Dell XPS 8700 - i7 3.9GHz, 32GB RAM, 3TB HDD + 256GB SSD, 2GB AMD Radion R9 270 - £809.10 @ Dell (inc 10% VIP Discount Code) - HotUKDeals
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Dell XPS 8700 with what looks like a big spec for a fair price.

Original price: £1,349.01p
Dell discount: - £450.00p
VIP discount: - £89.91p
Delivery Discount: - £19.99p
Total: £809.10p

Quick e-code: cdx8704

http://configure.euro.dell.com/dellstore/config.aspx?c=uk&l=en&cs=ukdhs1&kc=&oc=cdx8704
- keepitonthelow
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#1
Detailed spec here:
http://i633.photobucket.com/albums/uu53/mehtaman1/Dell_zps16074b27.jpg


Edited By: jai47 on Aug 01, 2014 11:56
#2
Any details on the power supply?
#3
MasterAK
Any details on the power supply?

I am having a look in the owners manual now:
[url=ftp://ftp.dell.com/Manuals/all-products/esuprt_desktop/esuprt_xps_desktop/xps-8700_Owner%27s%20Manual_en-us.pdf]XPS 8700 Manual[/url]
2 Likes #4
only downside to this is dell stock cases and psu's are usually whack... otherwise seems an ok system.
#5
Hot from me just because it's a monster for the price!
#6
Lucifer_UK
only downside to this is dell stock cases and psu's are usually whack... otherwise seems an ok system.


In my limited experience Dell cases are unfussy, no frills, cheap but functional. PSUs tend to be good quality and better than their rated spec.

As to this machine, it seems a good deal for the money but why can't they make it clear exactly what you are getting? For example some reviews for XPS 8700 show a SPDIF audio output - does this one have one? Who knows?

Edit: Actually I don't think it does have a SPDIF output.

Edited By: VDisillusioned on Aug 01, 2014 12:46
#7
Superb spec for the price, a real monster desktop
I've got the very similar XPS8500 desktop and the build quality is pretty good, sure it's not as solid their desktops were 10 years ago but it's not too shabby. Their PSU's always look a bit weak but they're generally realistic in their ratings and consistant unlike so many cheapo PSU's that promise 600watts but blow up or can't really cope with 250watts.

My measley 8500 only has an i5 with 4GB and an Evo SSD and the thing is really fast in everyday duties and pretty nippy with harder core duties.

My only other comment is that sometimes these crop up on Dell Outlet and can be much cheaper, I paid £359 via Outlet for mine (July 2012) for a scratch and dent and it was in nearly brand new condition. Having said that, there's a very similar spec to this on Outlet and it's more expensive.


Edited By: spannerzone on Aug 01, 2014 13:00: added info
#8
spannerzone
Superb spec for the price, a real monster desktop
I've got the very similar XPS8500 desktop and the build quality is pretty good, sure it's not as solid their desktops were 10 years ago but it's not too shabby. Their PSU's always look a bit weak but they're generally realistic in their ratings and consistant unlike so many cheapo PSU's that promise 600watts but blow up or can't really cope with 250watts.

My measley 8500 only has an i5 with 4GB and an Evo SSD and the thing is really fast in everyday duties and pretty nippy with harder core duties.

My only other comment is that sometimes these crop up on Dell Outlet and can be much cheaper, I paid £359 via Outlet for mine (July 2012) for a scratch and dent and it was in nearly brand new condition.

Thats a valid point about the Outlet, at the moment the PCs on there are more expensive than this deal:
Dell Outlet XPS Systems
2 Likes #9
This is pretty good value

32GB Ram (Overkill) - £200+
Intel I7 - £200+
GPU - £120
SSD - £80
Hard Drive- £70
#10
I think Dell are awful...

But this is a surprisingly good deal from them! Heat :)
2 Likes #11
XPS 8700 is shipped with 460W power supply. Nvidia GTX 660 Ti should work with the system without any issues. You would not require to change the power supply.

Thanks & Regards,
Appu S
#iworkfordell

Edited By: keepitonthelow on Aug 01, 2014 15:12
#12
keepitonthelow
XPS 8700 is shipped with 460W power supply. Nvidia GTX 660 Ti should work with the system without any issues. You would not require to change the power supply.

