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Bluetooth handsfree £19.99

£19.99 @ LIDL
Lidl have this Bluetooth plug in handsfree kit for £19.99 - seems like a good deal. Bluetooth Handsfree Set The handsfree way to help you stay safe and legal Excellent audio quality with DSP (Di… Read More
Fussy Avatar
1d, 3m agoFound 1 decade, 3 months ago
Lidl have this Bluetooth plug in handsfree kit for £19.99 - seems like a good deal.



Bluetooth Handsfree Set

The handsfree way to help you stay safe and legal
Excellent audio quality with DSP (Digital Signal Processing)
Compatible with Bluetooth V1.2
Voice dialling
Volume control
Connection via 12V in-car power supply
Noise reduction
LED operation light
Free 3 year manufacturer's warranty

Price per item
19.99*
Only available while stocks last
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Fussy Avatar
1d, 3m agoFound 1 decade, 3 months ago
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1 Like #1
Choices, choices!

Choice 1
= Don't use a mobile at all whilst at the steering wheel
= Don't break the law + No cost + No points

Choice 2
= Use a mobile whilst at the steering wheel
= Break the law + possible deserved £60 fine + possible deserved 3 points

Choice 3
= Use a mobile with handsfree kit whilst at the steering wheel
= Break the law + £19.99 (this deal) + possible deserved £60 fine + possible deserved 3 points


ps

This thread title needs changing!
#2
Well said jerry - was just about to type something very similar (except for Choice 3).

Phoning while driving - Just say no... :|
#3
It isn't illegal to talk on your phone while driving if you are using a headset. As long as the phone stays out of your hand then you are fine.

One more thing, talking on your phone with it in your hand even if parked with the engine running is a 60 quid fine and 3 points.

Turn off your engine when you have safely pulled over to talk.
#4
Choice 3
= Use a mobile with handsfree kit whilst at the steering wheel
= Break the law + £19.99 (this deal) + possible deserved £60 fine + possible deserved 3 points


Is this correct?
Thought you could use handsfree whilst driving?
#5
phil001
Is this correct?
Thought you could use handsfree whilst driving?


Yes you can, I think they are trying to make the point that you are not concentrating if you are on the phone while driving. The same was argued over radios in cars and talking to other passengers.

You won't stop people talking on phones and I admit they do concentrate less, we've all been behind the white van that slews across the road and you notice the driver on the phone.

But the law does not yet stop you using a hands free so choice 3 is daft.
#6
They would like to make hands free illegal as well but it is not enforceable due to the difficulty in proving someone is using it.
#7
1) What is the law about mobile phones while driving?

It is illegal to drive a vehicle or ride a motorbike and use a hand held mobile phone or similar device. It is also illegal to supervise a learner and use a hand-held phone. Hands-free phones are also a distraction and you risk prosecution for not having proper control of a vehicle if the police see you driving poorly while using one.


A hand held device is something that "is or must be held at some point during the course of making or receiving a call or performing any other interactive communication function.
A device "similar" to a mobile phone includes a device that can be used for sending or receiving spoken or written messages, sending or receiving still or moving images or providing Internet access.
If you accept a roadside fixed penalty notice, you will receive 3 points on your licence and a fine of £60. If a case goes to court, in addition to points, you could face discretionary disqualification on top a maximum fine of £1,000 (or £2,500 in the case of drivers of buses/coaches and goods vehicles).
#8
3) Is a driver allowed to use any other equipment like a hands-free mobile phone? Why don't you just make it illegal to use all mobiles when driving?

The use of a hands-free phone or other equipment is not specifically prohibited because it is difficult for police to see it in use. But if you drive poorly because you are distracted by a phone conversation for example, then the police can prosecute for failing to have proper control of the vehicle. The same penalty applies as for hand-held phones - 3 points and a £60 fine.

If there is an incident or a crash, the use of any phone could be justification for the charges of careless or dangerous driving. The penalties on conviction for such offences include heavy fines, endorsement, disqualification and, in serious cases, imprisonment. Courts are taking a serious view in such cases.

http://www.thinkroadsafety.gov.uk/advice/mobilephones.htm
#9
Note the end of this one, specifically designed to make sure the police are not prosecuted for using their radios.

