Create a Lasting Power of Attorney online was £110 now £82. Free for some! @ GOV.UK - HotUKDeals
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Create a Lasting Power of Attorney online was £110 now £82.00. Free for some! @ GOV.UK

£82.00 @ GOV.UK
"A lasting power of attorney (LPA) is a legal document that lets you (the 'donor') choose trusted people ('attorneys') to make decisions on your behalf. An LPA is mainly used if you don't have the … Read More
Armenia Avatar
3d, 23h agoFound 3 days, 23 hours ago
"A lasting power of attorney (LPA) is a legal document that lets you (the 'donor') choose trusted people ('attorneys') to make decisions on your behalf.

An LPA is mainly used if you don't have the mental capacity to make decisions yourself"

This is the official government tool for creating a Lasting Power of Attorney, I helped my grandparents to create one and found the service really easy to use, no need to use a solicitor who charge a fortune for this.

Was £110 to register, but they've dropped the price to £82 and I believe you can get it for half price or even free if you receive benefits.

Well worth having to protect your finances and appoint someone to look after your affairs if you can't.
Armenia Avatar
3d, 23h agoFound 3 days, 23 hours ago
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Top Comments

(3)
9 Likes
imiskeen
I urge all parties involved to think very carefully before agreeing to sign one of these. One "online" step too far in my opinion. Sorry. :(

On the other hand, if you find yourself in a situation where decisions need to made on your behalf, would you rather it was your choice or a random stranger?

Also worth noting that if you don't have an LPA in place when needed, then your relative will have to apply to become a Deputy instead. An altogether much more expensive process & subject to ongoing audit fees as well.
7 Likes
I am a Paralegal in a firm of Solicitors. I have set up 3 of these LPAs now for different relatives. On the first LPA I spoke to one of my colleagues in the Family Law department to get some tips, but to be honest, as long as you follow the instructions on the website TO THE LETTER (the most important being getting the LPA co-signed by a professional to confirm the donor has the appropriate mental capacity (i.e that the donor understands the purpose of the LPA and what it is for), that professional usually being the subject's GP (which some Doctors charge a fee for))) it is quite easy. You can do it in stages and save the form as you go. A Solicitor will charge quite a lot of money, but that is because there is a risk involved to them as they would usually attest to the subject's mental capacity. As they are not medical practitioners there is a small chance their decision could be challenged and they could then be open to litigation.
6 Likes
Did this to take care of my dads affairs last year. It's a waste of money using a solicitor.
The form is simply names and addresses to fill out, signatures to be done and witnessed. That's it.
There's even a feature on the website which uses previously entered details so you don't have to fill things out multiple times with the same details.

However, using the LPA is the hard part. Some banks make it difficult. Some are easy. Some are just unclear/confusing. Luckily the first one i did for my dads current account to pay his home care fees was easy. Barclays - you make an appointment at the branch, fill out a form, show them the LPA and some ID. Then 10 days later you are set up for Telephone banking and shortly after internet banking.

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4 Likes #1
Thanks for this - my elderly mother has only her state pension with Pension Guarantee Credit, and on following your link and reading further it seems we can apply for a lasting power of attorney for free in her circumstances.
1 Like #2
Thanks OP - had been thinking of doing this.
What would be the benefit of doing this online versus doing it at a solicitors?
#3
BigAde
Thanks OP - had been thinking of doing this.
What would be the benefit of doing this online versus doing it at a solicitors?


Think you will need to pay extra for solicitors ... online is just the cost of the process itself (£82)
2 Likes #4
BigAde
Thanks OP - had been thinking of doing this.
What would be the benefit of doing this online versus doing it at a solicitors?

This is a good guide and seems to answer the main questions I had...
http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/family/power-of-attorney
2 Likes #5
Didnt know you can do this, Thought it was through solicitors, Thank you
4 Likes #6
Thanks a lot had no idea about this, my mum was just about to appoint a solicitor charging £1200 to do this!
3 Likes #7
Nice one OP. It just goes to show you not everyone knows about things like this. Places like HUKD are excellent for making people aware of this. Thank you
3 Likes #8
I did ours in January so missed out on this excellent deal. Who would have thought that the price would go down? Still, best not to delay and as I consider it to be essential it should be even cheaper. Easy to do, you just need to be methodical and work your way through the online application or alternatively, print the forms out.
Bear in mind it can take up to 12 weeks for the paperwork to be processed so best get started as soon as possible.
Also you do need to print the forms and get them signed to be sent off so you will need access to a printer.
Absolutely no need to use a solicitor and pay more unless you're not confident at form filling.

Well posted and heat added.
1 Like #9
Does this require any involvement from a solicitor as I notice the form has sections for solicitors ?
6 Likes #10
Did this to take care of my dads affairs last year. It's a waste of money using a solicitor.
The form is simply names and addresses to fill out, signatures to be done and witnessed. That's it.
There's even a feature on the website which uses previously entered details so you don't have to fill things out multiple times with the same details.

