Draper 45801 Telescope RRP: £99.85 Price: £47.99 & this item Delivered FREE @ Amazon - HotUKDeals
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Product Description
Manufacturer's Description
Seek out the nebulae, moons, planets and galaxies with this Dobsonian optically designed (Newtonian) reflector telescope from Draper Tools. Ideal for viewing the sky at night and mounted on a Altazimuth mount, this is a great beginner's telescope. Focal length of 700 mm. Supplied with 3 x Barlow lens, 5 x 24 finderscope, aluminium tripod and accessory tray.

Box Contents

1 x Reflector telescope

3 x Barlow lens

5 x 24 Finderscope

1 x Aluminium tripod

1 x Accessory tray
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All Comments

(30) Jump to unreadPost a comment
Comments/page:
#1
Much better buying a decent pair of binoculars imo.
#2
Bino's are ok but for moon and star gazing this telescope would be ideal. :thumbsup:
#3
To be honest, you would be better off waiting for the Lidl offer that comes around every few months. It is a 70mm refractor (which is more efficient than a mirror and equates to a 90mm reflector) and is built by Bresser. The one I bought also had a proper equatorial mount on a sturdy tripod, unlike the simple alt/azimuth on the Draper.
1 Like #4
How are people voting this hot?

Please read up on choosing a telescope before spending any cash or even voting on this. This is more of a toy than a real telescope and a poor investment. You'd be far better buying a pair of 7x 50 binoculars, which would be used more often and can be put to other uses besides astronomy.

As Zad said, Lidl do a decent beginners scope every now and again, either wait until that offer or buy something with a mirror at least 6" (150mm) or lens of 3" (70mm), there's better telescopes on that site for just a few £ more.
banned#5
ta :)http://www.avatarjunkie.net/cimg/8e68c3c7bf14ad0bcaba52babfa470bd.gif
#6
GlentoranMark
How are people voting this hot?

Please read up on choosing a telescope before spending any cash or even voting on this. This is more of a toy than a real telescope and a poor investment. You'd be far better buying a pair of 7x 50 binoculars, which would be used more often and can be put to other uses besides astronomy.

As Zad said, Lidl do a decent beginners scope every now and again, either wait until that offer or buy something with a mirror at least 6" (150mm) or lens of 3" (70mm), there's better telescopes on that site for just a few £ more.



Would 7x50 bino's be as powerful as this for looking at the moon, wouldn't think so. :thumbsup:
1 Like #7
Would this be any good for general purpose dogging?
#8
:-)

AS previous poster said - I would get a decent set of binoculars for the same cash, even the £15 lidl ones would be better than this
#9
Voted hot because it's a good price (for what it is) but IMO, you need to spend at least £120-£150 to get a decent scope. If your serious about it, motorised drive is a must.
banned#10
GlentoranMark
How are people voting this hot?


Based on the saving compared to the inflated RRP, like every other deal on here!
#11
me im voting this hot coz i like this thing.
1 Like #12
GlentoranMark;4534246
How are people voting this hot?

Please read up on choosing a telescope before spending any cash or even voting on this. This is more of a toy than a real telescope and a poor investment. You'd be far better buying a pair of 7x 50 binoculars, which would be used more often and can be put to other uses besides astronomy.

As Zad said, Lidl do a decent beginners scope every now and again, either wait until that offer or buy something with a mirror at least 6" (150mm) or lens of 3" (70mm), there's better telescopes on that site for just a few £ more.


Totally agree.

This will be a piece of junk and likely to put off any young child from astronomy for life.

Get some decent binoculars and see if the young person actually shows an interest, then get a decent quality beginner's scope. At least the binoculars will be useful elsewhere if the astronomy bug wears off.
#13
esq3585;4535131
Would 7x50 bino's be as powerful as this for looking at the moon, wouldn't think so. :thumbsup:


It has little to do with power and everything to do with quality. The magnification levels quoted by this sort of scope are completely unuseable. It won't be a patch on the binoculars even at the lowest power.
#14
GlentoranMark
How are people voting this hot?

Please read up on choosing a telescope before spending any cash or even voting on this. This is more of a toy than a real telescope and a poor investment. You'd be far better buying a pair of 7x 50 binoculars, which would be used more often and can be put to other uses besides astronomy.

