The plastic used on these is crap, the front light broke off it's mount the first bump I went over and smashed into a million pieces.

I had a similar experience with a 52 LED from dealextreme - about £10 worth bouncing down the road. Light still worked, just couldn't attach it to bike anymore.
#6
very bright multi function lights but as previous posters say. the bracket and housing are very very weak and brittle .
#7
Brackets are weak and broke when installing, but front light made a decent torch and put back light on my jacket collar.
#8
#9
T45
Might take a while to arrive, but bike light set below is very good value for money.http://****.co.uk/5w-LED-CREE-Flashlight-Torch-Bike-Bicycle-Rear-Light-G-/150440340100?pt=UK_SportsLeisure_Cycling_Bike_Lights&hash=item2306f16a84

Can't tell from pics - is the front light LED or standard bulb type?
#10
Had one of these (the front one). It had a very weak mount and broke very quickly. I bought it from ebay though for 99p.
#11
I've ordered some for my fiance's bike, i have some myself and i cycle to and from work at 4 in the morning and they do the job just fine.

thanks for posting.
#12
yes as said, these are sold in pound shops, I bought one, which broke soon after purchase,

Edited By: solidamber on Jan 01, 2011 00:33: spelling
#13
stephmcd
I've ordered some for my fiance's bike, i have some myself and i cycle to and from work at 4 in the morning and they do the job just fine.

thanks for posting.


Does she have any sticky tape?
#14
i gave up on cheap...had some from dealextreme but they broke soon after bought these at wiggle when they were about £12 - excellent pretty cheap lights

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/smart-bspoke-1w-front-light/

and these when they were about £3 at the same time

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/smart-polaris-7-led-rear-light/



Edited By: royals on Jan 01, 2011 00:21
#15
worthinger
T45
Might take a while to arrive, but bike light set below is very good value for money.http://****.co.uk/5w-LED-CREE-Flashlight-Torch-Bike-Bicycle-Rear-Light-G-/150440340100?pt=UK_SportsLeisure_Cycling_Bike_Lights&hash=item2306f16a84
Can't tell from pics - is the front light LED or standard bulb type?
Cree is an american company that build a blindingly powerful LED built onto a small curcuit board I have a simular one, it gives a brighter beam than many car headlights.
#16
You don't need a good light, you just need a bracket that doesn't break easily. This light is perfectly okay for being seen on the roads but it's really let down by how fragile the bracket is.
http://www.google.co.uk/products?hl=en&safe=off&q=smart+1/2+watt&scoring=p

I recommend you get the following above (smart 1/2 watt- the long one) for a rear light as it's very bright. I also recommend buying two rear lights (it's important for your safety incase one goes out without you realising), the second can be a cheap one from ebay. Run one solid and the other one flashing and you'll be fine.

Ah ha. Found the Smart 1/2 Watt rear light for less than £11 delivered. Well worth the money imo.
http://www.highonbikes.com/smart-lunar-r-led-superflash-rear-light-flash-constant.html







Edited By: sotomonkey on Jan 01, 2011 02:49: .
#17
Just a heads up as they say, These lamps may be great but if you are on the roads you need to have approved lighting on your bike, I think but am not sure of the law now that they need to be front and back BS certified, check where you ride. You also need reflectors on the bike by law and all could also need to be fitted in the correct places as well. If not you could lose any claims on insurance in the case of accident etc even if not your fault. I know that the old lights was not very good but they was legal, thats a big consideration in todays litigation culture. Top and bottom of it is you need to make sure you are legal on the road.

Edited By: mysti on Jan 01, 2011 05:07
#18
mysti
Just a heads up as they say, These lamps may be great but if you are on the roads you need to have approved lighting on your bike, I think but am not sure of the law now that they need to be front and back BS certified, check where you ride. You also need reflectors on the bike by law and all could also need to be fitted in the correct places as well. If not you could lose any claims on insurance in the case of accident etc even if not your fault. I know that the old lights was not very good but they was legal, thats a big consideration in todays litigation culture. Top and bottom of it is you need to make sure you are legal on the road.


Couple of points on this.

Reflectors: I think that manufacturers are required by law to fit reflectors to any bike they sell, so unless your bike is second hand and someone has taken the reflectors off, most people will already have these.