However, using the LPA is the hard part. Some banks make it difficult. Some are easy. Some are just unclear/confusing. Luckily the first one i did for my dads current account to pay his home care fees was easy. Barclays - you make an appointment at the branch, fill out a form, show them the LPA and some ID. Then 10 days later you are set up for Telephone banking and shortly after internet banking.
7 Likes #11
I am a Paralegal in a firm of Solicitors. I have set up 3 of these LPAs now for different relatives. On the first LPA I spoke to one of my colleagues in the Family Law department to get some tips, but to be honest, as long as you follow the instructions on the website TO THE LETTER (the most important being getting the LPA co-signed by a professional to confirm the donor has the appropriate mental capacity (i.e that the donor understands the purpose of the LPA and what it is for), that professional usually being the subject's GP (which some Doctors charge a fee for))) it is quite easy. You can do it in stages and save the form as you go. A Solicitor will charge quite a lot of money, but that is because there is a risk involved to them as they would usually attest to the subject's mental capacity. As they are not medical practitioners there is a small chance their decision could be challenged and they could then be open to litigation.
2 Likes #12
I have just completed two LPA's for myself and wife from the government web site printed off and ready for signing. The forms and process is the most simple I have had on line advice every step of the way. If everything straight forward I feel no need for a solictor
1 Like #13
Does it need a professional such as a GP to sign, or just someone (not in the family) who has known them for at least 2 years ?
2 Likes #14
Chewystu
I am a Paralegal in a firm of Solicitors. I have set up 3 of these LPAs now for different relatives. On the first LPA I spoke to one of my colleagues in the Family Law department to get some tips, but to be honest, as long as you follow the instructions on the website TO THE LETTER (the most important being getting the LPA co-signed by a professional to confirm the donor has the appropriate mental capacity (i.e that the donor understands the purpose of the LPA and what it is for), that professional usually being the subject's GP (which some Doctors charge a fee for))) it is quite easy. You can do it in stages and save the form as you go. A Solicitor will charge quite a lot of money, but that is because there is a risk involved to them as they would usually attest to the subject's mental capacity. As they are not medical practitioners there is a small chance their decision could be challenged and they could then be open to litigation.
Just read the LPA again the certificate provider can be some one who has known the Doner personally for at least two years such as friend,neighbour or colleague.As my wife and I are fit and healthy I am comfortable with a friend siging
#15
Don't you need to do one for money matters and one for health matters? Per person?
So for a couple, its 4x?

Spending £80-100 would be "okay" - but 4x that is a lot more.

Also, what about future amendments, eg if you change people on the form, is that free or another cost?

With no kids or close family, and friends of roughly same age, not sure who we'd use anyway!
1 Like #16
happymanuk
Does it need a professional such as a GP to sign, or just someone (not in the family) who has known them for at least 2 years ?
Can be either but we just used our family friend to be the certificate provider
2 Likes #17
MrMarmite
Don't you need to do one for money matters and one for health matters? Per person?
So for a couple, its 4x?

Spending £80-100 would be "okay" - but 4x that is a lot more.

Also, what about future amendments, eg if you change people on the form, is that free or another cost?

With no kids or close family, and friends of roughly same age, not sure who we'd
[quote=happymanuk]Does this require any involvement from a solicitor as I notice the form has sections for solicitors ?

Doesn't need a solicitor but I think they tell you that in case you have particularly complicated affairs that need specialist advice.
#18
LOL
#19
fantastic deal.
#20
If you set up a lasting power of attorney and then change your address - such as move into a nursing home do you then need to pay again to update it ?
1 Like #21
Just a guess, but I would imagine you would need to do a whole new LPA if anything substantial changed. I haven't come across that situation with any of my family members yet. And yes, it is that fee per person per LPA (money and medical), so for a couple that is 4 times the fee.
#22
happymanuk
If you set up a lasting power of attorney and then change your address - such as move into a nursing home do you then need to pay again to update it ?

Just need to write in and tell them, it doesn't update the LPA itself just the details on file.

Edited By: Armenia on Apr 19, 2017 12:34
1 Like #23
my wife is a power of attorney for her grandmother - when she eventually passes on - who has control of her bank account - i heard the power of attorney right is dissolved after death? am i correct ?
1 Like #24
Thanks OP
#25
misterboumsong
my wife is a power of attorney for her grandmother - when she eventually passes on - who has control of her bank account - i heard the power of attorney right is dissolved after death? am i correct ?

Yes that is correct....upon death the LPA lapses.
1 Like #26
Armenia
happymanuk
If you set up a lasting power of attorney and then change your address - such as move into a nursing home do you then need to pay again to update it ?
Just need to write in and tell them, it doesn't update the LPA itself just the details on file.

Thank you.

At the moment our family relative has moved out of his home into a nursing home. Post is currently re-directed by Royal Mail from his home to our address.

I'm not sure whether it would be acceptable to put our address on the form, as he does not want the nursing home to receive any correspondence for him. Anyone have any experience of this ?
#27
Armenia
MrMarmite
Don't you need to do one for money matters and one for health matters? Per person?
So for a couple, its 4x?

Spending £80-100 would be "okay" - but 4x that is a lot more.

