Draper 60792 Digital Multimeter With Backlight £8.84 with free delivery @Amazon.co.uk (58% off) - HotUKDeals
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Draper 60792 Digital Multimeter With Backlight £8.84 with free delivery @Amazon.co.uk (58% off)

£8.84 @ Amazon
I think this is the lowest price I have seen for this multimeter so far. Rdwarr posted the same deal about two weeks ago but @£9.83 and it gone up to £12.xx when I wanted to get one. So I waited … Read More
deals2009 Avatar
6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
I think this is the lowest price I have seen for this multimeter so far.

Rdwarr posted the same deal about two weeks ago but @£9.83 and it gone up to £12.xx when I wanted to get one. So I waited and now it is the time to get one if you need to. Pretty good reviews from Amazon.co.uk and I know the accuracy is good as well based on their user manual.
Hope this will help someone :)

Product Description
This lightweight multimeter is ideal for general electrical and automotive use.

Features.
20 position rotary function and range finder
Recessed input terminals for added safety
Measures A.C./D.C. voltage D.C.amps, resistance, diode measurment, transistor and HFE measurments.
10 amp fuse protection
Audible continuity buzzer.
Integral stand for easy visibility.
Supplied with test leads, battery and instruction manual.
Back light function.

The comprehensive instructions make this Multimeter easy to use and read.
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6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
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Comments/page:
#1
Hot from me.

It's about £3 or £4 cheaper than anywhere else without even taking into account postage.

Very handy to keep around the house for basic checks.
#2
nice but how do you use it exactly!
#3
ordered one for myself.
#5
Thanks, good deal.
1 Like #6
splatsplatsplat
nice but how do you use it exactly!


Easy mate, just plug the prongs in the holes you need, (it is displayed on which holes to use) and then turn the dial to what you require to test, e.g. power, current, voltage, continuity. On the dial it also splits the measurement into sub-sections, these will be like 10v, 20v, 50v, 100v, 200v, 500v/ You select the one above the voltage (etc) that you want to measure. So mains would be 500v, although the 200v my work, variable upon tolerance

Easy :D
#7
One of the main reasons I need the multimeter now is to test the AA/AAA battery charger and quite a large amount of AA,AAA rechargeable batteries I recently ordered. I want to know the difference when they are fully charged and when they are being used so that I can group them to make sure they always being drained equally. I can also measure how good they keep their charge during different time periods.
I also wants to measure my laptops, lcd screen, etc their actual power. I guess there will be some difficulty in measuring the currents when they are being used, not as straight as measuring their voltage. (P=U*I for DC).
Any suggestions for measuring their currents in any easy way? Or other easy way to get their actual power?
Thanks in advance.
#8
You can measure battery voltage but it isn't an accurate measure of it's remaining capacity. Likewise if you want to measure the current of something then you need to connect the multimeter in series with the consumer and it's supply.

If you want to know what the things around your house are using then an energy meter would be better. British Gas and others were doing these free before, maybe they still are.

Not sure what your formula above is but in simplistic terms power(watts) is IV, current x voltage.

This is an explanation of current measurement with a DMM - http://www.electronics-radio.com/articles/test-methods/meters/how-to-measure-current.php
#9
You can buy the same ones of a certain bay for £5
#10
it has a stand which is a plus :) when its lying down its hard to see the read out especially if your busy trying to making sure the 2 leads are making contact.
#11
muzzzzzzzzzy
You can buy the same ones of a certain bay for £5


same model? the cheapest I can find is £11.50 plus Delivery
#12
muzzzzzzzzzy
You can buy the same ones of a certain bay for £5

I dont think so ... stop snortin shake n vac.
#13
Good find. I keep a few of these. One in the house, one in the garage. But mine are the cheap ones from Dealextreme.
#14
I should have waited a week! Good spot.
#15
Shockingly good price. :)
#16
deals2009
I also wants to measure my laptops, lcd screen, etc their actual power. I guess there will be some difficulty in measuring the currents when they are being used, not as straight as measuring their voltage. (P=U*I for DC).
Any suggestions for measuring their currents in any easy way? Or other easy way to get their actual power?
Thanks in advance.