Thanks & Regards,
Appu S
#iworkfordell

Thank you for finding that out for us!
Presume the Radeon R9 270 would be ok to :)
#13
We're sorry, but we are unable to process your request to configure the identified product.
Has that one finished?
#14
#15
That's odd, I see this using the link

We're sorry, but we are unable to process your request to configure the identified product.

You have received this page for one of the following reasons:

An incorrect eValue Code was entered.
The requested offer has expired or the product is no longer available. Please use the links below to navigate to our current promotional offers.
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Please use the links below to browse our product range:
#16
Does it load if you go to:
dell.com/uk
Click "For Home"
Then "Popular Deal"

Once that loads, there is a tab for "Performance Deals"
Then the PC is listed on Page 2 (page numbers hidden in the upper right)
2 Likes #17
Absolutely stonking deal, I just did a quick price comparison on the parts in this system. (if you wanted to build it yourself)

£866.32 not including case, m/b, psu, wireless/BT4.0 card, mouse, keyboard (eBuyer price, I know, I know, but its a decent enough baseline comparison!).... So its cheaper to buy this even if you decide to swap internals into a better case, and/or add liquid cooling, etc. etc.

Regards
Flea
1 Like #18
It really does seem a really good price when you consider the operating system ect as well... whilst it may not be what your after it still would cost to add that to a build, you'd be lucky to build this any cheaper....
2 Likes #19
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.



If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Aug 01, 2014 17:15
2 Likes #20
monkeyhanger75
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.

If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Although your £140 more option has better quality items, you still miss quite a few items compared to the dell, I would gestimate these would set you back another £160 or so:-

24GB Ram
Blue-Ray combo drive
Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 + Bluetooth 4.0 (includes Intel Wireless Display and upto 1.3gb/sec over wireless much faster than 802.11n)
Keyboard
Mouse

1yr Next Day In-Home Service with Premium Phone Support. This is invaluable even for the tech savy, over the years I have had a few instances where incompatibilities, or faulty items cause random hard to trace issues that cause you to either replace or try various alternatives till you find the offending item. Imagine how much hassle that would be with parts sourced from 5 different suppliers, all blaming each others parts!

For the tech savy, building your own gaming rig is fantastic, and a great sence when you power it on and it works, but for those who are not so tech savy, this would be excellent for decent out of the box gaming with full backup phone and onsite support.

Here's a link to a review of the slightly lower speced model.

Regards
Flea


Edited By: Fleabum on Aug 01, 2014 17:42
#21
How do you get the 10% VIP discount code?
1 Like #22
UKseagull
How do you get the 10% VIP discount code?

Goto this link.

Click Register
Click Employee Register
Fill in details
Check email for code

Regards
Flea
#23
Does this PC even have a LAN network card? I've seen wireless mentioned.
#24
UKseagull
Does this PC even have a LAN network card? I've seen wireless mentioned.

I believe its an onboard LAN port (10/100/1000 Mbps) based on reviews I have seen.

Edited By: jai47 on Aug 01, 2014 20:10
1 Like #25
monkeyhanger75
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.



If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Why do you need a H100i and one of the more expensive Z97 chipset motherboards with a locked I7 4770? You can't overclock it anyway.

Also you can sell the 24gb (3 Sticks) of extra ram for around £140, which doubles your initial £140 difference. Then you have to factor in the warranty, wireless card. blu ray drive, peripherals etc.
#26
I got one with the discount, great deal :) Seems to be a great price from Dell.

To use the VIP voucher you need to go via the VIP link and then use the shop now button from there


Edited By: robbino on Aug 01, 2014 21:22
#27
MasterAK
monkeyhanger75
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.



If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Why do you need a H100i and one of the more expensive Z97 chipset motherboards with a locked I7 4770? You can't overclock it anyway.

Also you can sell the 24gb (3 Sticks) of extra ram for around £140, which doubles your initial £140 difference. Then you have to factor in the warranty, wireless card. blu ray drive, peripherals etc.

