Coolermaster igreen 430w PSU £33.60 delivered after Google Checkout at ebuyer - HotUKDeals
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!This should be of particular interest if you are purchasing the 8800gts, it's power hungry!
This is a 430w PSU, with 38amps on the 12v rail(you will need at least 25 for the GTS alone) and a lifespan of 400,000 hours(about 45 years, lol). It also has a around 85% efficiency making it one of the most efficient PSUs around which may well save you money.
It also has dual pci-e connectors if you want to go SLI and complies to the atx 2.2 standard. Sleeved cables too which can help the airflow in your computer and keep temps down!

At 33.60 delivered it's a cracking price which you won't be able to match anywhere else so if your current PSU needs an upgrade you should consider it.
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HenvY Avatar
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#1
Spot on *nods* just one point to make:

Conclusion

The iGreen Power 430w power supply performs well. That pretty much covers it. I really can’t think of any cons, apart from there [COLOR="Red"]not being SLI PCI-e connectors[/COLOR] (i.e. two instead of one) but the next model up (iGreen Power 500w) provide not only more power but two PCI-e connectors (SLI). This gives you the option to pay more for SLI if you need it; smart choice by Coolermaster.

http://www.xsreviews.co.uk/reviews-57-page5.html

I'm pretty sure there's a way round that thought =)
#2
quackstar84
Spot on *nods* just one point to make:

Conclusion

The iGreen Power 430w power supply performs well. That pretty much covers it. I really can’t think of any cons, apart from there [COLOR="Red"]not being SLI PCI-e connectors[/COLOR] (i.e. two instead of one) but the next model up (iGreen Power 500w) provide not only more power but two PCI-e connectors (SLI). This gives you the option to pay more for SLI if you need it; smart choice by Coolermaster.

http://www.xsreviews.co.uk/reviews-57-page5.html

I'm pretty sure there's a way round that thought =)



yes there are cheap adators ect, but 420watts is probably too low for sli anyway



i would say however, this product is probably a wast for most users. a standard cheap £10 will be as good


it is slightly more effienct but you wount make that price up in its lifetime if you only use your pc for a few hours a day


but if your like me and have it on for nearly 24h a day, then it might pay for itself over the course of its lifetime
#3
cells
yes there are cheap adators ect, but 420watts is probably too low for sli anyway



i would say however, this product is probably a wast for most users. a standard cheap £10 will be as good


it is slightly more effienct but you wount make that price up in its lifetime if you only use your pc for a few hours a day


but if your like me and have it on for nearly 24h a day, then it might pay for itself over the course of its lifetime


No, a £10 PSU is not good for ANYBODY and cheap PSUs are probably the leading cause of system failures...and it might not just be the PSU that fries, it could very easily fry your whole system.
#4
quackstar84
Spot on *nods* just one point to make:

Conclusion

The iGreen Power 430w power supply performs well. That pretty much covers it. I really can’t think of any cons, apart from there [COLOR="Red"]not being SLI PCI-e connectors[/COLOR] (i.e. two instead of one) but the next model up (iGreen Power 500w) provide not only more power but two PCI-e connectors (SLI). This gives you the option to pay more for SLI if you need it; smart choice by Coolermaster.

http://www.xsreviews.co.uk/reviews-57-page5.html

I'm pretty sure there's a way round that thought =)


sorry, my mistake from it saying 'SLI ready' at bottom of ebuyer page..there is only 1 pci-e connector on this PSU. Even if you can get adapters, do NOT buy this PSU for SLI with the 8 series as there are only 2 12v rails at 19amps each which will not be enough for 2 8800gts'....the 500w has 3 12v rails though and will cover it perfectly.
#5
Cheap PSUs are a false economy. Just the trouble a dodgy PSU can cause is tremendous, and difficult to diagnose. And when they fail they take other components with them.

The deal PSU should not be used for SLI unless you are using light demand cards (like the 7600GT). Certainly not up to the new Gen 8 cards for SLI, and honestly I would recoomend something with a bit more 'oomph' for 1 Gen 8 card so that the PSU doesn't end up straining to meet power demand.
#6
robovski
The deal PSU should not be used for SLI unless you are using light demand cards (like the 7600GT). Certainly not up to the new Gen 8 cards for SLI, and honestly I would recoomend something with a bit more 'oomph' for 1 Gen 8 card so that the PSU doesn't end up straining to meet power demand.