Insurance: Although I'd recommend getting third party liability insurance by for eg. getting an annual membership to CTC below, anyone who's likely to be insured are unlikely to be using a set of lights like these but I take your point on BS certification, that said I'm not 100% certain about this rule. It
http://www.ctc.org.uk/desktopdefault.aspx?tabid=4089


Ah ha. Everything we need to know here.

Lighting Regulations
Abbreviated to RVLR: the Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations 1989 (amended in 1994, 2005 and 2009) require pedal cycles to have various lights and reflectors fitted, clean and working properly, when being ridden on a public road between sunset and sunrise. Cyclists may also be required to light up in conditions of seriously reduced visibility during the day, but only if they have functional lights already fitted. Lights are not required when the cycle is stationary or being pushed along the roadside.

It has to be said that the fine details of RVLR are seldom enforced; and provided you show some kind of white light in front and red behind you are unlikely to be challenged. If you are involved in a night-time accident however, any slight illegality with respect to your lights or reflectors may be regarded as contributory negligence. The following items are the minimum required, on a bicycle or tricycle, in order to ride it legally at night:

Front Lamp
One is required, showing a white light, positioned centrally or offside, up to 1500mm from the ground, aligned towards and visible from the front. If capable of emitting a steady light it must be marked as conforming to BS6102/3 or an equivalent EC standard. If capable of emitting only a flashing light, it must emit at least 4 candela.

Rear Lamp
One is required, to show a red light, positioned centrally or offside, between 350mm and 1500mm from the ground, at or near the rear, aligned towards and visible from behind. If capable of emitting a steady light it must be marked as conforming to BS3648, or BS6102/3, or an equivalent EC standard. If capable of emitting only a flashing light, it must emit at least 4 candela.

Rear Reflector
One is required, coloured red, marked BS6102/2 (or equivalent), positioned centrally or offside, between 250mm and 900mm from the ground, at or near the rear, aligned towards and visible from behind.

Pedal Reflectors
Four are required, coloured amber and marked BS6102/2 (or equivalent), positioned so that one is plainly visible to the front and another to the rear of each pedal.

Exceptions and explanations
Age brings privileges. To name but two: cycles manufactured before October 1990 can have any kind of white front lamp that is visible from a reasonable distance, and pre-October 1985 cycles don’t need pedal reflectors.

Cycle trailers need a rear lamp as above and a triangular rear reflector with an ECE mark III or IIIA. (Trailer manufacturers appear blissfully unaware of this however, and generally fit cycle-type reflectors whilst making no provision for a rear lamp.) In the absence of any more specific requirement, a cycle-type rear reflector can be presumed okay on a sidecar, which also needs its own front and rear lamps.
The Euro-friendly clause
Thanks to a European Directive of a few years ago, wherever a British Standard (BS) is referred to, equivalent standards from other EC countries must now also be recognised, but only if they provide an equivalent level of safety etc. It’s not exactly clear which do. However Germany has arguably the strictest cycle lighting laws in Europe so we consider it safe to use equipment that is marked accordingly, with a “K~number”.

It should also be noted that wherever a British Standard is referred to, that reference applies to a specific edition. In the case of BS6102/3, that is the 1986 edition, as amended on 15th April 1995 and again on 1st September 2003. These amendments (in conjunction with the 1994 amendment of RVLR) removed the filament bulb design restrictions, so that lamps may now get their light from LEDs, HIDs – or whatever comes next!

Dynamos
Dynamo powered lights are legal even though they go out when you stop. That’s allowed so long as you stop on the left. Usually it’s much safer to stay where you are (e.g. in a stationary queue with left-turning traffic filtering up your inside), since most cars do stop for red traffic lights and those that don’t are unlikely to pay more heed to a bike lamp! Nevertheless: dynamos and lamps are now available with reliable back-up (standlight) features that either keep them on or light up a diode instead of the bulb.

Additional lamps and reflectors
Some cyclists like to fit extra lamps and reflectors, in addition to the approved ones specified above. This is perfectly legal provided they are the correct colour and in an appropriate position. These optional lamps and reflectors do not have to comply with any standards, but it’s illegal to use some designs of lamp or reflector that have specific other uses. You must not, for instance, show a red light at the front, or a white light to the rear, or fit triangular-shaped rear reflectors on anything other than trailer.

The suggestion that any lamp on a bicycle might cause undue dazzle or discomfort to other users of the road would have been laughable a few years ago, but not any more. It is not only illegal but doesn't actually improve your safety, should the person driving a heavy motor vehicle towards you be temporarily blinded by your headlamp! So please don't let it do that.