I think you'd better check your facts there - my 4770k will do a stable overclock to 4.6GHz thanks to the overclocking profiles of the motherboard and at low temps, thanks to the watercooling. It comes with superior onboard sound to the Dell, a better graphics card, more high speed connectivity and I have a Bluray reader/DVD burner (LiteOn) - I forgot to mention it as they are for nowt now, it's the Bluray burners that cost. You'll never sell 3 second hand (albeit unused/barely used) x 8Gb DDR3 1600MHz for £140 - That's retail, maybe £110 on ebay if you're lucky, seeing about £90 after fees. The warranty on all of my components eclipses the Dell warranty by some way (3 years to 5 years on most components, a whopping 10 years on my PSU). Better warranty, better/more flexible components (by quite a margin), quiet operation due to the very good cooling - My old Dell 530 Inspiron and the XPS8700 I had for a week sounded like a jet taking off - very poor cooling/ventilation on the Dell, as per most OEM computers with slim cases tightly packed.

This self build came about because I had took delivery of a faulty XPS8700 in May. There was a motherboard Hardware fault that caused frequent sound buzzing through my speakers, the integrated sound was shot from day 1. It was up for 769 after VIP discounts, a little less spec than this computer (no SSD and 16Gb memory). Customer service was awful seeking a remedy....Indian call centres with very little tech know how.

Self build isn't for everyone - some bum twitching when you insert the CPU onto the motherboard and bring the cage down to it's clamped state, and then the anticipation again when you turn everything on for the first time. I've had 2 Dells that have done me well in the past and had rock solid reliability for 6 years each, but I decided to push the boat out for a mid range gaming machine this time, knowing that in 5 years time, I may only be replacing the GPU to play catch-up, rather than buying a whole new computer.

Take into account the clear advantages of the better graphics card, overclocking potential, mSATA connectivity of the SSD for faster transfer, faster RAM (you definitely don't need more than 8Gb for a gaming computer), quieter operation, a PSU that will be more efficient at half load, run cooler (and quieter) with liquid cooling, you can clearly see where the extra money is going and it's well spent.

The mouse and keyboard that come with the dell are bottom end, the mouse is worth a fiver and maybe a tenner for the keyboard.



Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Aug 01, 2014 22:12: additional info.
#28
This is pretty good value for the spec
1 Like #29
monkeyhanger75
MasterAK
monkeyhanger75
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.



If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Why do you need a H100i and one of the more expensive Z97 chipset motherboards with a locked I7 4770? You can't overclock it anyway.

Also you can sell the 24gb (3 Sticks) of extra ram for around £140, which doubles your initial £140 difference. Then you have to factor in the warranty, wireless card. blu ray drive, peripherals etc.

I think you'd better check your facts there - my 4770k will do a stable overclock to 4.6GHz thanks to the overclocking profiles of the motherboard and at low temps, thanks to the watercooling. It comes with superior onboard sound to the Dell, a better graphics card, more high speed connectivity and I have a Bluray reader/DVD burner (LiteOn) - I forgot to mention it as they are for nowt now, it's the Bluray burners that cost. You'll never sell 3 second hand (albeit unused/barely used) x 8Gb DDR3 1600MHz for £140 - That's retail, maybe £110 on ebay if you're lucky, seeing about £90 after fees. The warranty on all of my components eclipses the Dell warranty by some way (3 years to 5 years on most components, a whopping 10 years on my PSU). Better warranty, better/more flexible components (by quite a margin), quiet operation due to the very good cooling - My old Dell 530 Inspiron and the XPS8700 I had for a week sounded like a jet taking off - very poor cooling/ventilation on the Dell, as per most OEM computers with slim cases tightly packed.

This self build came about because I had took delivery of a faulty XPS8700 in May. There was a motherboard Hardware fault that caused frequent sound buzzing through my speakers, the integrated sound was shot from day 1. It was up for 769 after VIP discounts, a little less spec than this computer (no SSD and 16Gb memory). Customer service was awful seeking a remedy....Indian call centres with very little tech know how.

Self build isn't for everyone - some bum twitching when you insert the CPU onto the motherboard and bring the cage down to it's clamped state, and then the anticipation again when you turn everything on for the first time. I've had 2 Dells that have done me well in the past and had rock solid reliability for 6 years each, but I decided to push the boat out for a mid range gaming machine this time, knowing that in 5 years time, I may only be replacing the GPU to play catch-up, rather than buying a whole new computer.

Take into account the clear advantages of the better graphics card, overclocking potential, mSATA connectivity of the SSD for faster transfer, faster RAM (you definitely don't need more than 8Gb for a gaming computer), quieter operation, a PSU that will be more efficient at half load, run cooler (and quieter) with liquid cooling, you can clearly see where the extra money is going and it's well spent.