Could you please explain the extra 'oomph' you are referring to which makes any other psu better than this one? This will not strain to meet the demands of an 8 series card in any circumstance, not even an 8800gtx OCed...
#7
Please check here to see which PSU's are SLI Certified:

http://www.slizone.com/object/slizone_build_psu.html

(For Dual GeForce 8800 GTS or Dual GeForce 7950 GX2)
#8
I bought a Coolermaster PSU recently - VERY noisy - and low on connectors but otherwise pretty good - Personally I prefer the Antec Truepower PSUs (very quiet and crazy amount of connectors) ;) just my 2 cents
1 Like #9
HenvY
Could you please explain the extra 'oomph' you are referring to which makes any other psu better than this one? This will not strain to meet the demands of an 8 series card in any circumstance, not even an 8800gtx OCed...


I wouldn't be comfortable with less than 450w for a single gen 8 card. Not when considering that there are so many other things in a build that will take power. Its not that you can run with the load, its more a matter of what is sustainable. Modern machines have multiple fans, multiple drives and power hungry vid cards and processors. When I hit peak demand, I want to know that I still have reserves in the PSU because I don't want to see a power fluctuation or start having problems 6 months later from extensive gaming.

But that's just me. I'm a conservative builder who wants to use parts again for future builds and be able to do upgrades without worry. I will also say that I have considered this PSU in the past (went with the Hiper Type-R 580W when I built my last machine in October) and it seems a good PSU - I have nothing against the deal. It just doesn't have a future for 'main builds' - and the future holds increasing power demands. Maybe you can use it in a file server or media centre or something down the line - if it hasn't been stressed.
#10
robovski
I wouldn't be comfortable with less than 450w for a single gen 8 card. Not when considering that there are so many other things in a build that will take power. Its not that you can run with the load, its more a matter of what is sustainable. Modern machines have multiple fans, multiple drives and power hungry vid cards and processors. When I hit peak demand, I want to know that I still have reserves in the PSU because I don't want to see a power fluctuation or start having problems 6 months later from extensive gaming.

But that's just me. I'm a conservative builder who wants to use parts again for future builds and be able to do upgrades without worry. I will also say that I have considered this PSU in the past (went with the Hiper Type-R 580W when I built my last machine in October) and it seems a good PSU - I have nothing against the deal. It just doesn't have a future for 'main builds' - and the future holds increasing power demands. Maybe you can use it in a file server or media centre or something down the line - if it hasn't been stressed.


I would not recommend anyone buying a "cheap Power Supply" I have a Corsair 620 running sli without problems, please look at http://www.extreme.outervision.com/index.jsp, to check your needs!:)
#11
400W with 26A recommended for 8800gts and 450w with 30A for 8800GTX. If you have a demanding system, i.e. quad core processor you MAY need a couple more Amps on the 12v rail/s.

For SLI setups, the requirements are significantly higher (around 650w with 40A for 8800gtx SLI depending on the exact system setup). However, if you are building such an expensive PC yourself, you will probably have the knowledge needed for that anyway.

edit: all the Amperage ratings im talking about are for the 12v rail/s.
#12
HenvY
No, a £10 PSU is not good for ANYBODY and cheap PSUs are probably the leading cause of system failures...and it might not just be the PSU that fries, it could very easily fry your whole system.


i have never had any problems with cheap power supplies, i have been using self built computers for a good 5 years now, no psu has cost me over £10 and they are all fine



my current computer has some ebuyer extra value one, cost me £10. it is running an OC e6300, 8800gtx, ds3 mobo, 2gigs geli ram, HD, DVD-rw

it is on near enough 24h a day, stable, no problems



when people post some **** computer specs and include a £80 PSU i sigh and think that money would be much better spent on components ect
#13
Maybe you're just lucky cells?
Thats just hard for me to believe, as mentioned cheap power supplys are always false economy in my experience.
#14
robovski
I wouldn't be comfortable with less than 450w for a single gen 8 card. Not when considering that there are so many other things in a build that will take power. Its not that you can run with the load, its more a matter of what is sustainable. Modern machines have multiple fans, multiple drives and power hungry vid cards and processors. When I hit peak demand, I want to know that I still have reserves in the PSU because I don't want to see a power fluctuation or start having problems 6 months later from extensive gaming.

