Canon Powershot A480 / 10.0 Megapixel / 3.3x Optical Zoom / 2.5" LCD / Digital Camera / Black was £119.99 now £ 69.99 @Play.com - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Description

Fun, pocket-sized and totally intuitive.
Every aspect of the PowerShot A480 has been redesigned with one thing in mind: ease of use. Thanks to a new, simplified button layout - with dedicated buttons for zoom, mode and playback and an improved User Interface, it's as easy to operate as it is to carry. Compact proportions make the PowerShot A480 an ideal 'take-anywhere' camera, perfect for capturing spontaneous snapshots.

Compact, Intuitive and Fun
Small and light enough to slip into a pocket, the PowerShot A480 has a classic, stylish design that feels great in the hand. With Canon's market leading optical Image Stabilizer you can keep images sharp by reducing the effects of camera shake throughout the zoom range.

15 Shooting Modes
15 shooting modes - including dedicated Kids & Pets and Indoor modes - make it easy to get the right settings for any scene. Select the mode you want and let the camera take care of everything else. Supplement your photos with smooth, 30fps VGA video clips.

Great People Shots
A suite of Face Detection technologies detects up to nine faces in a scene and adjusts focus, exposure, flash settings and white balance - for optimal results with natural-looking skin tones.

Motion Detection Technology
Motion Detection Technology uses changes in scene information and scene brightness to accurately identify subject motion. The optimal ISO level is then automatically set, to minimise blur and maximise image quality.
More From Play.Com:
×
Get the Hottest Deals Daily
Stay informed. Once a day, we'll send you the deals our members voted as the best.
Failed
totalpower Avatar
6y, 7m agoFound 6 years, 7 months ago
Options

All Comments

(13) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Not especially cheap for an AA powered camera.
#2
good price for a canon
#3
Besford
Not especially cheap for an AA powered camera.


It is cheap and it is a quality bit if kit. AA power is a bonus. I think you may be getting this confused with the cheapo ones for the same price in Argos and Tesco.

Google the reviews.
#4
nonstop
It is cheap and it is a quality bit if kit. AA power is a bonus. I think you may be getting this confused with the cheapo ones for the same price in Argos and Tesco.

Google the reviews.

You may prefer AA power but it still shouldn't cost as much as a cam with a decent battery and charger in the box. Yes, it's a decent brand and I didn't say it's poor quality but £70 buys you a lot of snapshot camera these days. Don't be naive.

My Tesco had a Panasonic FS4 for less tonight (rechargeable, 4x zoom, etc., etc.). Didn't post it as it may be a one off but I stand by my assertion - Canon or not this isn't especially cheap for an AA cam.
#5
Besford
You may prefer AA power but it still shouldn't cost as much as a cam with a decent battery and charger in the box. Yes, it's a decent brand and I didn't say it's poor quality but £70 buys you a lot of snapshot camera these days. Don't be naive.

My Tesco had a Panasonic FS4 for less tonight (rechargeable, 4x zoom, etc., etc.). Didn't post it as it may be a one off but I stand by my assertion - Canon or not this isn't especially cheap for an AA cam.


I'm sensing a bit of deja vu here, but just to add my own thoughts, 4 good quality AA NiMH batteries and a charger can be got for less than £10, this will give you a spare set of batteries that can be charging whilst you use the camera, if you wanted to do this with a camera with a custom Li-ion rechargeable then you'd have to buy a spare battery and ideally a separate charger so that you charge your spare battery while using your camera (I could be wrong, but I assume that the cheaper Li-ion powered cameras charge the battery whilst in the camera). Again I'm just making an assumption here, but I'd guess that a spare Li-ion battery and charger would cost about the same as the AA's and charger.
#6
Mike73
I'm sensing a bit of deja vu here, but just to add my own thoughts, 4 good quality AA NiMH batteries and a charger can be got for less than £10, this will give you a spare set of batteries that can be charging whilst you use the camera, if you wanted to do this with a camera with a custom Li-ion rechargeable then you'd have to buy a spare battery and ideally a separate charger so that you charge your spare battery while using your camera (I could be wrong, but I assume that the cheaper Li-ion powered cameras charge the battery whilst in the camera). Again I'm just making an assumption here, but I'd guess that a spare Li-ion battery and charger would cost about the same as the AA's and charger.