5) When is a driver allowed to use a hand-held phone?
There is an exception for calls to 999 or 112 in a genuine emergency where it would be unsafe or impractical to stop.

Using 2-way radio equipment when driving is not a specific offence. Remember that a conversation could still distract from the concentration needed to drive safely. If you do not have proper control, then the police can still take action.
#10
davelfc
If there is an incident or a crash, the use of any phone could be justification for the charges of careless or dangerous driving.


If there is an incident or a crash the police have powers to access mobile phone records to see if a driver's mobile was in use at the time of the incident. Have heard of a number of cases where action has been taken against the driver where this has shown that they were using their phone while driving (ie no one else in the car who could have been using the driver's phone).

So I guess you can't count on getting away with it by hiding your phone after a bump! :whistling:
#11
esarty
If there is an incident or a crash the police have powers to access mobile phone records to see if a driver's mobile was in use at the time of the incident. Have heard of a number of cases where action has been taken against the driver where this has shown that they were using their phone while driving (ie no one else in the car who could have been using the driver's phone).

So I guess you can't count on getting away with it by hiding your phone after a bump! :whistling:


The police would have a job proving you used the phone though. Then again if you were driving so poorly while on a hands free set that you caused an accident you deserve to be prosecuted.
#12
I still think it's a good deal!
Better than them stupid bluetooth earpieces people use.
#13
Jerry

You have got your facts wrong mate. So an apology would be nice.
#14
Fussy
Jerry

You have got your facts wrong mate.


No I haven't.

http://www.thinkroadsafety.gov.uk/campaigns/mobilephones/mobilephones.htm


Penalty Update - 27 February 2007

New legislation to increase the penalty for using a hand-held phone whilst driving will come into force on 27 February 2007. The current fine of £30 will increase to £60 and three penalty points on your licence. Penalty points can mean higher insurance costs. If you get six points within two years of passing your test, your licence will be revoked and you will need to re-sit the test. If the case goes to court, you could risk a maximum fine of £1,000, which rises to £2,500 for the driver of a bus, coach, or heavy goods vehicle.

A driver can also be prosecuted for using a hands-free device if you are not in proper control of your vehicle when using the device. The penalties are the same - £60 fine and three points on your licence.
If you are an employer you can be prosecuted if you require employees to make or receive mobile calls while driving. It is an offence to cause or permit the use of a hand-held mobile phone when driving. It is also an offence to cause or permit a driver not to have proper control of a vehicle.

Callers also play an important role in keeping the roads safe. If the person you are speaking to is driving, please terminate the call and arrange to speak to them later.

Why are the penalties going up?

It is hard to do two things at once and research has shown that if you are using a mobile phone whilst driving, you are four times more likely to have a crash.
In fact, if you use any type of mobile be it hands free or hands held, your reaction times are worse than if you were driving under the influence of alcohol. Tests have shown that reaction times for drivers using a hand-held phone slows reactions by 50% when compared to normal driving and by 30% when compared to being drunk (Direct Line Mobile Phone Report 2002).
The use of a mobile phone often involves distractions which could be visual, auditory, mental or physical (Direct Line Mobile Phone Report 2002).
Even if you're a careful driver, it's easy to be distracted by a phone call or text message - and that split second lapse in concentration could result in a crash.
#15
davelfc
The police would have a job proving you used the phone though. Then again if you were driving so poorly while on a hands free set that you caused an accident you deserve to be prosecuted.


They've been known to access the logs at your mobile phone provider - all mobile service providers record the start and end times of all calls, and also when you switch your phone on or off, and the approximate location of the phone at these times.

This shows whether the phone was being used at the time of the incident - and if you are the only person in the car with the phone on you you're going to have a hard time convincing a prosecutor it wasn't you using it. This evidence has been used successfully by the police in quite a number of cases.

On an aside, similar evidence has been used to track movements of criminals and victims - such records helped prove Maxine Carr wasn't in Soham at the time of that incident (as she claimed in her cover story for Ian Huntley) and track the last movements of Jessica Chapman's mobile phone when it disconnected from the network due to a flat battery.