But that's just me. I'm a conservative builder who wants to use parts again for future builds and be able to do upgrades without worry. I will also say that I have considered this PSU in the past (went with the Hiper Type-R 580W when I built my last machine in October) and it seems a good PSU - I have nothing against the deal. It just doesn't have a future for 'main builds' - and the future holds increasing power demands. Maybe you can use it in a file server or media centre or something down the line - if it hasn't been stressed.


This psu has a 500w peak anyway, but this is still going to be enough for everything except incredibly powerful systems with a single card...

Also, the Type-R is a poor power supply which has recieved very bad ratings...it was known to consistantly fail around the 12 month mark. Nvidia reccomends 450w for two 8 series cards in SLi....

Also, as a trend power consumption for many parts will go down as the manufacturing processes change from 90nm to 60nm and 45nm.
#15
cells
i have never had any problems with cheap power supplies, i have been using self built computers for a good 5 years now, no psu has cost me over £10 and they are all fine



my current computer has some ebuyer extra value one, cost me £10. it is running an OC e6300, 8800gtx, ds3 mobo, 2gigs geli ram, HD, DVD-rw

it is on near enough 24h a day, stable, no problems



when people post some ***** computer specs and include a £80 PSU i sigh and think that money would be much better spent on components ect

whether you like it or not your whole system is at risk. If you continue to use cheap, poorly built PSUs one day you WILL have a fail and then you will never buy one again...it is not a rare thing to happen.
#16
vims
Maybe you're just lucky cells?
Thats just hard for me to believe, as mentioned cheap power supplys are always false economy in my experience.



well, i have 3 PCs at home, all cheap psu, no problem with any of them. have had 2 for over 4 years, and one for 6months.


i also really don’t think a PSU problem would damage anything apart from the PSU, surely the engineers are smart enough to design safety features like fuses, capacitors, grounded wires ect to limit any dmg the mobo takes
#17
HenvY
whether you like it or not your whole system is at risk. If you continue to use cheap, poorly built PSUs one day you WILL have a fail and then you will never buy one again...it is not a rare thing to happen.

maybe, but i can potentially buy 5x cheap psu for the price of 1x decent psu


also, as a hot uk deals member, you should know there is a difference between a value for money product and a cheap product. the value for money product means the manufacturers usually make less profit. doesn’t necessarily mean that it is a crap product
#18
cells
well, i have 3 PCs at home, all cheap psu, no problem with any of them. have had 2 for over 4 years, and one for 6months.


i also really don’t think a PSU problem would damage anything apart from the PSU, surely the engineers are smart enough to design safety features like fuses, capacitors, grounded wires ect to limit any dmg the mobo takes

http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=1720
30% of dead PCS are a result of PSU issues...
#19
cells
maybe, but i can potentially buy 5x cheap psu for the price of 1x decent psu


also, as a hot uk deals member, you should know there is a difference between a value for money product and a cheap product. the value for money product means the manufacturers usually make less profit. doesn’t necessarily mean that it is a crap product

yes, but low-cost PSUs are all cheap prodcuts. You seem to be the only one resisting that fact. I don't know why you would spends thousands on PC componenets then put something that is the equivalent of a blind cab-driver in charge of them...
#20
cells
i have never had any problems with cheap power supplies, i have been using self built computers for a good 5 years now, no psu has cost me over £10 and they are all fine

my current computer has some ebuyer extra value one, cost me £10. it is running an OC e6300, 8800gtx, ds3 mobo, 2gigs geli ram, HD, DVD-rw


It's certainly not something to reccomend, if thats your setup, i'm amazed you'd actually risk all that money spent on those components by taking a cheaper route with the most important part.

