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Crown 2kw fan heater £4.98 @ Morrisons

Chet Avatar
5y, 8m agoFound 5 years, 8 months ago
I didn't buy this as I don't need one but Morrisons had a 2kw Crown fan heater for just under a fiver (either £4.97 or £4.98)

Apologies for the vagueness but its a cracking deal

Looked exactly like the one in the photo but I don't have a model number
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Chet Avatar
5y, 8m agoFound 5 years, 8 months ago
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#1
what photo??
#2
andyken
what photo??

Photo now up. Didnt save the first time for som reason
1 Like #3
These run away with the leccy like anything, had one when I lived in a flat years ago.
#4
philmitchell
These run away with the leccy like anything, had one when I lived in a flat years ago.

Yes they are stupidly expensive. I use an oil filled myself which appears to be much more efficient

Still thought i'd post this as ive never seen a 2kw one for under a fiver but totally agree - only buy electric heater if you know how expensive it will be in the long run
1 Like #5
Oil filled need to be on for ages before you get any benefit of them being on, fan heaters are instant heat which is handy to have on in the mornings while getting ready for work.

2KW fan heater costs about 18p an hour to run, if i remember rightly?

So a 2KW oil filled will cost the same, only it will take a lot longer to get warm.
1 Like #6
RS2000
Oil filled need to be on for ages before you get any benefit of them being on, fan heaters are instant heat which is handy to have on in the mornings while getting ready for work.

2KW fan heater costs about 18p an hour to run, if i remember rightly?

So a 2KW oil filled will cost the same, only it will take a lot longer to get warm.


Will be more like 25p an hour based on unit prices I've found recently. Which would equate to £90/year @ 1 hour each day. Not a cheap way to heat your house!!
#7
worth picking up if only for using in emergencies
#8
I have one, and for quick heat, it's spot on.

Very noisy, though. (It's a few years old, but the exact same model.) :/
#9
I am on night rate electricity, between 0030hrs and 0730hrs this heater costs about 7p per hour to run on full (2kW). since I have to be at work by 6am, a heater like this provides a fast, good roomful of heat safely on a timeswitch when I need it for a reasonable rate - certainly better than switching the central heating on - everyone else in my house is sensibly asleep when I get out of bed.
#10
Buy this and stick it in the footwell of your car, switch it on and connect to an extension lead. On a frosty morning five minutes before you need your car switch on the heater from the comfort of your house. No scraping and a nice warm car when you drag yourself outside!
#11
jaffacake
I am on night rate electricity, between 0030hrs and 0730hrs this heater costs about 7p per hour to run on full (2kW). since I have to be at work by 6am, a heater like this provides a fast, good roomful of heat safely on a timeswitch when I need it for a reasonable rate - certainly better than switching the central heating on - everyone else in my house is sensibly asleep when I get out of bed.


A radiant halogen heater is still about a third of the cost of a fan heater - you could have that on a 400w setting for the same time as this and provide the same heating effect. :3
#12
think i might try cling film to insulate the windows to help conserve heat....anyone tried this?
#13
Would this be safe enough for camping?
1 Like #14
simba2585
think i might try cling film to insulate the windows to help conserve heat....anyone tried this?

I used B&Q's film insulation (not exactly cling film) last year and its quite effective, its a 2 man job to put it on the window but kept the drafts down. I was thinking of getting it again this year.
#15
buba2006
simba2585
think i might try cling film to insulate the windows to help conserve heat....anyone tried this?


I used B&Q's film insulation (not exactly cling film) last year and its quite effective, its a 2 man job to put it on the window but kept the drafts down. I was thinking of getting it again this year.


thanks :)

i cant find a cling film roll wide enough to cover the window in one pass. I know the idea is to create a tight seal but do you reckon 2 i could use to sheets taught and then tape in the middle and further taught (using hair dryer)...?

wonder if that would work...
#16
I used the Wickes film insulation. Seems to be working quite well - I even put two large sheets of it over two entire large sash windows, which stops the draughts if nothing else - we hardly ever open them anyway.

I wouldn't say it's a two man job - I did all the windows (including the two large sash windows) by myself. My method is to expose a little of the double sided sticky tape in the centre of each side of the window, so you end up with a couple of inches of exposed sticky tape at the N, S, E & W compass points. Then you stick the film to the N point, stretch it down to the S point, then E and W. Now the film is held in place you can expose the rest of the sticky tape and finish attaching the film one corner at a time, keeping the film well stretched. It should already be pretty well stretched if you use this method, so you won't need to heat it a lot with the hairdryer.
#17
simba2585
buba2006
simba2585
think i might try cling film to insulate the windows to help conserve heat....anyone tried this?
I used B&Q's film insulation (not exactly cling film) last year and its quite effective, its a 2 man job to put it on the window but kept the drafts down. I was thinking of getting it again this year.
thanks :)i cant find a cling film roll wide enough to cover the window in one pass. I know the idea is to create a tight seal but do you reckon 2 i could use to sheets taught and then tape in the middle and further taught (using hair dryer)...?wonder if that would work...