You'd be better off with a Kill A Watt type device like this http://www.reuk.co.uk/buy-KILL-A-WATT.htm (may be available cheaper elsewhere, I didn't look). Laptops will take different amounts of power depending on what they're doing (hard drive access, processor load etc.) so with one of these you can see the instantaneous power consumption or leave it to average over a period of time. (Remove the battery and power it from mains to do this otherwise your results will be unreliable as the battery might be charging)

Edited By: potfish on Aug 10, 2010 18:00: clarification
#17
Mawby
splatsplatsplat
nice but how do you use it exactly!


Easy mate, .....power, current, voltage, continuity.


All those words mean the same thing in my brain!

I would like to modify my electric windows in my van so that they work when the ignitions off. So what I want to do is put constant power from the loom to the switch instead of ignition power. all i need to do is find a live wire when the ignitions off, then splice from that to the switch. but what settings should i have this on to be using it with car power/voltage/wattage thingymabob?
#18
Thanks, going to order one for myself.
#19
splatsplatsplat
[quote=Mawby]
All those words mean the same thing in my brain!

I would like to modify my electric windows in my van so that they work when the ignitions off. So what I want to do is put constant power from the loom to the switch instead of ignition power. all i need to do is find a live wire when the ignitions off, then splice from that to the switch. but what settings should i have this on to be using it with car power/voltage/wattage thingymabob?


Voltage or low voltage, you should meaure about 12 volts when you are connected to the right wire. You don't really just want to splice into any live wire. A windows winders draws quite a bit of current (power) so a narrow wire may overheat and cause a fire if a fuse doesn't blow. Not the sort of thing you should be doing unless you really understand.
#20


Terrible book to recommend for a beginner.
#21
Damn, tried to order, price down to £6.99, out of stock! :(
#22
£12.41 from marketplace supplier now... :-(
#23
Thanks Stu, the U*I means the same as you guess, current *voltage.
Just to confirm, is that right to get the power by the measured current multiple measured voltage, which means measured current * 220v? There should be something missing as the it is AC, not DC.
#24
tsimehC


Terrible book to recommend for a beginner.
What would you suggest as an alternative tsimehC?
#25
Mawby
splatsplatsplat
nice but how do you use it exactly!


Easy mate, just plug the prongs in the holes you need, (it is displayed on which holes to use) and then turn the dial to what you require to test, e.g. power, current, voltage, continuity. On the dial it also splits the measurement into sub-sections, these will be like 10v, 20v, 50v, 100v, 200v, 500v/ You select the one above the voltage (etc) that you want to measure. So mains would be 500v, although the 200v my work, variable upon tolerance

Easy :D


Potential Fizz BANG! POP! If you do the above, please do not if you value your new multimeter!!! Never plug into mains, then turn the selector dial on a multimeter. Far better to set the dial 1st unconnected, then connect the prongs to the voltage to be measured. Doing it the other way round can have terrible consequences.
#26
Oops just realised when you say Mawby plug the prongs in the holes (you mean on the meter), then turn the dial.. My apologies mate!
#27
darn too late :(
#28
Was a good price :(
#29
deals2009
Thanks Stu, the U*I means the same as you guess, current *voltage.
Just to confirm, is that right to get the power by the measured current multiple measured voltage, which means measured current * 220v? There should be something missing as the it is AC, not DC.


Lets take an example, a transformed power supply to an LCD computer monitor.

The transformer will take a supply of 240v AC (RMS) from the ringmain in your house, this will then pass through a transformer which will output something like 18v DC.

To measure the Power (Watts) being used by the Transformer you would need to measure the Current (I) and the Voltage (V) being drawn by the transformer itself and then apply the formula P = IV.

Likewise to measure the Power the display uses you would need to carry out the same measurements but on the output side of the transformer.

These two measurements will likely not be equal as there will be losses in the transformer.

Does that help??
#30
Thanks Stu, I get what you mean when measuring before and after the transformer.

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