The mouse and keyboard that come with the dell are bottom end, the mouse is worth a fiver and maybe a tenner for the keyboard.



Check your original post, you said you purchased an I7 4770 not a 4770K, which is a locked processor.
#30
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.
1 Like #31
jai47
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.

Not sure on that, but generally the restore options provided by Dell automatically set the OS back to 'out of the box' condition, including all drivers and Dell bloat ware.

Whenever I want to remove all the bloat ware, I just reinstall using MSDN versions, but I guess not everyone has the benefits of Technet and MSDN membership.

Regards
Flea


Edited By: Fleabum on Aug 02, 2014 13:34
1 Like #32
MasterAK
monkeyhanger75
MasterAK
monkeyhanger75
I built a similar spec comp for about £140 more, but with components that have far more futureproofing and decent overclocking potential.

I7 4770, Asus GTX760 2Gb graphics, 3Tb WD Green, 250Gb Samsung Evo840 SSD, Win 8.1, Asus Z97 Maximus VII Ranger motherboard, 8Gb 2400MHz Corsair Vengeance Pro memory (more than enough for gaming), Corsair Carbide 540 case, 850W Gold rated EVGA PSU, Corsair H100i liquid cooling. £140 well spent. The build on this Dell is "just enough", a better graphics card and heavy USB use for external devices may well mean you need a better psu too.



If you are building your own, pc part picker website and flubit can save you a fair bit. Flubit saved me about £90 on mine.

Why do you need a H100i and one of the more expensive Z97 chipset motherboards with a locked I7 4770? You can't overclock it anyway.

Also you can sell the 24gb (3 Sticks) of extra ram for around £140, which doubles your initial £140 difference. Then you have to factor in the warranty, wireless card. blu ray drive, peripherals etc.

I think you'd better check your facts there - my 4770k will do a stable overclock to 4.6GHz thanks to the overclocking profiles of the motherboard and at low temps, thanks to the watercooling. It comes with superior onboard sound to the Dell, a better graphics card, more high speed connectivity and I have a Bluray reader/DVD burner (LiteOn) - I forgot to mention it as they are for nowt now, it's the Bluray burners that cost. You'll never sell 3 second hand (albeit unused/barely used) x 8Gb DDR3 1600MHz for £140 - That's retail, maybe £110 on ebay if you're lucky, seeing about £90 after fees. The warranty on all of my components eclipses the Dell warranty by some way (3 years to 5 years on most components, a whopping 10 years on my PSU). Better warranty, better/more flexible components (by quite a margin), quiet operation due to the very good cooling - My old Dell 530 Inspiron and the XPS8700 I had for a week sounded like a jet taking off - very poor cooling/ventilation on the Dell, as per most OEM computers with slim cases tightly packed.

This self build came about because I had took delivery of a faulty XPS8700 in May. There was a motherboard Hardware fault that caused frequent sound buzzing through my speakers, the integrated sound was shot from day 1. It was up for 769 after VIP discounts, a little less spec than this computer (no SSD and 16Gb memory). Customer service was awful seeking a remedy....Indian call centres with very little tech know how.

Self build isn't for everyone - some bum twitching when you insert the CPU onto the motherboard and bring the cage down to it's clamped state, and then the anticipation again when you turn everything on for the first time. I've had 2 Dells that have done me well in the past and had rock solid reliability for 6 years each, but I decided to push the boat out for a mid range gaming machine this time, knowing that in 5 years time, I may only be replacing the GPU to play catch-up, rather than buying a whole new computer.

Take into account the clear advantages of the better graphics card, overclocking potential, mSATA connectivity of the SSD for faster transfer, faster RAM (you definitely don't need more than 8Gb for a gaming computer), quieter operation, a PSU that will be more efficient at half load, run cooler (and quieter) with liquid cooling, you can clearly see where the extra money is going and it's well spent.

The mouse and keyboard that come with the dell are bottom end, the mouse is worth a fiver and maybe a tenner for the keyboard.



Check your original post, you said you purchased an I7 4770 not a 4770K, which is a locked processor.

Ah, my mistake on omitting the K, potential of my set up makes the £140 difference negligible for me. I was always against building until I tried out my mate's rig and made the jump over buying something like the comp on offer.
#33
jai47
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.