You may get lucky and end up with a great £10 PSU that lasts a while, but they're usually very poor and quite risky if you've spent a good amount of money on other components.

Buying an £80 PSU really isn't necessary for most people, you can pick up decent enough PSU's for less than £50 and be safe with the knowledge that you havent just thrown some cheap component in to save on costs.
#21
HenvY
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=1720
30% of dead PCS are a result of PSU issues...




let me guess, those statistics are from a PSU manufacturer



my piano tuner guy suggests i get it tuned at lest once every 3 months, would he really say only do it once every year? it is his job to tune pianos so he bends the truth :giggle: :giggle:


all i can say is, i have never had any probs with cheap psu
#22
blaze
It's certainly not something to reccomend, if thats your setup, i'm amazed you'd actually risk all that money spent on those components by taking a cheaper route with the most important part.

You may get lucky and end up with a great £10 PSU that lasts a while, but they're usually very poor and quite risky if you've spent a good amount of money on other components.

Buying an £80 PSU really isn't necessary for most people, you can pick up decent enough PSU's for less than £50 and be safe with the knowledge that you havent just thrown some cheap component in to save on costs.



like i said, i have never had any problems with cheap psu. although i know that most psu problems are caused by turning on/off the pc. i usually only reboot once a week so that might be why my psu's have no problems generally


also what in a cheap psu is different in an expensive psu that makes it break down more? only thing i can think of is construction quality.
#23
cells
let me guess, those statistics are from a PSU manufacturer



my piano tuner guy suggests i get it tuned at lest once every 3 months, would he really say only do it once every year? it is his job to tune pianos so he bends the truth :giggle: :giggle:


all i can say is, i have never had any probs with cheap psu

they weren't, can't you read?
Forget what everyone said, you can carry on using those POS...good luck.
#24
HenvY
they weren't, can't you read?
Forget what everyone said, you can carry on using those POS...good luck.




never trust any statistics that do not reference their data
#25
cells
never trust any statistics that do not reference their data

LMAO, they do...:roll:
#26
Lombear
I bought a Coolermaster PSU recently - VERY noisy - and low on connectors but otherwise pretty good - Personally I prefer the Antec Truepower PSUs (very quiet and crazy amount of connectors) ;) just my 2 cents


Have to agree, I have the blue light version of this and it is quite noisy even though they state 'Super silent operation' !

Works great though but Im sure theres quieter ones out there for a similar price?
#27
HenvY
LMAO, they do...:roll:


no they dont, what they say is


"Faulty power supplies are by far and away the most common source of computer mortality. In our reader survey, power issues accounted for over 30% of all dead-PC tales, and after working in a computer store for a few years I'm surprised it wasn't actually higher."


so basically, they did a survey on what is the no 1 cause of a computer failure. and 30% according to them said psu. sure i believe them whole heartedly.

then he goes onto say it was the same when he worked in a computer store, so you think he would rather sell cheap low margin PSU or a high margin expensive one?
#28
cells
no they dont, what they say is


"Faulty power supplies are by far and away the most common source of computer mortality. In our reader survey, power issues accounted for over 30% of all dead-PC tales, and after working in a computer store for a few years I'm surprised it wasn't actually higher."


so basically, they did a survey on what is the no 1 cause of a computer failure. and 30% according to them said psu. sure i believe them whole heartedly.

then he goes onto say it was the same when he worked in a computer store, so you think he would rather sell cheap low margin PSU or a high margin expensive one?


Look mate, it's clear you aren't very intelligent but seriously, do you think the reader survery was 'what do you think is the leading cause of failure'? No, if you had read it properly, you would see that they asked what the cause of their PC failures were in the past and compiled the data. The reference to the computer shop clearly implies he worked in repairs. As he'd be getting paid a wage, I honestly don't think he'd care what product he did sell if he was even selling anything...
#29
cells
also what in a cheap psu is different in an expensive psu that makes it break down more? only thing i can think of is construction quality.


