Crucial MX300 275GB SATA 2.5" Internal SSD £63.59 @ Crucial - HotUKDeals
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Crucial MX300 275GB SATA 2.5" Internal SSD £63.59 @ Crucial

£63.59 @ Crucial
Funny capacity. I read this range kinda should be bx, not mx but knowing specs and real-world gains it's not gonna make a noticeable difference EDIT: I read it as 375GB... fool... delete delete… Read More
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8m, 1w agoFound 8 months, 1 week ago
Funny capacity.

I read this range kinda should be bx, not mx but knowing specs and real-world gains it's not gonna make a noticeable difference

EDIT: I read it as 375GB... fool... delete delete
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8m, 1w agoFound 8 months, 1 week ago
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3 Likes #1
£63.04 on Amazon.
5 Likes #2
Weird capacity.
1 Like #3
£59.89 on amazon with student discount
2 Likes #4
K1LLER HORNET
Weird capacity.

Uses 6x48GB chips. So 288GB provisioned down to 275GB.
2 Likes #5
Why is this a deal and why are people (idiots) voting it hot?
43 Likes #6
chapchap
Why is this a deal and why are people (idiots) voting it hot?
Voted hot just to annoy you.
6 Likes #7
Voted hot just for chapchap
8 Likes #8
Eat my heat ChapChap
4 Likes #9
I'm a hot voting idiot too! Take that Chapchap
2 Likes #10
Ditto.
2 Likes #11
HOT!
2 Likes #12
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
2 Likes #13
#Hot4chapchap
#14
Hot from me, also 7% off with vouchercloud.
1 Like #15
why is this hot?
considering that you can get the MX300 SSD with 750GB for anything arround £100-£125-£135 on ebay from various sellers.
Own 4x of these SSDs and noticed a significant performance increase if compared with standard SATA HDDs, they run much cooler too SSDs at about 38C, standard HDD at 55C before
4 Likes #16
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that

It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >

http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/

It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.

A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.

2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.

Edited By: fishmaster on Aug 12, 2016 11:53
#17
HappyWizard
why is this hot?
considering that you can get the MX300 SSD with 750GB for anything arround £100-£125-£135 on ebay from various sellers.
Own 4x of these SSDs and noticed a significant performance increase if compared with standard SATA HDDs, they run much cooler too SSDs at about 38C, standard HDD at 55C before


from who because the cheapest i see is £150 pm me

Edited By: ijwia on Aug 12, 2016 12:13
#18
what is the cheapest 240gb out there at the moment.
cheers
1 Like #19
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/
It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.
A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.
2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.

I'm not sure I understand your point? I was stating that when you buy a drive, you dont get the space you expect. These seemingly 'odd' sizes are more likely, after all is said and done, to yield 'normal' storage sizes to which we have become accustomed to, i.e 125, 250, 500, 750 & 1tb etc
1 Like #20
dave111
what is the cheapest 240gb out there at the moment.
cheers

I've been waiting for another good deal for the same size SSD for a few weeks myself. Current cheapest I can find are Hectron X1 Series £47 Amazon and Gloway Hectron £43 eBay. There have been branded ones for the same money at other times, just got to wait...

Edited By: Daveh1664 on Aug 12, 2016 14:25
#21
Would this be better than a Sandisk Ultra II 240 @ Amazon for £62 ?

Been waiting for an SSD deal for a while, but prices have been stagnant.
1 Like #22
Using Flubit.com on the Amazon link I get this down to £55 inc. Delivery!...If only I needed one of these :)

http://i.imgur.com/kkNmXJF.jpg


Edited By: waxsta on Aug 12, 2016 18:07
#23
Joefez
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/
It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.
A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.
2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.
I'm not sure I understand your point? I was stating that when you buy a drive, you dont get the space you expect. These seemingly 'odd' sizes are more likely, after all is said and done, to yield 'normal' storage sizes to which we have become accustomed to, i.e 125, 250, 500, 750 & 1tb etc

No you mentioned formatting. I'll quote you "As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted."

