Duracell 12v 175w Sinewave Twin UK Socket Power Inverter With 2 X 2.4A USB Ports £23.75 Delivered 7dayshop - HotUKDeals
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Duracell 12v 175w Sinewave Twin UK Socket Power Inverter With 2 X 2.4A USB Ports £23.75 Delivered 7dayshop

£23.75 @ 7dayShop
Product Features Converts a DC supply to mains voltage, Perfect for Boats, Caravans, Motorhomes etc, Dual AC 3 pin sockets allow you to power laptops DVD Players etc Dual USB ports output 2.4A 5V per… Read More
belfastgeoff Avatar
11m, 2w agoFound 11 months, 2 weeks ago
Product Features

Converts a DC supply to mains voltage, Perfect for Boats, Caravans, Motorhomes etc, Dual AC 3 pin sockets allow you to power laptops DVD Players etc
Dual USB ports output 2.4A 5V perfect for digital devices such as tablet PC's including iPads, iPhones, Blackberry, Kindle etc.
Features shutdown protection, which powers down the inverter if battery power drops below a certain level.
Charges AC and USB devices simultaneously, LED Indicators, Quiet fan for efficient cooling
1m Power Cord, Dimensions: 220mm x 84mm x 51mm
7dayshop Online Since Year 2000. This product is supplied with our 7dayshop 30 Day Money Back 101% Complete Satisfaction Assurance.
Full Description

This Duracell 12V* 175W portable power inverter with AC and USB ports is great for delivering power while travelling. The USB ports output 2.4A 5V perfect for digital devices such as tablet PC's including iPads, iPhones, Blackberry, Kindle etc. The mains sockets remain available to power additional items such as a laptop or DVD player. The inverter includes shutdown protection, which powers down the inverter if battery power drops below a certain level.
*12V only. Please note this is not compatible with 24V DC
More From 7dayShop:
belfastgeoff Avatar
11m, 2w agoFound 11 months, 2 weeks ago
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(33) Jump to unreadPost a comment
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1 Like #1
I doubt this will be a true sinewave at that price
9 Likes #2
gazdoubleu
I doubt this will be a true sinewave at that price
Cos?
#3
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
2 Likes #4
gazdoubleu
I doubt this will be a true sinewave at that price

It's modified sinewave
http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/duracell-12v-modified-sinewave-175w-inverter-a19uq

What is the difference between pure sinewave and modified sinewave?
All household mains sockets output sinewave from the source to whatever is plugged in. Pure sinewave offers a smooth alternation in current. This product is a modified sinewave inverter, which produces a stepped alternation – which is easier and cheaper to produce.
A modified sinewave inverter can power devices such as laptops, printers and chargers, although some items may pick up interference from the inverter
2 Likes #5
Also, things like laptop chargers can buzz in a 'concerning' manner.

This isn't a great deal for a 175w inverter.

For instance, I've got one of these and find it works fine:

Plenty of cars have a 15w fuse for their lighter socket I believe.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Portable-Inverter-Adapter-Cigarette-MRI2013KLB-KFST/dp/B0111YIFK0
#6
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.


Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
2 Likes #7
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.

Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
#8
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
1 Like #10
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
#11
And that is useful for? The voltage is fixed (roughly, e.g. 5V, probably plus/minus 0.1V for USB), we are talking maximum current/wattage, so the resistance is irrelevant (not that many would know the resistance of their phone). The only useful fact is P = VI (wattage = voltage times current). Are you disagreeing with my calculations (i.e an approximate 90% efficiency at best)?
#12
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
Say`s it is 12V* 175W ,so watt (175) divided by volt (12) is just less than 15amp.
so convert to 240v, 240/12x15=300 so getting about less than 300w at 240v !!!!!!!!!!
#13
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
#14
AndyRoyd
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
is waste used in covert hence `heat` and volt drop !!!
#15
3 year warranty too according to Duracell 8)
#16
geekonthepc
3 year warranty too according to Duracell 8)
do seem a good deal. pay more for a good transformer
#17
belfastgeoff
AndyRoyd
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
is waste used in covert hence `heat` and volt drop !!!
Not sure what your comment means, but the inverter is said to be 90% efficient. The 10% (in)efficiency will be primarily lost as heat, there should be no voltage output drop provided the input supply remains within parameters. Consider the item is self-regulating as it shuts down if it senses the input source voltage is stressed.
#18
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
Say`s it is 12V* 175W ,so watt (175) divided by volt (12) is just less than 15amp.
so convert to 240v, 240/12x15=300 so getting about less than 300w at 240v !!!!!!!!!!
Lost me there. On the first line, yes, you are correct, but only useful in context (available input current from the car) if you assume 100% efficiency (which means you know little about electronics/physics) - a 175W total output (which is not what the title states - the full 175W is not inverted & it certainly isn't sinewave, bit like abbreviating synthetic chamois to just chamois) will need at least 190W input, i.e over 15A. I would be surprised if the unit can manage 90% efficiency considering that it has 2 circuits (DC-AC & DC-DC) & also a fan.

Your second line is hilarious - a converter that can take in 175W & output 300W would be worth its weight in di-lithium crystals (i.e. only exists on the Enterprise). The formula that would make sense is 15 (Amps) * 12/240 (voltage ratio) = 0.75A, which can be confirmed as sensible by 0.75 (Amps) * 240 (Volts) = 180 (Watts).

Title should read 12VDC 175W USB & AC power supply: 150W peak modified sinewave AC and 2 * 2.4A USB.
#19
AndyRoyd
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
Yes, even looking on the net, we are left to assume what the vague specs mean. Was hoping for some questions on Amazon, but alas none - often where users provide the info the vendors fail to provide.

Where the example uses are 'laptops' & laptop PSUs can be 100W+ each, can see some fuses being blown by these. The three year warranty is good, but with 7dayshop I think you would have to return to Jersey/Guernsey, which I have no experience of & whether they would follow UK consumer law (i.e. refund postage costs) would be interesting.
#20
jnm21
AndyRoyd
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
Yes, even looking on the net, we are left to assume what the vague specs mean. Was hoping for some questions on Amazon, but alas none - often where users provide the info the vendors fail to provide.
Where the example uses are 'laptops' & laptop PSUs can be 100W+ each, can see some fuses being blown by these. The three year warranty is good, but with 7dayshop I think you would have to return to Jersey/Guernsey, which I have no experience of & whether they would follow UK consumer law (i.e. refund postage costs) would be interesting.
A 100W switch-mode laptop charger shound have an efficiency of no less than 80%, in which case it would consume no more than 125W from the inverter and no more than 138W (say 11.5A) from the car supply.
I suspect a 3 year warranty would be serviced by the manufacturer, but I have no knowledge about if or how Duracell would implement this.
1 Like #21
jnm21
The three year warranty is good, but with 7dayshop I think you would have to return to Jersey/Guernsey, which I have no experience of & whether they would follow UK consumer law (i.e. refund postage costs) would be interesting.
Same 150W mains rating at less of a cash risk at £6.99 delivered http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/331552908252
Other risks debatable.
#22
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
Say`s it is 12V* 175W ,so watt (175) divided by volt (12) is just less than 15amp.
so convert to 240v, 240/12x15=300 so getting about less than 300w at 240v !!!!!!!!!!
Lost me there. On the first line, yes, you are correct, but only useful in context (available input current from the car) if you assume 100% efficiency (which means you know little about electronics/physics) - a 175W total output (which is not what the title states - the full 175W is not inverted & it certainly isn't sinewave, bit like abbreviating synthetic chamois to just chamois) will need at least 190W input, i.e over 15A. I would be surprised if the unit can manage 90% efficiency considering that it has 2 circuits (DC-AC & DC-DC) & also a fan.
Your second line is hilarious - a converter that can take in 175W & output 300W would be worth its weight in di-lithium crystals (i.e. only exists on the Enterprise). The formula that would make sense is 15 (Amps) * 12/240 (voltage ratio) = 0.75A, which can be confirmed as sensible by 0.75 (Amps) * 240 (Volts) = 180 (Watts).
Title should read 12VDC 175W USB & AC power supply: 150W peak modified sinewave AC and 2 * 2.4A USB.
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-ohmslaw.htm
#23
AndyRoyd
jnm21
AndyRoyd
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Purely observational: rated power is quoted as 150W, with peak power quoted as 175W. I would assume correctly or incorrectly that the 175W rating is the total max power available simultaneously from all three available outputs (150W + 12W +12W plus change). The item is said to be 90% efficient, so to provide a maximum of 175W usable power will require a supply of circa 195W.
195W at 12V = 16.25A; 195W at 14V = 13.9A.
Yes, even looking on the net, we are left to assume what the vague specs mean. Was hoping for some questions on Amazon, but alas none - often where users provide the info the vendors fail to provide.
Where the example uses are 'laptops' & laptop PSUs can be 100W+ each, can see some fuses being blown by these. The three year warranty is good, but with 7dayshop I think you would have to return to Jersey/Guernsey, which I have no experience of & whether they would follow UK consumer law (i.e. refund postage costs) would be interesting.
A 100W switch-mode laptop charger shound have an efficiency of no less than 80%, in which case it would consume no more than 125W from the inverter and no more than 138W (say 11.5A) from the car supply.
I suspect a 3 year warranty would be serviced by the manufacturer, but I have no knowledge about if or how Duracell would implement this.
Yes, over 100w & it has 2 AC sockets => well over 150W.

