DELL PowerEdge T20 Tower Server (Pentium G3220) £119.94 delivered @ ServersPlus - HotUKDeals
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DELL PowerEdge T20 Tower Server (Pentium G3220) £119.94 delivered @ ServersPlus

£119.94 @ Serversplus
Been on offer many times before but this is the cheapest I've yet seen it without cashback and this time it comes with a 500gb HDD. A cracking little box if you don't need the horsepower of the Xeon v… Read More
VladTheImpaler Avatar
3m, 2w agoFound 3 months, 2 weeks ago
Been on offer many times before but this is the cheapest I've yet seen it without cashback and this time it comes with a 500gb HDD. A cracking little box if you don't need the horsepower of the Xeon version.

Intel Pentium G3220 (3M Cache, 3.00 GHz), 4GB (1x4GB) 1600MT/s UDIMM Single Rank, 500GB LFF Non Hot-Plug Hard Drive, Intel 82579, 290W PSU, UK Power Cord, 1 Year Warranty

Free delivery using voucher code DELLFREEUK
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VladTheImpaler Avatar
3m, 2w agoFound 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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#1
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?
2 Likes #2
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?
It's cheaper than a NAS and could also be used as a PLEX server (as many do)
I'm waiting on the Xeon to be on offer again, but this is plenty of bang for your buck
#3
mrew42
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?
It's cheaper than a NAS and could also be used as a PLEX server (as many do)
I'm waiting on the Xeon to be on offer again, but this is plenty of bang for your buck

Oh, and have some heat OP :)
#4
mrew42
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?
It's cheaper than a NAS and could also be used as a PLEX server (as many do)
I'm waiting on the Xeon to be on offer again, but this is plenty of bang for your buck
CPU is a tad weak for transcoding, maybe one stream from Plex.

Cheap starter VM box to fiddle with?

Super price though.
#5
powerbrick
mrew42
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?
It's cheaper than a NAS and could also be used as a PLEX server (as many do)
I'm waiting on the Xeon to be on offer again, but this is plenty of bang for your buck
CPU is a tad weak for transcoding, maybe one stream from Plex.
Cheap starter VM box to fiddle with?
Super price though.
If no transcoding is required it can manage a couple of/3 streams
Depends on the client of course
#6
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?

i use one as a desktop running windows 10. i added a couple of sata cards and squeezed a few more HDD's along with a SSD bootdrive and a £50 graphics card for HDMI out with audio (as the dvi audio is disabled, but works without sound with a cheap adapter). i replaced an old quad core 2.5ghz machine. i don't stress it too much but it runs on similar par with the old machine. once i find a good price i'll upgrade the RAM and i'll upgrade the CPU to something better in future
2 Likes #7
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?

Perhaps it's best if others describe what they're using their home servers for. I use mine for VMs so the devices with low power processors can access something capable of heavy lifting. I also use them as routers using pfsense, for network storage, for torrents, for plex, for video transcoding (so many things are encoded by throwing huge bitrates at them and hoping for the best, with more processing time you can cut a 20GB movie down to 5GB say), for backups of other machines and uploading those backups to the cloud.

Edited By: CampGareth on Feb 10, 2017 15:52
1 Like #8
I got one of these a while back and use it as a desktop (£79 after cashback I think it was). Added an old graphics card and runs Win 10 fine - a little faster than my old i5-750, quieter. But cannot sleep.
I also have a Xeon version (£175 after cashback a while back, courtesy of this forum again!) as a home server, couple of VMs (WHS for backups), Plex server, utorrent, Logitech Media server etc. Both have been rock solid so far.
#9
Tempted but 4GB ram paltry and expensive to upgrade otherwise i'd have been in.
#10
I have seen this exact spec do 3 Plex streams and a couple of downloads at the same time with no problems. Though I don't think they were 1080p. Most devices and file formats don't need to be transcoded.
#11
mikeyw
Tempted but 4GB ram paltry and expensive to upgrade otherwise i'd have been in.

I have used non-ECC in my Xeon version of this with no issue
#12
Heat but been this price before. Its kind of basic - but sometimes that is better than something more complex like HP. CPU may be expensive to upgrade (not looked yet), everything else is pretty cheap as far as I can tell
#13
mikeyw
Tempted but 4GB ram paltry and expensive to upgrade otherwise i'd have been in.
FWIW you can get 4GB modules of compatible Kingston DDR3L PC3-12800 ECC RAM for £12.99 each from an eBay seller (search for KVR16LE11S8). I can confirm from my own experience these work flawlessly in the T20 alongside the presupplied Hynix module, and for the OCD types the timings are identical.

