Crucial 64GB 2.5" SSD SATA-II Solid State Hard Drive £102.99 @ OCUK - HotUKDeals
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Crucial 64GB 2.5" SSD SATA-II Solid State Hard Drive £102.99 @ OCUK

£102.99 @ Overclockers
OK this is my first post and you can be as harsh as you want! Good price for a very fast 64GB SSD unlike previous posts I've seen on here, this one is actually worth buying cause of its blistering … Read More
bilal101 Avatar
7y, 9m agoFound 7 years, 9 months ago
OK this is my first post and you can be as harsh as you want!

Good price for a very fast 64GB SSD unlike previous posts I've seen on here, this one is actually worth buying cause of its blistering speed!!

Due into stock tomorrow

- Capacity: 64GB
- Cache: 64MB
- Read: Up to 200MB/sec
- Write: Up to 150MB/sec
- NAND Flash: Multi-Level Cell (MLC)
- Interface: SATA-II
- Low Power Consumption
- Shock Resistant
- Warranty: 5 Years


-----------------------------

The other capacities are also available to pre-order (due Fri 7th) at OCuk for the following inc VAT prices...

64Gb = £102.99
128Gb = £199.99
256Gb = £362.97

---[ Free delivery for OCuk forum members ]------------

OcUK Forums members who have 250 or more posts and have been registered for over 90 days

or

OcUK Forums members who have been registered for over 12 months and made at least 100 posts

----------------------------

- Cuddy
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#1
That's a good price for this me thinks.

Anyone know if I can get a faster better HD 1.8in drive for my dell D420. The disk is the bottle neck and its dead slow!

Disk shows up as Model MK3008GAL
#2
The average laptop drive reads/writes 50MB/sec so this drive is 400% as fast on the reads and 300% on the writes,

now thats the sort of of performance increase that you'll notice, none of this stupid overclocking your cpu by a couple of hundred Mhz nonsense!!!
#3
not a bad price as it's £120 direct from Crucial.
#4
disk.
#5
would this be enough for windows 7, if using the SSD purely for OS?
#6
bigup
would this be enough for windows 7, if using the SSD purely for OS?


more than enough
#7
Windows 7 64bit takes up approx 14 GBs
and with one of these drives would start up super FAST!
#8
Any one know what is the make of the controller on these drives as it is not mentioned on the OC site.
#9
These drives use the Samsung controller as used in the OCZ Summit drives
#10
I was talking to my brother (who i always consult on IT tech stuff), and he says there are issues with SSD surrounding the way they read and write in packages to the drive and not in individual bits like normal HDDs.

I think what he meant was that they are made up of lots and lots of small segments all together and they have to move between them (at very high speeds granted) to get all the info when reading. But when they are re-writing over a section of data they cant just change one small section of bits but need to re-write larges segments at a time.

All this being said they should be better than standard HDDs for a lot of things but maybe if you are transferring things to and from them a lot this may slow things down a bit over time.

Tech people please feel free to add to this if you know better, what he said did seem to check out from quick search of the nets.
#11
CHEEPSTUFFRULES!
I was talking to my brother (who i always consult on IT tech stuff), and he says there are issues with SSD surrounding the way they read and write in packages to the drive and not in individual bits like normal HDDs.

I think what he meant was that they are made up of lots and lots of small segments all together and they have to move between them (at very high speeds granted) to get all the info when reading. But when they are re-writing over a section of data they cant just change one small section of bits but need to re-write larges segments at a time.

All this being said they should be better than standard HDDs for a lot of things but maybe if you are transferring things to and from them a lot this may slow things down a bit over time.

Tech people please feel free to add to this if you know better, what he said did seem to check out from quick search of the nets.

I think the TRIM feature which Windows 7 will support (at some point!) addresses this. It's best to buy an SSD that supports this or will in the future. Intel's latest SSDs will support it in the future with a firmware upgrade; they need to sort the firmware anyway. :w00t:
#12
Just spokent ot Crucial online support and they have a firmware that supports TRIM that they hope to have released within the next 30 days, unfortunately they could not confirm that you do not need to format the drive when doing the firmware update.

The controller is apparantly a Indilinx Barefoot according to the agent as well,
#13
As also stated, available at Crucial direct, for just less than £120, with quidco currently at 10% and free delivery, may be a better deal if you are not happy using OKUK.
#14
marks
The controller is apparantly a Indilinx Barefoot according to the agent as well,


Yep, i read a review today which stated that :)
#15
Blisteringly fast! Wish I hadn't bought the Samsung one a couple of months ago now :-(
Never mind.
#16
RyCha
Blisteringly fast! Wish I hadn't bought the Samsung one a couple of months ago now :-(
Never mind.