Same as with all electronics, a large number of things:

Quality of capacitors
Quality of fan (particularly bearing and heat-resistance)
Choice of the torroids, transistors and power-regulator ICs
Size, quality of heatsinks and thermal interface
Lack of protection circuits - temperature, current overload, current underload, short circuit
Reliability of statistics on label
Quality of regulation circuits
Quality of cabling (some cheap high-power supplies have cables far too thin for the rated current)

And then there are the general construction, testing and quality-control differences. Some cheap power supplies can be quite good, but the cost and quality of the PSU really should match that of the other components. Don't risk frying your GTXs, deluxe-SLI motherboard and DDR2-10000 ram or whatever with a £10 pos-psu.


Almost forgot, nice price OP! If you want a SLI certified one http://www.ebuyer.com/UK/product/112899 looks decent value at £41.60 (Hiper 530W - probably not quite as efficient as the Coolermaster though)
#30
Cells, you're right.

Henvy and Blaze, I assume you're relaying what you've been told on other forums. Guys, the problem there is, people on forums are, 99% of the time, only relaying what they've heard, also on forums, and much like Chinese Whispers, the truth gets lost along the way. Fact is, cheap PSUs are fine, and everything the people that tell you about expensive PSUs is scaremongering bullshit.


That PC Stats article you link to there is bogus. Check it out - that PSU failure stat jumps from 26% in the list, to "over 30%" in the article. That's bias and exaggeration. The stat itself fails to distinguish between PSU and external power issues, and does not make any reference to whether those failed systems packed branded or name-branded PSUs, so it's completely invalid.

The author then goes on to write "When a power supply fails, it often sends random jolts through the rest of the system, killing (and sometimes burning) your valuable computer components", which simply isn't true. It can potentially kill other parts, certainly (although the same holds true for anything electrical in your system, even your cooling fans), but 'often' killing other parts?

I'm a level 2 tech at Dell. I've seen hundreds of systems with blown PSUs. D'you know how many systems have had DIMMs that have been blown by a failed PSU, something the author says is "typical"? Zero. Blown hard disks, CPUs, optical drives? Zero. Blown motherboads? A couple. Literally, a couple. So, that's what, 1% or so of the time that a blown PSU takes out another component? Not really something to worry about.

If you get a faulty PSU, either branded or name-branded, you're going to have trouble. But the vast majority of PSUs manufactured are solid and reliable units. The main difference between a £10 and a £50 PSU is the badge. That £50 doesn't buy a better quality PSU. It pays for the advertising costs, the packaging, polishing the edges, and the rest is profit.

Companies are well aware that by overpricing a product, they can dupe people into believing it's of a higher quality than a cheaper model. That's all it is.
#31
dxx
Cells, you're right.

Henvy and Blaze, I assume you're relaying what you've been told on other forums. Guys, the problem there is, people on forums are, 99% of the time, only relaying what they've heard, also on forums, and much like Chinese Whispers, the truth gets lost along the way. Fact is, cheap PSUs are fine, and everything the people that tell you about expensive PSUs is scaremongering bullshit.


That PC Stats article you link to there is bogus. Check it out - that PSU failure stat jumps from 26% in the list, to "over 30%" in the article. That's bias and exaggeration. The stat itself fails to distinguish between PSU and external power issues, and does not make any reference to whether those failed systems packed branded or name-branded PSUs, so it's completely invalid.

The author then goes on to write "When a power supply fails, it often sends random jolts through the rest of the system, killing (and sometimes burning) your valuable computer components", which simply isn't true. It can potentially kill other parts, certainly (although the same holds true for anything electrical in your system, even your cooling fans), but 'often' killing other parts?

I'm a level 2 tech at Dell. I've seen hundreds of systems with blown PSUs. D'you know how many systems have had DIMMs that have been blown by a failed PSU, something the author says is "typical"? Zero. Blown hard disks, CPUs, optical drives? Zero. Blown motherboads? A couple. Literally, a couple. So, that's what, 1% or so of the time that a blown PSU takes out another component? Not really something to worry about.

If you get a faulty PSU, either branded or name-branded, you're going to have trouble. But the vast majority of PSUs manufactured are solid and reliable units. The main difference between a £10 and a £50 PSU is the badge. That £50 doesn't buy a better quality PSU. It pays for the advertising costs, the packaging, polishing the edges, and the rest is profit.

