Celestron Astromaster 130EQ Telescope £108.10 @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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Don't suppose there's much demand for telescopes really, but if you've always wanted to get one, then this is a great price for one. Everywhere else seems to be selling it at around £130+.

Product Features

* Quick and easy no-tool setup
* Permanently mounted StarPointer
* Erect image optics - Ideal for terrestrial and astronomical use
* German Equatorial mount with Setting circles - to accurately locate and track sky objects
* Rugged pre-assembled tripod with 1.25" steel tube legs - Provides a stable platform

Technical Details

OPTICAL DESIGN: Reflector
APERTURE: 130 mm (5.12 in)
FOCAL LENGTH: 650 mm (25.59 in)
FOCAL RATIO: 5
EYEPIECE 1: 20 mm (0.79 in)
MAGNIFICATION 1: 33 x
EYEPIECE 2: 10 mm (0.39 in)
MAGNIFICATION 2: 65 x
MOUNT: CG-3 Equatorial
OPTICAL COATINGS: Aluminum
WEIGHT: 28 lb (12.7 kg)
FINDERSCOPE: Built-on StarPointer
TUBE ATTACHMENT: Dovetail Bar
TRIPOD: 1.25" steel tube legs
CD ROM: The Sky L1
HIGHEST USEFUL MAGNIFICATION: 307 x
LIMITING STELLAR MAGNITUDE: 13.1
RESOLUTION (RAYLEIGH): 1.07 arcsec
RESOLUTION (DAWES): 0.89 arcsec
LIGHT GATHERING POWER: 345 x
ANGULAR FIELD OF VIEW: 1.5 °
LINEAR FIELD OF VIEW (@1000 YDS): 79 ft (24.08 m)
OPTICAL TUBE LENGTH: 24 in (609.6 mm)
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All Comments

(22) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
This is better than the toy scopes that have been posted in here recently, and it quotes sensible and informative specs.

However, "Ideal for terrestrial and astronomical use" is not true. This is a reflector on an equatorial mount- even with an erect image it is going to be awkward at best. The mount is designed to easily follow objects across the sky, and the eyepiece is at the upper end of the tube. You could use it terrestrially, but not "Ideal".
#2
Yup, a good basic scope from a known brand, and with two sensibly sized eyepieces as well (many basic scopes throw in a 6mm eyepiece, which is often overpowered).

Edit: I should add that basic doesn't mean bad/simple, its just a reflection (if you'll pardon the pun) of the wide range of telescopes, serious amateurs can spend more on a telescope and imaging equipment than most people would on a new hatchback car!

Edited By: MrT2 on Feb 07, 2011 11:55
#3
hi LongPockets, could you pls explain this You could use it terrestrially, but not "Ideal" i would like to get this for both sky and terrestrially. ie- day time when going for junggle treckking nightime for sky. Any advice pls? i know many reccoment dobs, but dobs would be difficult to take up outside?

LongPockets
This is better than the toy scopes that have been posted in here recently, and it quotes sensible and informative specs.

However, "Ideal for terrestrial and astronomical use" is not true. This is a reflector on an equatorial mount- even with an erect image it is going to be awkward at best. The mount is designed to easily follow objects across the sky, and the eyepiece is at the upper end of the tube. You could use it terrestrially, but not "Ideal".
#4
I thought these reflector telescopes gave you an upside down image, so would not be suitable for terrestrial. You would be better off with a refractor telescope.

But I could be mistaken.
2 Likes #5
shybeauty
hi LongPockets, could you pls explain this You could use it terrestrially, but not "Ideal"


It's just too big and clumsy for terrestrial use (especially to trek around with), and the mount is wrong. Equatorial mounts are designed to follow celestial objects as the earth rotates. The main axis of rotation is at the angle of the Earth's axis. It's a bit of a contortion to point the telescope level and pan around the scenery, although you could do it.

A Dobsonian mount is in principle more suited to terrestrial use as it is an alt-azimuth arrangement, but in practice Dobsonian scopes are seldom able to point as low as the horizon and you would have to be on your belly to look through the eyepiece (unless it was a small one set on a table).

If you want a scope to take around with you that is useful for both astro and terrestrial, you should look at a small catadioptric or Matsukov design. The original Questor changed a lot of people's minds about scopes because it was optically very good and still portable. You won't find one for this kind of price though.
2 Likes #6
pugw$sh
I thought these reflector telescopes gave you an upside down image, so would not be suitable for terrestrial. You would be better off with a refractor telescope.