Sell it too me cheap :-D
#17
bilal101
The average laptop drive reads/writes 50MB/sec so this drive is 400% as fast on the reads and 300% on the writes,

now thats the sort of of performance increase that you'll notice, none of this stupid overclocking your cpu by a couple of hundred Mhz nonsense!!!


yes cant deny that this drive is a massive improvment on standard drives, and good speeds over current budget ssd's, but about the post mentioning overclocking - this actually makes it sound like you dont know what your talking about...

take a standard core i7 920 that runs as standard about 2.66ghz then with a good heatsink and fan along with a decent motherboard and memory, it will hit 4ghz no problems. this is massive overclocking of about 1.4ghz and saving loads of cash on better processors hundreds of pounds more. why is this stupid, and nonsense?
#18
Anyone know if this would work in a macbook pro ?
#19
deano_uk
Anyone know if this would work in a macbook pro ?


Yes.:-D
#20
RyCha
Blisteringly fast! Wish I hadn't bought the Samsung one a couple of months ago now :-(
Never mind.


Is this the £91 64gb sammy at Novatech?
#21
I might pre-order 2 of those



I would rather have a couple of these ioXtreme from Fusion-io

http://img18.imageshack.us/img18/3293/fastn.jpg
#22
Will the speed drop if put in a computer which is SATA, not SATA II?
If so will the speed difference be noticible?
#23
Anybody know if this will be ok for my Dell mini 9 ? it has a 16gb ssd in it just now.

Thanks
#24
FUZZYWUZY
Anybody know if this will be ok for my Dell mini 9 ? it has a 16gb ssd in it just now.

Thanks

No it wont. The dell mini 9 does not use a sata interface.
#25
deano_uk
Anyone know if this would work in a macbook pro ?


thats what i intend to put it in :-D

will these freeze and do other crazy stuff like the old crappy ssds or are they good like the samsung ssds?
#26
owais
thats what i intend to put it in :-D

will these freeze and do other crazy stuff like the old crappy ssds or are they good like the samsung ssds?


They shouldn't do as they don't use the Jmicron controller.
#27
I was all for these drives and was waiting for the price to drop , I thought they'd be good for long term backups , but I read an article on a forum recently about these drives and they will only read/write so many times and then fail . Granted , it may be a few hundreds of thousands of reads or writes but if you have valuble data on them and they just die , are they worth it . Has anyone come across such information ?
#28
I was all for these drives and was waiting for the price to drop , I thought they'd be good for long term backups , but I read an article on a forum recently about these drives and they will only read/write so many times and then fail . Granted , it may be a few hundreds of thousands of reads or writes but if you have valuble data on them and they just die , are they worth it . Has anyone come across such information ?


Why is that different from conventional hard drives? Why does Patriot offer a 10 year warranty on their new TorqX SSDs?
#29
ricko
I was all for these drives and was waiting for the price to drop , I thought they'd be good for long term backups , but I read an article on a forum recently about these drives and they will only read/write so many times and then fail . Granted , it may be a few hundreds of thousands of reads or writes but if you have valuble data on them and they just die , are they worth it . Has anyone come across such information ?


I think the HD can still be read, but not written to when the cells fail. So not as bad as a mechanical HD failure. Sure someone can clarify

I had this phobia of using my early Samsung SSD unit, so stopped using it as an OS drive as I couldn't eliminate all random writes without reducing function of PC, e.g. disabling heuristic ability of antivirus.

As this Crucial unit has 5 year warranty it beats all others brands, especially as Crucial have a base of operations in the UK too for a fast turn around once outside retailer 1 year warranty. So I’m seriously considering this unit, except I would prefer a larger capacity the way games and other software has increased in size requirements.
#30
Agharta
I think the TRIM feature which Windows 7 will support (at some point!) addresses this.


No, TRIM is nothing to do with the write amplification problem described.