Companies are well aware that by overpricing a product, they can dupe people into believing it's of a higher quality than a cheaper model. That's all it is.


What brand of PSU do dell use?
#32
cells
yes there are cheap adators ect, but 420watts is probably too low for sli anyway


Quite right Sli would struggle with this.....just the one card then ur ok but Sli makes for a cheap upgrade laters on in life when the same card will be very cheap.
#33
HenvY
What brand of PSU do dell use?


We don't use branded PSUs (not here in the business side of the company, anyway - I can't talk for the home or XPS lines), and just go with whichever manufacturer offers us the best prices on the parts that meet our specs.

I don't know what our PSU failure rates are, although I gather they're pretty low. I'll try and find some stats this week (if I'm left alone long enough... ).
#34
HenvY
This psu has a 500w peak anyway, but this is still going to be enough for everything except incredibly powerful systems with a single card...

Also, the Type-R is a poor power supply which has recieved very bad ratings...it was known to consistantly fail around the 12 month mark. Nvidia reccomends 450w for two 8 series cards in SLi....

Also, as a trend power consumption for many parts will go down as the manufacturing processes change from 90nm to 60nm and 45nm.


450W was the SLI rating before the 8800 gen cards came onto the market. It is ok for a single 8800gtx card with x6800.

Take for example BFG's recommendation here

http://www2.bfgtech.com/bfgr88768gtxe.aspx

Look at detailed specs.
#35
dxx
We don't use branded PSUs (not here in the business side of the company, anyway - I can't talk for the home or XPS lines), and just go with whichever manufacturer offers us the best prices on the parts that meet our specs.

I don't know what our PSU failure rates are, although I gather they're pretty low. I'll try and find some stats this week (if I'm left alone long enough... ).


Dell tend to use cheapest parts for everything. Where I work we've had so many Dell motherboard faults its unbelievable.
#36
Lombear
I bought a Coolermaster PSU recently - VERY noisy - and low on connectors but otherwise pretty good - Personally I prefer the Antec Truepower PSUs (very quiet and crazy amount of connectors) ;) just my 2 cents

My Antec truepower PSU from nearly 4 years ago is drying up. The voltages on it are poor and it's affecting my system stability. It is a 550 watt one too so has plenty of power for my system. I wouldn't buy antec again.
#37
dxx
Cells, you're right.

Henvy and Blaze, I assume you're relaying what you've been told on other forums. Guys, the problem there is, people on forums are, 99% of the time, only relaying what they've heard, also on forums, and much like Chinese Whispers, the truth gets lost along the way. Fact is, cheap PSUs are fine, and everything the people that tell you about expensive PSUs is scaremongering bullshit.


That PC Stats article you link to there is bogus. Check it out - that PSU failure stat jumps from 26% in the list, to "over 30%" in the article. That's bias and exaggeration. The stat itself fails to distinguish between PSU and external power issues, and does not make any reference to whether those failed systems packed branded or name-branded PSUs, so it's completely invalid.

The author then goes on to write "When a power supply fails, it often sends random jolts through the rest of the system, killing (and sometimes burning) your valuable computer components", which simply isn't true. It can potentially kill other parts, certainly (although the same holds true for anything electrical in your system, even your cooling fans), but 'often' killing other parts?

I'm a level 2 tech at Dell. I've seen hundreds of systems with blown PSUs. D'you know how many systems have had DIMMs that have been blown by a failed PSU, something the author says is "typical"? Zero. Blown hard disks, CPUs, optical drives? Zero. Blown motherboads? A couple. Literally, a couple. So, that's what, 1% or so of the time that a blown PSU takes out another component? Not really something to worry about.

If you get a faulty PSU, either branded or name-branded, you're going to have trouble. But the vast majority of PSUs manufactured are solid and reliable units. The main difference between a £10 and a £50 PSU is the badge. That £50 doesn't buy a better quality PSU. It pays for the advertising costs, the packaging, polishing the edges, and the rest is profit.

Companies are well aware that by overpricing a product, they can dupe people into believing it's of a higher quality than a cheaper model. That's all it is.