But I could be mistaken.


Normally true, but you can fit an erecting eyepiece and this seems to have something of the sort (unless the specification is wrong). Anyhow, it isn't refractors vs reflectors, refractors made for astronomical use also normally show an inverted image. Astronomers don't care, so this kind of scope doesn't usually have the extra bits of glass needed to erect the image. These add aberrations and reflections, cutting down the light and contrast, so astronomers prefer to do without. However, a lot of refractor scopes are made specifically for terrestrial use and have erecting elements built in. It is the same with binoculars- they have an arrangement of prisms that fold the light path (making the binoculars more compact) and also erect the image by reflecting it four times at different angles.
#7
Thanks LongPockets, good advice there, i have searched through and find that this 130eq downside is mostly on the tripod which not strong enough, and its best use if you buy the barlow lens. which would come up to £150 range.

Lots of others on the astro forums do recommend dobsonian. I would like to get one for my dad who is in his 60's also my young sister who is starting to have interest on astronomy.

Between this 2, which you would recommend most skyliner 150P or astromaster 130eq.

thanks
#8
Which is best? This or the spotter scope from aldi?
#9
Can you get a polarising filter for this so you can see into nextdoor's windows?
#10
Awesome can keep an eye on what the neighbour is doing now ..

thanks
#11
Very Good Price for the spec - good deal indeed!
#12
Cyrus
Awesome can keep an eye on what the neighbour is doing now ..thanks

I hope your neighbour is a young, hot lady.........althought MILF is prefered :)
#13
I've got this telescope & love it.

I'm new to it & it was a xmas gift, so dont know that much yet but it's very sturdy & well built - mine has a motor drive too for the Equ. mount so if you only want to look at the stars it makes it easy.

I'll get something more for astrophotography if i end up using it enough, but for anyone who watched Stargazer Live in early Jan & fancied a go, this is a great piece of kit for just over a tonne delivered.
#14
Judosteffer
Which is best? This or the spotter scope from aldi?


There is only one way to settle it..................
1 Like #15
FIGHT
#16
Decent first scope. This is the one to buy your kids, especially if you have a garden and a view of the milky way at night.
#17
I got given one of these for a birthday present 18months ago. I was really suprised and pleased but then realised that you can't just use it to 'point and see' which is all I wanted to do really. However, it does take a bit of work. I ended up selling it to my old man who then also realised it would take some work so I bought it back off him and have done some reading since. I have to say that I now think it is great and from all i've read one of the best beginner scopes you can get. Be warned though if you are a photographer like me you might soon decide as I did that it is best for just looking at planets, nebulae etc rather than trying to photograph them.

The 10mm and 20mm lenses are fine but I'd upgrade the star finder to a telrad or somethign similar which really does completely change your experience and you can then use it as point and see'. I also bought a moon filter which I think is about a one stop ND filter and was worth the £8. I'm far from an expert but I'd have to say that this is a great telescope at a cracking price but be warned it does take patience, reading and a little more money to make full use.

Be warned it is big and is best used outside.
#18
Judosteffer
Which is best? This or the spotter scope from aldi?


depends on use - for astronomy a spotter scope wont cut it
#19
Can someone who has one of these post some links to some shots they have taken so we can see what can be seen through it (planets, nebula, moon, etc)?
#20
shaggydabbydo
Can someone who has one of these post some links to some shots they have taken so we can see what can be seen through it (planets, nebula, moon, etc)?


It doesn't work like that, I'm afraid.

A camera is so much more sensitive than your eyeballs so can capture more photons and give a brighter, more "contrasty" image. In any case, this mount isn't suitable for long exposure astrophotography and to a large extent neither is this scope - lacking amongst other things, a parabolic primary mirror. It is however a hot deal for a visual scope and mount. The equivalent Skywatcher 130P (on a more intuitive alt-az mount) is available from First Light Optics for around £130.

A camera also is unable to dynamically expose a picture so if you're looking at Jupiter and it's moons for instance you can either see the moons or Jupiter's banding but not both on the same picture unless you do a bit of Photoshopping.

Much better would be to look at sketches, and you can find plenty of comparable sketches of views through a scope like this in the book "Turn Left at Orion".

Edited By: liddlefeesh on Feb 07, 2011 21:20
#21
bought thanks
#22
*Sloman*
bought thanks


Good luck and enjoy the skies!

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