Such records however has got the "invasion of privacy" groups rather annoyed.
[admin]#16
Changed the title - the previous one was misleading.
#17
esarty
They've been known to access the logs at your mobile phone provider - all mobile service providers record the start and end times of all calls, and also when you switch your phone on or off, and the approximate location of the phone at these times.


You mean the cell that the phone was using, in which case quite a wide area in some instances (rural areas.) Unless you admitted it, I can't see them being able to prove it unless someone saw you and as far as I am aware they can't go back and locate where you were when you were making a call only where you are now or when you last switched off your phone. (I am willing to be proved wrong on this)

In fact some service providers don't even offer this much information.

However if you cause an accident when on your phone no matter what kind of hands free device you are using then you should be punished. Who knows they might have the technology one day to stop phones from working when they are moving above a certain speed.
#18
davelfc
You mean the cell that the phone was using, in which case quite a wide area in some instances (rural areas.) Unless you admitted it, I can't see them being able to prove it unless someone saw you and as far as I am aware they can't go back and locate where you were when you were making a call only where you are now or when you last switched off your phone. (I am willing to be proved wrong on this)


Yes, that's what I meant - the approximate location when the phone is switched on/off. Obviously some places are more appoximate than others!

The only point I am trying to make is that people should be aware that if they do use their phone while driving and it causes them to become distracted and cause an accident then they shouldn't necessarily be able to rely on a defence of "You can't prove I was using my phone..."

It's good to see that most people here agree that driving while phoning can be a bad thing. Have lost count of the number of times I've had to take evasive action (or seen other people swerving) because another driver is chatting on their mobile :x
#19
My Company sent this out internally for clarification - :)
Since December 2003, it has been illegal to use a hand held phone while driving. From 27 February 2007, the fine for driving whilst using a hand held telephone increased from £30 to £60, and in addition, 3 penalty points are added to the driver’s licence. These penalties can be significantly increased if you are deemed not in proper control of your vehicle whilst using a phone, even if you are using a hands-free kit.

Since 2003, the xxx (my company) rules for using a mobile phone while driving have included:
[LIST]
[*]Only use a mobile phone in a fixed cradle without any microphones, earpieces or receivers worn on the body
[*]Never send a text or try to read one
[*]Never initiate a call and only receive the briefest of calls
[*]Never phone people who you believe are driving other than in an emergency[/LIST]Managers must ensure that their teams are aware of the current xxx rules on mobile phones and driving, and that they follow them.

Recent research by the Transport Research Laboratory has identified that drivers are more likely to have a accident using a mobile phone while driving, and that drivers’ reactions while distracted by using a mobile phone are worse than if alcohol up to the legal limit for driving had been consumed. Even if you regard yourself as a careful and responsible driver, it is easy to be distracted by a phone call or text message – and that split second lapse could result in an accident.
Many businesses, including some of our suppliers and customers, are prohibiting mobile phone use while driving. For example, it you work on the XX account, you must switch your mobile phone off before driving. This policy is also under active consideration in xxx . If your work is dependent on mobile phone communication while you are driving, we recommend that you start to think now about what you would need to change if you were required to switch your phone off while you are on the move.
#20
Fussy
I still think it's a good deal!
Better than them stupid bluetooth earpieces people use.


If it worked.....its rubbish, the person can be heard but they cant hear you.

My old Nokia on loudspeaker works better.

Will Lidl take it back on the basis goods not fit for purpose cause they aint in my book
#21
A driver can also be prosecuted for using a hands-free device if you are not in proper control of your vehicle when using the device. The penalties are the same - £60 fine and three points on your licence.

This statement is stupid as you can be prosecuted at any time for not been in proper control of your vehicle even if you are not using a handsfree kit. It is called driving without due care and attention.
#22
newbie1001
A driver can also be prosecuted for using a hands-free device if you are not in proper control of your vehicle when using the device. The penalties are the same - £60 fine and three points on your licence.

This statement is stupid as you can be prosecuted at any time for not been in proper control of your vehicle even if you are not using a handsfree kit. It is called driving without due care and attention.


True - it's yet another example of a new law being passed when there was a perfectly adequate one already.

There's also the point that they can have all the penalty points and fines they like, but if the law is not enforced it doesn't mean a damn thing. Compare with the new law about booster seats for kids - it sold a lot of seats, but I've yet to hear of anyone being done for not using one.

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