Basically, all SSDs can read/write in 512 byte blocks. But they can only *erase* in blocks of about 512KB. So to overwrite a 4k file, they typically need to read in the 128k block, update it with the new 4k of data, erase the whole 512KB (which is comparatively quite slow, I've seen reports of 2ms) and write it back again with the new 4k in place. Hence the terrible benchmarks that most ssds have on small random writes. (sequential writes of 512KB or more only have to do one erase per 512KB, 4k writes have to do 128 of them)

The intel drives (and the fusion IO) basically have twice as much actual flash as the drive size, and rather than erasing/writing, they just write it to an unused block, without the erase part. This is much (*much*) faster. They then have a garbage collection thing going on in the background that will erase the original block when the disk is less busy, so it can be used again later.

See here: http://www.legionhardware.com/Bench/Crucial_M225_128GB/ASSSD_02.png - the top one is a 1st-gen drive showing essentially 'native' ssd performance. the bottom one is the intel drive, the middle two are 2nd gen ssds including this crucial drive, which reduce the write amplification problem but don't overspec (ship with more flash than advertised) the drive in order to do so (note that the fusion-io can be adjusted to only use 1/4 of the fitted flash in order to further increase performance)

TRIM support is a way for the OS to tell the drive that the blocks the drive is constantly having to juggle are not actually used by the OS so the drive can stop worrying about them. It's almost the difference between an empty, unused block and one that is coincidentally full of zeros. Or between a blank piece of paper and a piece of abstract art that also looks like a blank piece of paper. As you can see by the above intel/fusion description, the more blocks the drive *knows* are empty, the more room it has for writes and the less garbage collection/erasing it has to do.

Oh, yeah, and OCUK are a bunch of evil racists and I'd rather poke myself in the eye than buy from them. Buy from crucial direct - they rock.
#31
Stay away from this company as their customer service, ahem, is appaling. If you return a faulty item, it is never that the item was faulty, it's either you that broke it or some other lame excuse. They don't like giving refunds and nearly always quote "You need to contact the manufacturer".

I've seen them...

1] Blatently ignore their customers who are usually in a big queue waiting out of the door whilst one serves and the rest just chat.
2] Have a go at an elderly gent, in front of the whole shop, who was returning a faulty motherboard. Appaling that was.
3] Belittle their customers, especially women.
4] oh and a friend saw a fight in there.

Complete jokers and comboys, stay away.
#32
For the techy's among us :
Very good review of Intels X25-M and in general how the SSD's work ( and the problems with them)

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/intel/showdoc.aspx?i=3403&p=1
#33
Same as Oatcake above I feel compelled to warn others about how bad a service you will get from OCUK if, god forbid, they send you a faulty item...

I got an ATI 3850 graphics card from them about a year ago. It worked fine for an hour of use but then started to display lots of screen artifacts and display errors, I emphasised to them the issues would only start to occur after roughly 1 hour of use. I had confirmed this was an issue by testing the card in a friends system.


[LIST]
[*]It took 2 weeks for them to even look at the card... It was "forgotton about" and only found because I demanded on the phone they find it.


[*]20 mins after finding the card, there was an update on my support note from them saying there was nothing wrong with it and they were sending it back. The Support note had a full description saying the issue only occured after around an hour of use! I had also described the issue clearly over the many times i had called over the 2 weeks waiting for them to look at the card.


[*]On calling them back I stated that they needed to run the card for over an hour to see the graphic glitches they repeated to me there was nothing wrong with it.


[*]I refused to take it back and OCUK did give me a refund. I got the feeling this was because they didn't want anymore hassle (I lost my patience with them that day after 2 weeks of waiting and politely accepting they're excuses).


[*]A few days later I found out that they had charged me postage at next day courier rates.


[*]OCUK refunded the postage charges. at no point did I get any form of apology of all the things that they had done.

[/LIST]
#34
BUZZIN_NICE
yes cant deny that this drive is a massive improvment on standard drives, and good speeds over current budget ssd's, but about the post mentioning overclocking - this actually makes it sound like you dont know what your talking about...

take a standard core i7 920 that runs as standard about 2.66ghz then with a good heatsink and fan along with a decent motherboard and memory, it will hit 4ghz no problems. this is massive overclocking of about 1.4ghz and saving loads of cash on better processors hundreds of pounds more. why is this stupid, and nonsense?


I think he means the home user is more likely to notice/appreciate super fast load times, than improving for example, a video render speed by 30 seconds or taking a game from 80 FPS to 100 FPS. Gaming frame rates have been the main driving force of overclocking over the years, I don't blame people for finding that a waste of time.
#35
foobie
No, TRIM is nothing to do with the write amplification problem described.