Are you seriously going to use cling film? I really can't see that working, and even if it does I can't see it looking very good. I'd shell out a little bit more for something that's actually designed for the job.
#18
I've just come out of grimsby morrisons, can't see any heaters for a fiver. They have the halogen ones for 10 which is about standard, and oil filled for 25.
On the clingfilm debate, which is perhaps off-topic, I have full upvc triple glazing in my house and its brilliant. Cost barely more than double glazing, too.
1 Like #19
QuackingPlums
jaffacake
I am on night rate electricity, between 0030hrs and 0730hrs this heater costs about 7p per hour to run on full (2kW). since I have to be at work by 6am, a heater like this provides a fast, good roomful of heat safely on a timeswitch when I need it for a reasonable rate - certainly better than switching the central heating on - everyone else in my house is sensibly asleep when I get out of bed.
A radiant halogen heater is still about a third of the cost of a fan heater - you could have that on a 400w setting for the same time as this and provide the same heating effect. :3

How can 400w be the same as a 2kw heat source?
1 Like #20
Chet
I use an oil filled myself which appears to be much more efficient
It is NOT more efficient. It is EXACTLY THE SAME efficiency as a fan heater or any other type of electric heater and therefore will cost ABSOLUTELY THE SAME AMOUNT TO RUN FOR A GIVEN HEAT OUTPUT. The only way you can cheat is to use storage heaters on Economy 7.

Sorry to shout, but they don't seem to teach physics in school nowadays.
#21
QuackingPlums
A radiant halogen heater is still about a third of the cost of a fan heater - you could have that on a 400w setting for the same time as this and provide the same heating effect. :3
That is completely wrong. You would only get 1/5th of the heating effect. It's called the law of conservation of energy.
1 Like #22
charlie brown
Would this be safe enough for camping?
Where do you get a 2kW source of electricity in a tent?
1 Like #23
mugi
Buy this and stick it in the footwell of your car, switch it on and connect to an extension lead. On a frosty morning five minutes before you need your car switch on the heater from the comfort of your house. No scraping and a nice warm car when you drag yourself outside!


Fine, but a potential death trap with a bit of condensation around or a bit of melting snow or ice. Use of an extension leads which will be essential means there WILL be a connection outside the house too, so make sure that the plug and socket for that is kept INSIDE the car and not trailing outside on an icy (therefore DAMP) day.

At the VERY least also run it through a plug-in RCD of the type used for garden electrical tools.
#24
nihcaj
a potential death trap

How much wood would Lynn Faulds Wood fold if Lynn Faulds Wood would fold wood?


Edited By: benjus on Nov 19, 2010 13:02
#25
I have a couple of radiant heaters too, they are very good for warming the body directly, they don't heat the room air much though. the two downsides to halogen are
1) soooo bright - you can't watch tv with a halogen heater on - it's like having a massive lightbulb on in the room.
2) the halogen tubes, being like a lightbulb, tend to blow fairly quickly. a three tube-halogen heater becomes a two tube, then a one tube within a couple of years.

oil filled heaters are far safer, but has been said, have a delayed effect when you switch them on whilst the oil heats up. that's not wasted heat though - you get it back when you turn the heater off and it stays warm for a while.

A radiant halogen heater is still about a third of the cost of a fan heater - you could have that on a 400w setting for the same time as this and provide the same heating effect. :3[/quote]
#26
benjus
nihcaj
a potential death trap


How much wood would Lynn Faulds Wood fold if Lynn Faulds Wood would fold wood?


Is that some sort of attempt at trolling?

It's not quite clear
#27
pibpob
Chet
I use an oil filled myself which appears to be much more efficient
It is NOT more efficient. It is EXACTLY THE SAME efficiency as a fan heater or any other type of electric heater and therefore will cost ABSOLUTELY THE SAME AMOUNT TO RUN FOR A GIVEN HEAT OUTPUT. The only way you can cheat is to use storage heaters on Economy 7.Sorry to shout, but they don't seem to teach physics in school nowadays.

Thats rubbish. A fan heater blows out heat and in a couple of minutes that heat is gone. To keep the room warm you need to leave it on. With an oil filled the oil inside stays warm. I have a thermostat on the oil filled and can leave it 'on' for a couple of hours but its only actually using electricity for half of that time as it cuts out as the heat is maintained

Ive actually tested this (sad I know) but if you left a fan heater on for an hour, even if it has a thermostat its actually blowing heat for most of that hour. On the flip side the oil filled switches between 'on' and 'off'
1 Like #28
Sorry - you have still failed to grasp basic physics.

1) The heat given out by the radiator while the element is off is exactly balanced by heat not given out while it is on. Yes, a fan heater stops producing heat instantly when switched off but an oil-filled radiator doesn't start producing heat instantly when it is switched on.

2) The thermostat cuts out because the heat can't escape into the room fast enough. Yes, it's only on half the time, but the result of that is you are only getting half the heat out.