You'll max out at 16GB of course with all four slots populated, but 8GB/16GB sticks don't come cheap these days and you'll probably want the Xeon version in any case if you're thinking of running a fistful of VMs simultaneously.
#14
Done some research and cpu only i3 euiv not i5 as mentioned. I need a lightroom rig so going to pick up a 2nd hand i5 pc.
1 Like #15
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?


You can set it up a router as well. Would destroy arm based routers.
#16
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.

http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8

You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
#17
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.

This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.

I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
#18
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)
3 Likes #19
kester76
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)

The same people that have 30 minute 13Kw showers every morning and think their electric bill comes from phone chargers left turned on.
#20
Awful post-sales service from this company IMHO.
#21
That's a good non cashback price.
Same spec as the one I bought from eBuyer last May and that has been running WHS 2011 solid as a rock.
#22
jg213
I just wondering... as a home user, what kind of use could I have for a server? the thing that pops into my head is to use it as a NAS but are there other uses I'm not thinking of? and is it worth using a server like this as a NAS over a dedicated NAS?

http://www.openmediavault.org/
#23
kester76
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)
You are using set theory incorrectly, those who use 50W halogen spots are mutually exclusive to the users who are energy conscious. Namely, those who calculate the energy requirements or use an energy cost meter typically use low energy bulbs bulbs.
.
Moreover you have crucially left out a key component, time which is duration. A 50W halogen may be used for 5 mins but a 15W low energy may be used for 10 hours.
#24
sneakybifta
kester76
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)
The same people that have 30 minute 13Kw showers every morning and think their electric bill comes from phone chargers left turned on.
I doubt this very much, people ignorant 13 kilo-watts versus 1.3 watts, only in jest.
#25
splender
sneakybifta
kester76
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)
The same people that have 30 minute 13Kw showers every morning and think their electric bill comes from phone chargers left turned on.
I doubt this very much, people ignorant 13 kilo-watts versus 1.3 watts, only in jest.

In this weather, I just treat the heat generated by my Server as extra heating :)
#26
simonhzero
splender
sneakybifta
kester76
VladTheImpaler
amdavies
If left on 24/7, this will cost in the region of ~£32 per year to run when idle, ramping up to ~£54 when under load. This should also be factored into the equation when comparing solutions.http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cpu/68797-intel-pentium-g3220-22nm-haswell/?page=8
You might shave some cost off depending on the efficiency of the PSU.
That seems a little pessimistic - according to my power meter, my G3220 T20 is pulling a total of around 15W from the wall at idle rising to about 25W under load. Depending on which robber baron power company you're signed up with, this would probably work out somewhere in the low £20+/year region for 24/7 usage.
This is admittedly with just an SSD boot drive and a single 1TB laptop HDD, but you'd have to factor in the extra power draw of additional HDDs whatever device you were putting them in.
I suppose the point I'm getting at is that the running cost of the T20 probably wouldn't be a significant concern compared with alternative devices such as purpose-designed NAS boxes.
This always makes me chuckle as most people freak out about this energy usage but run 50W halogen spots through their home :)
The same people that have 30 minute 13Kw showers every morning and think their electric bill comes from phone chargers left turned on.
I doubt this very much, people ignorant 13 kilo-watts versus 1.3 watts, only in jest.
In this weather, I just treat the heat generated by my Server as extra heating :)
Often overlooked, people do 365 calculations whereas in reality home electronics heat up the home in cold weather so at best do 200 days calculations.
#27
is this better then Go proliant micrometer g7? can you do more with Dell?
#28
mihaitza_uk
is this better then Go proliant micrometer g7? can you do more with Dell?


hp proliant microserver
#29
mihaitza_uk
mihaitza_uk
is this better then Go proliant micrometer g7? can you do more with Dell?

hp proliant microserver

I upgraded from the HP Proliant Microserver g7 with AMD processor for the Xeon version of the T20.

I needed more horse power for plex transcoding. You can really tell the difference.

Main plus points other than that are USB3 you can put in a full size graphics card. Standard space for hard drives is 4x 3.5 and 2x 2.5 hdd but you need a sata expansion card as there is only 4 sata ports. 2x display ports Means you can directly connect to an hdmi tv without the need for expansion card.

Cons
Standard tower size.

I also find since it has the power I use it as my desktop for day to day stuff since it is on anyway and my gaming PC only turned on for gaming.

Fully windows 10 compatable I am not sure about the G7 I only ever had windows 7 on it.

Compare the processors if you have the AMD one with this Intel you should get double the power I have added the Xeon version also.

http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp[]=2020&cmp[]=477&cmp[]=1993

Hope this helps.






Edited By: Druff on Feb 12, 2017 21:07
#30
what kind of processor could you upgrade this in future with? Intel Xeon E3-1225 v3 or even 1275v3? Are there any BIOS updates to accept the refresh? Hard to tell from my searches...

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