You could try downloading a Win 8.1 retail "recovery" disc image from Microsoft, burning it and installing it and then giving your Dell provided key when prompted to do so, but it might reject it as it knows you've got a Dell key and might lock it out, insisting you get Dell recovery software to restore (and all the bloatware that comes with. You could then go on Dell's support centre to download individual drivers for your Hardware, to avoid the bloatware. In Windows and all the Dell software is on the SSD, with nowt on the HDD, you could try out the Retail installation of Win 8.1 on the HDD, safe in the knowledge you're not overwriting anything useful, then boot Windows from the HDD to try it out. If it works, do same on the SSD.
#34
jai47
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.


I'm not being rude but is it really that hard just to spend a little while and remove all the Dell crapware and install decent applications instead? That's what I did with my latest Windows 8 Dell laptop and, with Classic Shell installed to provide a decent interface, it's fine.
1 Like #35
Has the perfect specs for gaming but isn't built for it meaning crappy fan and cooler etc, is this life?
#36
monkeyhanger75
jai47
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.

You could try downloading a Win 8.1 retail "recovery" disc image from Microsoft, burning it and installing it and then giving your Dell provided key when prompted to do so, but it might reject it as it knows you've got a Dell key and might lock it out, insisting you get Dell recovery software to restore (and all the bloatware that comes with. You could then go on Dell's support centre to download individual drivers for your Hardware, to avoid the bloatware. In Windows and all the Dell software is on the SSD, with nowt on the HDD, you could try out the Retail installation of Win 8.1 on the HDD, safe in the knowledge you're not overwriting anything useful, then boot Windows from the HDD to try it out. If it works, do same on the SSD.

I was just looking into that, I know with office you can enter the key online and it will take you through to the download section.
I believe the same can be done with windows 8/8.1 Windows 8 re-download... once downloaded I'll have a bootable install disk.
The only catch may be that as it is OEM, I may need to backup a special Dell OEM.xml file and then before reactivation replace the OEM.xml file within windows :)... or just call up MS with the phone activation key, thats usually a 5min process.


VDisillusioned
jai47
Does anyone know if running the windows 8 "refresh" will remove all the Dell software rubbish that they add?
I don't know if an OEM install will have all that software pre-installed into the "refresh" option, or if I will get a clean windows after running it.

I'm not being rude but is it really that hard just to spend a little while and remove all the Dell crapware and install decent applications instead? That's what I did with my latest Windows 8 Dell laptop and, with Classic Shell installed to provide a decent interface, it's fine.

It's a fair point and it would be easier, however its just cleaner to reinstall windows fresh as by doing so the registry will not have any redundant files left. Add/remove programmes doesn't always do a total uninstall of an application.
Windows 8.1 on this spec of PC would only take 30-45min to install, from which most drivers will be installed during windows update.
Its just the reactivation that could be a mess.:|
#37
With this spec and an SSD for Windows to live in, it'll take you about 5 mins to install Win 8. from scratch. This is about how long it took for my build. Had real bother with getting Win 8.1. I bought an "upgrade" license, but had nothing to upgrade from. I registered to try out Windows 8.1 Enterprise for nowt, tried to enter my bought and paid for key, and it wouldn't take it, I was then able to upgrade from there with the upgrade disk. You shouldn't have that bother, just demonstrating that Microsoft can be pretty inflexible when it comes to reinstalling Windows - they may insist on reinstalling like for like (Dell bloatware version). Worth a try on the other drive first so you're not cocking up your SSD install if MS won't play ball.

Edited By: monkeyhanger75 on Aug 02, 2014 18:17
#38
jai47
Its just the reactivation that could be a mess.:|

Don't we just love online activation. It doesn't hurt the pirates, never has, never will. Only the £££ paying public gets put out.

Regards
Flea
1 Like #39
mahel
Has the perfect specs for gaming but isn't built for it meaning crappy fan and cooler etc, is this life?

The reason I built my own. The specs sound good, but it'll run hot and loud when you get it to use anything that'd flex its muscles, add a beefier GPU in future and the PSU might not be up to it (My Asus GTX760 can draw 225W on its own, and it's by no means top tier, a 780 will be pulling more power still). Adding a watercooling system will almost certainly invalidate your Dell warranty.
#40
monkeyhanger75
Adding a watercooling system will almost certainly invalidate your Dell warranty.

False. They will just not cover the non Dell part, they will still cover all of their own hardware.. This is stated on their community forums.

Regards
Flea

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