The Pedal Cycles (Safety) Regulations (PCSR) ensure that every new bicycle is sold with several extra reflectors, not required by RVLR, but (strangely) does nothing at all to facilitate the fitment of front and rear lamps. These additional reflectors are found on the sides of the wheels, clear white or coloured yellow, and there's also a "white" reflector on the front of the bike. You are at liberty to remove the front and side reflectors, but beware that there are some situations (albeit most unusual) where a front reflector might improve your safety, and be sure to fit the necessary front and rear lamps.

Flashers
Thanks to the enactment of Statutory Instrument 2005 No. 2559: on 23rd October 2005, it finally became legal to have a flashing light on a pedal cycle, provided it flashes between 60 and 240 times per minute (1 – 4Hz). Even better: it became possible for a flashing light to be approved, meaning no other light would be needed in that position. And since BS6102/3 does not cater for flashing, approval is granted simply on the basis of brightness (as specified above). But because DfT very much prefer things to be evaluated against a proper technical standard: any flashing lamp that is also capable of emitting a steady light is approved only if it conforms with BS6102/3 when switched to steady mode. And most flashing lights do also have a steady mode, so they may be legal but not approved. Technically you'll need another lamp that is.

Unfortunately Britain is not the force it once was in the world cycle market, with the result that very few manufacturers can nowadays be bothered to test and mark their products to our standards. So it can be really hard nowadays, to find any approved lamp for sale these days, flashing or not!

Fortunately our Police seem hardly more concerned by legal niceties than lamp manufacturers. And since it became theoretically legal to ride a bike with just flashing lights on it, they're nowadays no more likely to quibble its legal status than one equipped with steady lights – unless they're rather dim (the lights that is) or involved in an accident. Then it's possible that someone might look a bit closer.

Chris Juden 2010-11-22


http://www.ctc.org.uk/desktopdefault.aspx?tabid=4071


Edited By: sotomonkey on Jan 01, 2011 06:21
banned#19
banned 1 Like #20
if you want some serious light then this is a bit of a bargain
UltraFire WF-501B SSC-P7-CSXO 3-Mode 900-Lumen Memory LED Flashlight
http://www.bestofferbuy.com/ultrafire-wf501b-sscp7csxo-3mode-900lumen-memory-led-flashlight-with-strap-118650117670-p-63155.html?SSAID=314743&utm_source=shareasale&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=affiliate1

You'll need some good rechargeable batteries for this though as it is very power hungry
#21
The rear light looks exactly the same as the one from £land. It feels really cheaply made and i didnt think the light was particularly strong so ended up buying a cateye hd501 which I'm very happy with and glad I spent the extra £s. Will use the £land as additional flasher
#22
Just voted hot, I only ride road bikes, so don't tend to 'bounce' over stuff, will be using these as a second pair backing up my expensive set as above. Two lights confuse the hell out of car drivers, they guess you're a moped and tend not to pull out as much, as if Im as slow as a moped!!! (_;)
#23
If there the same as the Poundland ones, the brackets will probably break when you try to attach them to your frame.
#24
Reflectors? Pffft!?! I have a rear mudguard fitted to my seatpost, which for me is a necessity. That takes up a LOT of available space. So I have one very decent quality flashing red LED sharing the seatpost with it, and a cheap but powerful Poundshop red LED secured under my seat. At the front I also have two lights. When I go out I fit one £40 Fenix Cree LED torch mounted with a velcro lockblock, that lights the entire road up, and the other is a permanently mounted cheap but powerful Poundshop flashing LED, which is the 'Power Beam' one discussed here (superglued to its cheap bracket to make it very secure, as I can get to the battery compartment by screwing the head off). So I have no room left anywhere for reflectors - the bike had them but I removed them to fit superior gear. I am certainly not removing powerful lights to comply with laws on piddling reflectors....not a chance.

Hopefully any police I come across will have more sense than to grieve me over reflectors when I already look like a freakin' Christmas tree coming down the road!!! (Even more so with my reflective sash I wear and reflective stickers on my helmet). There could be an old lady getting mugged around the corner, so hopefully they have more sense than to be looking out for such details. Of course I understand the need for standards and set rules, but common sense should prevail... and I suspect that is the attitude of most traffic police anyway. If you look visible and have at least one working front and one working rear light, they really should leave you be.

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