All true and may even be good advice - but still misses the point I've made, which is all about price/value.

Forget the utility of the kit (I happen to prefer Li-ion, others prefer AA, that's not my argument here) but if there's no charger or battery in the box the 'kit' should be cheaper. On this basis, 70 quid for this 'bare', basic camera is not good value. It may be a great little camera, it may be exactly the kind you want, you may even have dozens of excellent rechargeable AAs already, but it should be this cheap or cheaper because you get less in the box. If you can buy a decent Li-ion kit for around this price (and you can) then this is not especially good value.

Can't think of any other way of saying it - maybe I should just give up trying!

PS My rechargeable cameras all have seperate chargers (Panasonic, Casio and Olympus)
#7
Besford
All true and may even be good advice - but still misses the point I've made, which is all about price/value.

Forget the utility of the kit (I happen to prefer Li-ion, others prefer AA, that's not my argument here) but if there's no charger or battery in the box the 'kit' should be cheaper. On this basis, 70 quid for this 'bare', basic camera is not good value. It may be a great little camera, it may be exactly the kind you want, you may even have dozens of excellent rechargeable AAs already, but it should be this cheap or cheaper because you get less in the box. If you can buy a decent Li-ion kit for around this price (and you can) then this is not especially good value.

Can't think of any other way of saying it - maybe I should just give up trying!

PS My rechargeable cameras all have seperate chargers (Panasonic, Casio and Olympus)


Once again we're going to have to agree to disagree on this one Besford. I can see your point of view regarding price/value, but I just felt the need to post to point out to anybody who is unaware, that the price discrepancy that you refer to isn't actually that great (less than £10 for 4 excellent quality Eneloop batteries and a charger that can be used with many other devices - probably not much more than a fiver for a charger and 2 bog standard NiMH batteries) so although the price should be less, I don't think it's as big a difference as you imply. Also, I'm not saying that Panasonic cameras are not as good, I know from reputation that they are excellent, but it's not really fair to compare cameras based purely by spec, and if the many AA powered Canon cameras were poor value then surely this would have been picked up in some of the reviews on the internet. Sorry, this is a very poor analogy, but you could have a Kia and a Ford car with pretty much identical spec, and even similar performance, but the Ford is likely to be a nicer drive so worth the extra money.

The only problem that I have with AA powered cameras is the slow flash recharge time, to the extent that I would recommend a Li-ion powered camera over AA for somebody who was going to take a lot of flash photography.

Incidentally, I think this is an ok deal, but I have seen better and although I've been disagreeing with Besford on some points, I do think that Canon could do with reducing some of their normal prices as the competition seem to be pricing more aggressively, and although they are always very good quality it is unusual to see a Canon camera in the bargain £50-£60 price range.
#8
Mike73
Once again we're going to have to agree to disagree on this one Besford. I can see your point of view regarding price/value, but I just felt the need to post to point out to anybody who is unaware, that the price discrepancy that you refer to isn't actually that great (less than £10 for 4 excellent quality Eneloop batteries and a charger that can be used with many other devices - probably not much more than a fiver for a charger and 2 bog standard NiMH batteries) so although the price should be less, I don't think it's as big a difference as you imply. Also, I'm not saying that Panasonic cameras are not as good, I know from reputation that they are excellent, but it's not really fair to compare cameras based purely by spec, and if the many AA powered Canon cameras were poor value then surely this would have been picked up in some of the reviews on the internet. Sorry, this is a very poor analogy, but you could have a Kia and a Ford car with pretty much identical spec, and even similar performance, but the Ford is likely to be a nicer drive so worth the extra money.

The only problem that I have with AA powered cameras is the slow flash recharge time, to the extent that I would recommend a Li-ion powered camera over AA for somebody who was going to take a lot of flash photography.

Incidentally, I think this is an ok deal, but I have seen better and although I've been disagreeing with Besford on some points, I do think that Canon could do with reducing some of their normal prices as the competition seem to be pricing more aggressively, and although they are always very good quality it is unusual to see a Canon camera in the bargain £50-£60 price range.

As you said, we may have to agree to disagree (though I don't think our positions are actually that far apart).