Also, what about future amendments, eg if you change people on the form, is that free or another cost?

With no kids or close family, and friends of roughly same age, not sure who we'd
[quote=happymanuk]Does this require any involvement from a solicitor as I notice the form has sections for solicitors ?
Doesn't need a solicitor but I think they tell you that in case you have particularly complicated affairs that need specialist advice.

You could use your solicitor (if you have known him/her for over 2 years) to act as the certificate provider as well.
4 Likes #28
My understanding was that you should fully complete an LPA for money matters and for health matters for each person so 4 x fees for two people. The cost is only applicable upon registration so the fully completed and FULLY CHECKED forms could be kept safe until (or IF) they are required.

The advantage of this is that payment will only be made IF the person has lost mental capacity. BUT if there are any errors in the forms in this case then it would be impossible to put right as the person could not be certified as 'of sound mind'. Also the registration fees may have increased in the intervening years.
1 Like #29
happymanuk
Armenia
happymanuk
If you set up a lasting power of attorney and then change your address - such as move into a nursing home do you then need to pay again to update it ?
Just need to write in and tell them, it doesn't update the LPA itself just the details on file.
Thank you.
At the moment our family relative has moved out of his home into a nursing home. Post is currently re-directed by Royal Mail from his home to our address.
I'm not sure whether it would be acceptable to put our address on the form, as he does not want the nursing home to receive any correspondence for him. Anyone have any experience of this ?
The government web site has telephone help line and e mail enquiry form from my experience prompt replies
4 Likes #30
haritori
DanB89
Glad you have thanked your source (MSE) for this... oh wait...
What like Martin Lewis, thanks all of the members of HUKD or MSE for the deals he spouts on This Morning or some other ITV show?

Best to not thank Martin Lewis's ego for most things he says, better to thank the unpaid people on his forum where he seems to have gotten a lot of his advice from over the years.

Just as well he owns the copyright to his website, or rather I think MoneySuperMarket do after he sold his soul to them.


Edited By: supermann on Apr 19, 2017 12:54
3 Likes #31
Don't forget that when it is time to use the LPA. Don't ever send the original to any bank, investment company etc. Pop down to a local solicitor and ask for some certified copies. If the original is lost its a pain and costs to get a copy.
Some solicitors will only charge £5 per certified copy.
1 Like #32
misterboumsong
my wife is a power of attorney for her grandmother - when she eventually passes on - who has control of her bank account - i heard the power of attorney right is dissolved after death? am i correct ?
Hi, just checked the guidance on their website and that's what it says, ends on death and then I guess it's down to the executors of the will.
2 Likes #33
You can also get a certified copy done free of charge at your local job centre if you need it for benefit purposes for the donor.
2 Likes #34
Is it just me that's sat reading this thinking - Jeez! I'd actually WANT an expensive solicitor on hand before I sign away ANY authority to control my own financial decisions.

Is this really a "Deal?!" - I'm sorry but your talking about the decision to take away a persons right to decide upon the future of their own life times worth of hard graft. In some cases this results in thieving scum family members stealing from vulnerable senior citizens! - or worse - middle age people whom, for one reason or another are incapacitated.

Now - I do understand this entire process because I have a parent whom suffers with mental illness and let me assure you, a persons capacity to make sound decisions can differ on a day by day basis and should ALWAYS be subject to question from a third party. To be completely fair I'm glad there are expensive solicitors out there to stand up for the people who'se rights we now seem to be able to flippantly sign away at the push of a button.

I urge all parties involved to think very carefully before agreeing to sign one of these. One "online" step too far in my opinion. Sorry. :(
3 Likes #35
cheekyweegit
You can also get a certified copy done free of charge at your local job centre if you need it for benefit purposes for the donor.
Some Post Offices offer to certify copies of documents I think it'd £10 for three certied copies
1 Like #36
Can I decide with LPA who will decide about my kids if I cannot and they are underage?
1 Like #37
cheekyweegit
You can also get a certified copy done free of charge at your local job centre if you need it for benefit purposes for the donor.
Some Post Offices offer to certify copies of documents I think it'd £10 for three certied copies
9 Likes #38
imiskeen
I urge all parties involved to think very carefully before agreeing to sign one of these. One "online" step too far in my opinion. Sorry. :(

On the other hand, if you find yourself in a situation where decisions need to made on your behalf, would you rather it was your choice or a random stranger?

Also worth noting that if you don't have an LPA in place when needed, then your relative will have to apply to become a Deputy instead. An altogether much more expensive process & subject to ongoing audit fees as well.
3 Likes #39
Thanks for the heads up, I was putting this off, but it is a reminder that I should do it now.
£164 is better than £220 I suppose.

Annoys me slightly why some people get it for free, I pay a lot of tax and NI to the government coffers.
#40
jonnyclewlow
BigAde
Thanks OP - had been thinking of doing this.
What would be the benefit of doing this online versus doing it at a solicitors?
Think you will need to pay extra for solicitors ... online is just the cost of the process itself (£82)

That's true, I think they were implying automatically wise?. :-)

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