As Zad said, Lidl do a decent beginners scope every now and again, either wait until that offer or buy something with a mirror at least 6" (150mm) or lens of 3" (70mm), there's better telescopes on that site for just a few £ more.

merlinthehappypig
Totally agree.
This will be a piece of junk and likely to put off any young child from astronomy for life.

Get some decent binoculars and see if the young person actually shows an interest, then get a decent quality beginner's scope. At least the binoculars will be useful elsewhere if the astronomy bug wears off.


My thought exactly. I rarely vote cold but I think people that get tempted without further knowledge might haed towards a massive disappointment that will most likely put them off for good, which is a shame.

I still use my binoculars, and better, I can take them for a walk in the countryside too. They are much more useful and you'll be surprised by how much you can see already. They would make a perfect first step, as you'll find out if you really like astronomy and if you don't, you still haven't wasted the money as there will be many other uses. (now get off that neighbour's window!)

Sorry...
#15
Can anyone point me in the direction of a decent site / forum on these things? I've been wanting to get into astrology for years now but never really known where to start.

Also, is it true that from a city centre you can see FA? I live within a mile of Bristol city centre. I have a rooftop eight floors up I could use but am not sure if this would be suitable.

Thanks in advance.

P.s. I am fully aware of the difference between astrology and astronomy before anyone takes my jape too seriously.
#16
Recommend Stellarium .. Good free program and can put in your own location see what you should see in the night sky, constellations ( also superimposes pictures over the constellation which I find very useful ).

J
#17
Voted hot as its a good price for a toy microscope.

If you want something more serious I'd wait for Lidl to do their usual deal (usually around xmas???).

Alternatively, if you just want something sciencey for the kids you're better off with a microscope IMO. Again, Lidl sporadically do some cracking deals.
#18
naturals
Can anyone point me in the direction of a decent site / forum on these things? I've been wanting to get into astrology for years now but never really known where to start.

Also, is it true that from a city centre you can see FA? I live within a mile of Bristol city centre. I have a rooftop eight floors up I could use but am not sure if this would be suitable.

Thanks in advance.

P.s. I am fully aware of the difference between astrology and astronomy before anyone takes my jape too seriously.


http://forum.skyatnightmagazine.com/ is obv UK based and might be able to give you some advice about the skies around bristol. I imagine you would be able to see planets, but would struggle with DSOs. That said, I know nothing.
#19
merlinthehappypig
It has little to do with power and everything to do with quality. The magnification levels quoted by this sort of scope are completely unuseable. It won't be a patch on the binoculars even at the lowest power.


Have you tried the scope in question? Is is definitely unuseable?
#20
My Grandfather spent over £200 on a reflector many years ago and it turned out to be **** so from first hand experience and these are ****
#21
I think the brand name says it all here. More (in)famous for their DIY tools than anything else. Prepare to spend a few hundred for something decent.

Aperture is the most important feature: the larger, the more light it lets in, the brighter the image. Magnifications quoted are usually meaningless on 'scopes this quality. If this all you want to pay for a telescope, invest in something like 10 x 50 (or 60) binoculars. A few minutes searching astronomical sites will back this up and guide you to what to go for and not.
#22
cabbagebike
I think the brand name says it all here. More (in)famous for their DIY tools than anything else. Prepare to spend a few hundred for something decent.

Aperture is the most important feature: the larger, the more light it lets in, the brighter the image. Magnifications quoted are usually meaningless on 'scopes this quality. If this all you want to pay for a telescope, invest in something like 10 x 50 (or 60) binoculars. A few minutes searching astronomical sites will back this up and guide you to what to go for and not.


Yeah, but how much is a pair of Binoculars that can be tripod mounted? ever tried looking at the moon through binoculars. . . . . a tripod would be essential. . .
#23
naturals
Can anyone point me in the direction of a decent site / forum on these things? I've been wanting to get into astrology for years now but never really known where to start.

Also, is it true that from a city centre you can see FA? I live within a mile of Bristol city centre. I have a rooftop eight floors up I could use but am not sure if this would be suitable.

Thanks in advance.

P.s. I am fully aware of the difference between astrology and astronomy before anyone takes my jape too seriously.