So, you are saving nothing by using an oil-filled radiator compared with a fan heater. If you are paying less in electricity it's because your room is colder. If the room is too hot when using a fan heater that's nothing to do with efficiencies, it's because the heater is too powerful for the room. Comparing what the thermostats do on the different heaters tells you nothing; the temperature of the room is the only thing that matters. Sorry to shatter your illusions.
2 Likes #29
Chet
pibpob
Chet
I use an oil filled myself which appears to be much more efficient
It is NOT more efficient. It is EXACTLY THE SAME efficiency as a fan heater or any other type of electric heater and therefore will cost ABSOLUTELY THE SAME AMOUNT TO RUN FOR A GIVEN HEAT OUTPUT. The only way you can cheat is to use storage heaters on Economy 7.Sorry to shout, but they don't seem to teach physics in school nowadays.
Thats rubbish. A fan heater blows out heat and in a couple of minutes that heat is gone. To keep the room warm you need to leave it on. With an oil filled the oil inside stays warm. I have a thermostat on the oil filled and can leave it 'on' for a couple of hours but its only actually using electricity for half of that time as it cuts out as the heat is maintainedIve actually tested this (sad I know) but if you left a fan heater on for an hour, even if it has a thermostat its actually blowing heat for most of that hour. On the flip side the oil filled switches between 'on' and 'off'

It's not rubbish. You're right in saying that the oil stays hot, but do achieve that the oil filled heater needs to be switched on for a period of time before you actually start to feel heat coming out of it. Let's say, 30 minutes. If you switch it off, the oil will continue to give out heat for about 30 minutes after the electricity is off. So the two cancel each other out... the "free" heat you get after you switch off the heater is actually paid for by the time you wait for it to heat up at the start.

Sorry, but you can't cheat physics. Conversion from electricity to heat is almost 100% efficient, so whatever type of heater you buy the output is going to be more or less the same. OK, you do use up a small amount of energy powering the fan, but this is negligible compared to the energy used to provide the heat.
#30
Every time there's a thread about electric heaters, someone comes on with the myth that one sort of heater is more "efficient" than another. I find it so worrying the amount of money people must have wasted on heaters thinking that they are going to save money - all to the great delight of the manufacturers I'm sure. Yes, different types of heaters are more or less responsive. Yes, the heat is distributed differently which you can take advantage of. But no, you do not get more heat out of one sort of heater compared with another for a given power input (in other words, cost per hour). It's impossible.
#31
benjus
OK, you do use up a small amount of energy powering the fan, but this is negligible compared to the energy used to provide the heat.
Actually, virtually all the energy powering the fan is simply converted to heat as well (via inefficiencies in the motor and friction in the air), so even that doesn't detract from the efficiency of a fan heater!
#32
Chet
pibpob
Chet
I use an oil filled myself which appears to be much more efficient
It is NOT more efficient. It is EXACTLY THE SAME efficiency as a fan heater or any other type of electric heater and therefore will cost ABSOLUTELY THE SAME AMOUNT TO RUN FOR A GIVEN HEAT OUTPUT. The only way you can cheat is to use storage heaters on Economy 7.Sorry to shout, but they don't seem to teach physics in school nowadays.


Thats rubbish. A fan heater blows out heat and in a couple of minutes that heat is gone. To keep the room warm you need to leave it on. With an oil filled the oil inside stays warm. I have a thermostat on the oil filled and can leave it 'on' for a couple of hours but its only actually using electricity for half of that time as it cuts out as the heat is maintained

Ive actually tested this (sad I know) but if you left a fan heater on for an hour, even if it has a thermostat its actually blowing heat for most of that hour. On the flip side the oil filled switches between 'on' and 'off'


You really don't understand the point that has been made, do you? :-(
#33
lol...at the end of the day at a fiver its a bargain!
#34
pibpob
QuackingPlums
A radiant halogen heater is still about a third of the cost of a fan heater - you could have that on a 400w setting for the same time as this and provide the same heating effect. :3
That is completely wrong. You would only get 1/5th of the heating effect. It's called the law of conservation of energy.


Not arguing about conservation of energy - any heating device is by definition 100% efficient at producing heat - but how that heat is felt is where this is different.

If you have a 2kw fan heater blowing at your feet and a 400W halogen heater at your feet the net effect is the same - burnt feet!

It's cheaper to burn your feet using halogen than with a fan heater - because a fan heater heats the air, which dissipates (until eventually the entire room is warm) but the halogen heats only whatever absorbs infra-red radiation in front of it, i.e., your feet. :p

If you want to heat an entire room then there's no difference between the two. If you just want to be warm in the mornings, go with halogen. Alternatively just have plenty of money and f*ck the future generations... X)
#35
QuackingPlums
If you want to heat an entire room then there's no difference between the two. If you just want to be warm in the mornings, go with halogen.
Heated slippers would use less energy :)
#36
pibpob
QuackingPlums
If you want to heat an entire room then there's no difference between the two. If you just want to be warm in the mornings, go with halogen.
Heated slippers would use less energy :)


Sure, or as my mother used to say "stop whining and put on your housecoat..." X)

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