Basically, all SSDs can read/write in 512 byte blocks. But they can only *erase* in blocks of about 512KB. So to overwrite a 4k file, they typically need to read in the 128k block, update it with the new 4k of data, erase the whole 512KB (which is comparatively quite slow, I've seen reports of 2ms) and write it back again with the new 4k in place. Hence the terrible benchmarks that most ssds have on small random writes. (sequential writes of 512KB or more only have to do one erase per 512KB, 4k writes have to do 128 of them)

The intel drives (and the fusion IO) basically have twice as much actual flash as the drive size, and rather than erasing/writing, they just write it to an unused block, without the erase part. This is much (*much*) faster. They then have a garbage collection thing going on in the background that will erase the original block when the disk is less busy, so it can be used again later.

See here: http://www.legionhardware.com/Bench/Crucial_M225_128GB/ASSSD_02.png - the top one is a 1st-gen drive showing essentially 'native' ssd performance. the bottom one is the intel drive, the middle two are 2nd gen ssds including this crucial drive, which reduce the write amplification problem but don't overspec (ship with more flash than advertised) the drive in order to do so (note that the fusion-io can be adjusted to only use 1/4 of the fitted flash in order to further increase performance)

TRIM support is a way for the OS to tell the drive that the blocks the drive is constantly having to juggle are not actually used by the OS so the drive can stop worrying about them. It's almost the difference between an empty, unused block and one that is coincidentally full of zeros. Or between a blank piece of paper and a piece of abstract art that also looks like a blank piece of paper. As you can see by the above intel/fusion description, the more blocks the drive *knows* are empty, the more room it has for writes and the less garbage collection/erasing it has to do..

Thanks. TRIM is part of the solution. :thumbsup:
#36
foobie
Oh, yeah, and OCUK are a bunch of evil racists and I'd rather poke myself in the eye than buy from them. Buy from crucial direct - they rock.


Most of the electronics we blatantly binge on, relies on the exploitation and slavery of children in the DR Congo who mine Coltan. If that isn't bad enough, these profits help fuel some of the worst racism and suffering the world has seen. A poke in the eye, over some peoples objection to the UK's immigration policy, pales into insignificance.
#37
Gold Feet
Most of the electronics we blatantly binge on, relies on the exploitation and slavery of children in the DR Congo who mine Coltan. If that isn't bad enough, these profits help fuel some of the worst racism and suffering the world has seen. A poke in the eye, over some peoples objection to the UK's immigration policy, pales into insignificance.


Saying as neither you or I did'nt deliver any of the message on here via pigeon we can't really complain can we ?
#38
dontasciime
Saying as neither you or I did'nt deliver any of the message on here via pigeon we can't really complain can we ?


I wasn't complaining, I was pointing out how poor foobie's moral stance is.
#39
Gold Feet
I wasn't complaining, I was pointing out how poor foobie's moral stance is.


foobie moral stance is absolutely fine.
Its ridiculous to say don't critise one thing because there is something (allegedly) happening somewhere else that is worse. Then we are encouraged to do nothing about nothing.

I would take issue with your nilihism that everythng manufactured in the third world is evil. its a necessary transfer of money to people that need it. Exploitation that does not benefit the locals, or causes them harm, should be stopped in the first place by laws in the countries where it occurs, which is out of our control. If we hear of something unsavoury done by a company in our domicile that knows what is happening, we would be right to demand a change. But blanket condemnation is useless. The fact is that after cheap human labour has been exhausted, all the grunt work can be robotised. There is a bike factory in italy turning out 100000s of bikes a year with 10 engineers running it. In china they uses 100s of low paid people in the equivalent factory. Lets hope, for their sake, the third world can become the 2nd or 1st world before we no longer need their labour.
#40
ricko
I was all for these drives and was waiting for the price to drop , I thought they'd be good for long term backups , but I read an article on a forum recently about these drives and they will only read/write so many times and then fail . Granted , it may be a few hundreds of thousands of reads or writes but if you have valuble data on them and they just die , are they worth it . Has anyone come across such information ?

Don't worry - you can write to the entire drive, 24x7, and it will still last years before it wears out. Lifespan is a none-issue - you'll have replaced the drive by the time it dies.
Arstar
I had this phobia of using my early Samsung SSD unit, so stopped using it as an OS drive as I couldn't eliminate all random writes without reducing function of PC, e.g. disabling heuristic ability of antivirus.

See above - you can use it as much as you like, without worry.
This myth stemmed from early flash which really did have a limited life - 10,000 writes and a cell was dead. Modern drives last many times longer.

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