I'm also in a very light poluted area very close to the centre of Belfast (also less than a mile). I own a pair of 10 x 50's binoculars and a Celestron Nexstar 102SLT (which is still small by telescope standards but far superior to the toy above). The light is a major problem but all bright stellar objects show well and even some dimmer objects in binoculars, my scope is great for the planets but poor for nebulae. The low mag of binoculars actually help as it shows more diffuse, spread out things.

I'm only a casual observer, once a week if I'm lucky but I love the subject. Beware though, it can get very expensive and addictive as you strive for more objects. I've already added extra eyepieces and a webcam to my scope. I now have my sights on a 10 or 12" dobsonian reflector which I've yet to tell my wife about :whistling:

Take things one step at a time, read up on the subject, see whats in the sky at a particular time then print yourself a star chart from the excellent free http://www.stellarium.org/, ( to find your latitude and longitude go to google earth or maps.) Wrap up warm, take a chair and see what you can see with the naked eye.
#24
Yeah, but how much is a pair of Binoculars that can be tripod mounted? ever tried looking at the moon through binoculars. . . . . a tripod would be essential. . .

The low magnification of binoculars make them ideal to be held in your hands. Most if not all decent bino's come with a tripod mount AFAIK.
#25
Here's a decent read although its very US based.

http://findascope.com/

It warns of the pitfalls of buying a toy scope like the one above. Remember this toy scope has a main mirror of just 76mm (3 inches).
#26
GlentoranMark
Here's a decent read although its very US based.

http://findascope.com/

It warns of the pitfalls of buying a toy scope like the one above. Remember this toy scope has a main mirror of just 76mm (3 inches).



So what would you recommend for starting out in astronomy then mark?
#27
#28
esq3585
So what would you recommend for starting out in astronomy then mark?


A pair of 7x 50 or 10x 50's binoculars are ideal.
#29
GlentoranMark
A pair of 7x 50 or 10x 50's binoculars are ideal.


If I were going for a telescope though, any ideas?
#30
Its not an easy question and I cannot give you a simple answer or a specific telescope.

What are your interests in astronomy? Planets? Deep Sky? Photography? Bit of everything?


A refractor is better suited to planets, it needs little maintainance but can get very expensive the bigger the objective lens.

A reflector with a long focal length is also good for planets but it can be cumbersome to carry.

A reflector with a short focal length is far better suited to deep sky objects like nebulae, shorter tube means its easier to handle but short focal lengths can lead to distortions in the mirror meaning blurry images. You usually get what you pay for in this respect.

In both cases for reflectors, mirrors can disalign and need to be set correctly. They also need occassional cleaning and resilvering (a new mirrored surface) once every few years.

How good is your viewing site? Have you good dark skies in the country? Are you city based? How much of the sky can you see from your location?


If you've a good dark site with a great viewing location then thats great. You can get as big a telescope as you can afford and leave it in location. If you need to transport your telescope then you'll need something easy to handle. It may not bother you the first few times but I'll guarantee you'll get bored with it eventually. Bigger is always better in astronomy but not necessarily if you have to transport it.

Mounts are very important as well and very relevent to your set up. An equitorial mount is the astronomers choice but you have to set it up correctly, if your transporting your scope for each viewing session then you don't want to spend 30 mins setting it up each time. An altazimuth mount needs no setting up but is no good if you want to try astrophotography. One further mount worth mentioning is a Dobsonian, this is a simpler version of an altazimuth mount and can bring the cost and portability down for larger mirrors.

There are other types of telescopes, hybrid lens and mirror based units. Some have great portability and/ or specific uses.

For a beginner, I would go for a minimum of 6" (150mm) Newtonian or a 3" (70mm) Refractor. Read the astronomy forums and ask questions, don't make a rash decision that will put you off the subject. My mate bought an 8" Dobsonian, it could barely fit in his car and he had to drive 20 miles to use it. He sold it 6 months later at a big loss.

I own one of these - http://www.celestron.uk.com/productinfo.php/Telescopes/Nexstar_SLT_Series/NexStar_102_SLT/3067

Very portable, light, 5 mins to set up and I now have the ability to take photo's via webcam.

http://img8.imageshack.us/img8/8311/moon1200902051915040.th.png

Cost me £300, I've added 2 extra eyepieces, a 2x barlow, a webcam and adapter. I haven't much change out of £500.

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