However, your economics are flawed: it's not 10 quids' worth of (fat) aftermarket, AA batteries and their charger which are missing from the box - it's a proper Li-ion battery and dedicated charger which you'd have to add back in to give a genuine comparison.

If you bolted a set of Halfords alloys on that Kia would it then be better than the Ford? Didn't think so. Irrelevant though as I wasn't knocking the Canon as a camera - just the value.

You pays your money and makes your choice - this one's OK but no great bargain, regardless of claimed 'rrp'.
#9
Besford
As you said, we may have to agree to disagree (though I don't think our positions are actually that far apart).

However, your economics are flawed: it's not 10 quids' worth of (fat) aftermarket, AA batteries and their charger which are missing from the box - it's a proper Li-ion battery and dedicated charger which you'd have to add back in to give a genuine comparison.

If you bolted a set of Halfords alloys on that Kia would it then be better than the Ford? Didn't think so. Irrelevant though as I wasn't knocking the Canon as a camera - just the value.

You pays your money and makes your choice - this one's OK but no great bargain, regardless of claimed 'rrp'.


Once again we'll have to agree to disagree Besford, I don't see my economics as being flawed as I see that the extra expense is simply what is required to provide equivalent functionality to the Li-ion powered camera, that being to have a rechargeable camera capable of lasting for 300 plus shots. Whether they are directly comparable is open to discussion, but as we both know, there are pros and cons to both power sources so as you say you pays your money and makes your choice.

Having said all this, it makes a change to have been involved in a well-reasoned discussion without either of us resorting to petty comments and put-downs. Hopefully anybody who's read this thread will at least be aware of the differences and then be able to make their own mind up.

...AA's rule! :whistling:
#11


Which is great, IF you want a Li-ion powered camera. This is the only real problem I have with your comments, that you assume that everybody is better off with a Li-ion camera rather than AA powered. There are pros and cons to both, which I have tried to mention, whereas you tend to only concentrate on the pros of Li-ion and the cons of AA's. Surely people should be able to make their own minds up given all the information available.

I would never tell anybody to not buy a Li-ion powered camera just because I prefer AA's, because as we both know, some people prefer one power source to the other, I'd rather try and make sure that people got what THEY wanted.
#12
Mike73
Which is great, IF you want a Li-ion powered camera. This is the only real problem I have with your comments, that you assume that everybody is better off with a Li-ion camera rather than AA powered. There are pros and cons to both, which I have tried to mention, whereas you tend to only concentrate on the pros of Li-ion and the cons of AA's. Surely people should be able to make their own minds up given all the information available.

I would never tell anybody to not buy a Li-ion powered camera just because I prefer AA's, because as we both know, some people prefer one power source to the other, I'd rather try and make sure that people got what THEY wanted.

That point has already been agreed.

The issue is purely about VALUE - what you pay for what's in the box. Choose AA power by all means but don't pay more than a kit with Li-ion battery and charger also in the box.
#13
Besford
That point has already been agreed.

The issue is purely about VALUE - what you pay for what's in the box. Choose AA power by all means but don't pay more than a kit with Li-ion battery and charger also in the box.


But ignoring the power sources altogether, whose to say that the Canon camera isn't better and capable of better results than the other kit. Surely to compare the price and value of the 2 different power sources, you'd have to pick 2 internally equal cameras and then compare the price, that means two cameras from the same manufacturer. I've only had Canon digicams so I'm afraid I can only speak about them. The AA powered Powershots and Li-ion powered ixus cameras share a lot of the same internals (processor, lens, sensor) and so actually are capable of pretty much the same photos. Now admittedly the ixus range is better looking and arguably better made (although all of my powershot's have been very sturdy) but I think that you'd have to agree that like for like on the important things, an equivalent spec powershot is usually a good bit cheaper than an ixus.

I genuinely believe that with the powershot range you are getting the image quality of Canon's more expensive ranges, but at better value because you don't have to pay for the Li-ion battery and charger.

Anyway, I'm sure that neither of us is likely to change our minds, and I'm fairly sure that nobody else is bothering to read the thread anymore, so I think I probably should move on. Thanks for the discussion Besford, it's been fun, and prevented me from doing arguably more important things which I like to think is what these places are for!

Post a Comment

You don't need an account to leave a comment. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Top of Page
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!