That sentence is nonsense to me or you've not explained what you mean by it properly. I'm specifically saying it's nothing to do with formatting which you imply it is in your sentence. Anyway I think I've explained in detail why the storage size differs.
2 Likes #24
I was going to vote this cold as it is not really cheap, but then I saw Chap Chaps comment so I voted hot
1 Like #25
HappyWizard
why is this hot?
considering that you can get the MX300 SSD with 750GB for anything arround £100-£125-£135 on ebay from various sellers.
Own 4x of these SSDs and noticed a significant performance increase if compared with standard SATA HDDs, they run much cooler too SSDs at about 38C, standard HDD at 55C before


Yes people notice a huge improvement when using an SSD, which is no sheer coincidence, it's the primary reason for buying one. :p
#26
fishmaster
Joefez
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/
It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.
A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.
2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.
I'm not sure I understand your point? I was stating that when you buy a drive, you dont get the space you expect. These seemingly 'odd' sizes are more likely, after all is said and done, to yield 'normal' storage sizes to which we have become accustomed to, i.e 125, 250, 500, 750 & 1tb etc
No you mentioned formatting. I'll quote you "As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted."
That sentence is nonsense to me or you've not explained what you mean by it properly. I'm specifically saying it's nothing to do with formatting which you imply it is in your sentence. Anyway I think I've explained in detail why the storage size differs.

While it probably isn't worded that well. It is pretty easy to understand what he is getting at.
1 Like #27
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/
It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.
A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.
2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.

That's not strictly true, formatting DOES make a difference. You get more disk space out of it if you format it exFAT or ext3 than if you format it NTFS as you have to account for the space taken by the relatively large on-disk structures that NTFS uses for things like file-level security and file/folder metadata.
1 Like #28
BigBuds
chapchap
Why is this a deal and why are people (idiots) voting it hot?
Voted hot just to annoy you.
I did the same :)
1 Like #29
mysticus
I did the same :)[/quote]
I believe everyone has. This in reality shouldn't have got so hot but an idiot calling people an idiot for voting hot has caused everyone to vote it hot.:)
#30
akersj
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that
It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/
It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.
A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.
2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.
That's not strictly true, formatting DOES make a difference. You get more disk space out of it if you format it exFAT or ext3 than if you format it NTFS as you have to account for the space taken by the relatively large on-disk structures that NTFS uses for things like file-level security and file/folder metadata.

In terms of the % difference it's irrelevant as a comparison with the difference between Gigabyte (manufacturer) and Gibibyte (real storage size). As the drive size increases so does the decrement in realised storage amount versus the manufacturer quotation. However if you wish to be pendantic about it, you got me there son.

Edited By: fishmaster on Aug 12, 2016 23:35
#31
Nothing hot about this. I bought a Crucial 480Gb SSD for 72.99 during an Amazon flash sale a few months ago. Right now this particular deal is £63.04 on Amazon UK, its usual everyday price. Save yourself 55p and buy that scorcher instead or just wait it out. I guarantee Amazon will eventually put this on a flash sale for about £40.
#32
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that

It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >

http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/

It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.

A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.

2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.


Whilst that is true, different formats will yield different free space due to the partition table.
#33
MrHot
fishmaster
Joefez
As for the capacity, once it's been formatted you're more likely to end up with a 250GB drive, than a 250GB unformatted drive that ends up around 230GB formatted. I guess it kind of makes sense that they format down to 'standard' sizes. At least If you have 4 of them you will actually have 1tb of free space rather than 898GB or something silly like that

It's nothing to do with the actual formatting, it's the actual real storage size that you see, anyway this article explains it >

http://www.howtogeek.com/123268/windows-hard-drive-wrong-capacity/

It's the difference between the manufacturer's rating of storage versus the real storage size of the platter or NAND chips.

A Gigabyte is 1000, the real term for the actual storage is Gibibyte which is 1024. Consumers are used to Gigabytes but computer storage always works in Gibibytes.

2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024. Computers work with the power of two because of the binary system they use, it takes the same amount of address space to save 7KB as it does 8KB.


Whilst that is true, different formats will yield different free space due to the partition table.


What he said.
#34
Jinkz
#Hot4chapchap
:D
#35
chapchap
Why is this a deal and why are people (idiots) voting it hot?
When comments backfire, No. 8294362
Getting hotter all the time ... :p
#36
Voted hot, managed to get it for £53.88 via Flubit.
#37
This or Samsung 750 EVO?
1 Like #38
praevalens
This or Samsung 750 EVO?

What's the price diff?

Expect most would say Evo. I think Samsung are being too clever... I'd rather have a simpler controller so I'm more likely to get Windows to run RAID properly... Having said that, as boot-drive, Evo prolly...

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