Hey dxx, just wondering if you know about the PSU from the Dell E520?? why doesn't it come with any 4-pin molex connector?? the p10 connector is missing as compared with the online manual for this PSU.

Any idea why? and what can be done?? because I need a molex connection in order connect my graphics card.

also do you know if it can power a sapphire x1950pro graphics card??

Thanks a lot.
#38
55 - Dell and other similar manufacturers generally have custom power supplies and motherboards. This used to be a real pain as they didn't use standard ATX motherboard connectors etc or a standard size, but I think more recently they use standard size and connectors, but they just have the bare minimal amount. I'm not certain but I think the system is all SATA (both HD and DVD) and they have effectively dispensed with the standard molex power connectors. The 1950 is a high-end card (in terms of power consumption) and I personally doubt the Dell psu is really designed for the added 12V load this will present - you'd either want a card than card be powered directly from the PCI-E bus (no additional connectors), or an uprated power supply such as this one.

Many people have succeeded in using your supply to power such a card, but common sense dictates that Dell have only intended for use with lower power cards and the extra draw will make it run the edge. I can't guarantee this PSU will be compatable as I don't have the Dell system but I'm sure someone else will confirm whether or not the supplied PSU can be upgraded to a standard ATX2 PSU such as this one.
#39
jah128
55 - Dell and other similar manufacturers generally have custom power supplies and motherboards. This used to be a real pain as they didn't use standard ATX motherboard connectors etc or a standard size, but I think more recently they use standard size and connectors, but they just have the bare minimal amount. I'm not certain but I think the system is all SATA (both HD and DVD) and they have effectively dispensed with the standard molex power connectors. The 1950 is a high-end card (in terms of power consumption) and I personally doubt the Dell psu is really designed for the added 12V load this will present - you'd either want a card than card be powered directly from the PCI-E bus (no additional connectors), or an uprated power supply such as this one.

Many people have succeeded in using your supply to power such a card, but common sense dictates that Dell have only intended for use with lower power cards and the extra draw will make it run the edge. I can't guarantee this PSU will be compatable as I don't have the Dell system but I'm sure someone else will confirm whether or not the supplied PSU can be upgraded to a standard ATX2 PSU such as this one.



the 305w Dell psu will run fine with x1950pro, the fact is, i have seen other users with an even lower powered PSU 250w etc, that is running x1950pro without any problem at all.
#40
dxx


That PC Stats article you link to there is bogus.
The author then goes on to write "When a power supply fails, it often sends random jolts through the rest of the system, killing (and sometimes burning) your valuable computer components", which simply isn't true. It can potentially kill other parts, certainly, but 'often' killing other parts?


I'd go along with that. If a PSU fails it is normally just the PSU that fails which is why they have protection in them to stop em causing havoc. It is only on occasion that a PSU will damage some other part from outside it's workings. Normally when it has a slow death.



I'm a level 2 tech at Dell. I've seen hundreds of systems with blown PSUs. D'you know how many systems have had DIMMs that have been blown by a failed PSU, something the author says is "typical"? Zero. Blown hard disks, CPUs, optical drives? Zero. Blown motherboads? A couple. Literally, a couple. So, that's what, 1% or so of the time that a blown PSU takes out another component? Not really something to worry about.


When I used to get involved in pc repairs which included quite a few Dell units I believe I only came across 2 units that a PSU caused other damage. 1 to a mainboard & 1 to a CPU.



The vast majority of PSUs manufactured are solid and reliable units. The main difference between a £10 and a £50 PSU is the badge. That £50 doesn't buy a better quality PSU. It pays for the advertising costs, the packaging, polishing the edges, and the rest is profit.


I would be inclined to disagree a little here. Admittedly the "cheap" psu's are so because they are made in very cheap labour countries from "stock" parts & design which doesn't neccassarily make them bad but they do lack some innovation in design & probably use lesser spec'd components which ultimately rears it's head in poorer voltage rail stability (especially under load), more electrical noise & lower overheads. While these would work perfectly well in an under stressed system they might start to suffer (more) when the going gets tougher. I particularly find the fans in cheap PSU's the biggest problem, they give up the ghost which in turn has the knock on affect of a dying PSU (overheating).

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