Also legally contract is with retailer - yes manufacturer should honour it, but legally it is the retailer who must, covering all costs.

Edited By: jnm21 on Aug 04, 2016 15:15
#24
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
Say`s it is 12V* 175W ,so watt (175) divided by volt (12) is just less than 15amp.
so convert to 240v, 240/12x15=300 so getting about less than 300w at 240v !!!!!!!!!!
Lost me there. On the first line, yes, you are correct, but only useful in context (available input current from the car) if you assume 100% efficiency (which means you know little about electronics/physics) - a 175W total output (which is not what the title states - the full 175W is not inverted & it certainly isn't sinewave, bit like abbreviating synthetic chamois to just chamois) will need at least 190W input, i.e over 15A. I would be surprised if the unit can manage 90% efficiency considering that it has 2 circuits (DC-AC & DC-DC) & also a fan.
Your second line is hilarious - a converter that can take in 175W & output 300W would be worth its weight in di-lithium crystals (i.e. only exists on the Enterprise). The formula that would make sense is 15 (Amps) * 12/240 (voltage ratio) = 0.75A, which can be confirmed as sensible by 0.75 (Amps) * 240 (Volts) = 180 (Watts).
Title should read 12VDC 175W USB & AC power supply: 150W peak modified sinewave AC and 2 * 2.4A USB.
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-ohmslaw.htm
That's twice you have posted that link - go on third time lucky - someone may spot the relevance.
1 Like #25
Could this be used to boil an electric kettle without blowing a fuse?
2 Likes #26
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
belfastgeoff
jnm21
FlyerUK
couragenh
car sockets maximum power output is usually 125w.
Most car utility sockets are fused at 15A, so can deliver a max of 180W at 12V.
Which this must be way over - 175W AC output + 24W DC output must need around 220W input, probably 250W.
Most of the uses are silly - converting DC to sort of AC to then power a AC to DC converter - bit like buying dollars to take to continental Europe & change into Euros.
are you an electrician
Nope, why?
Say`s it is 12V* 175W ,so watt (175) divided by volt (12) is just less than 15amp.
so convert to 240v, 240/12x15=300 so getting about less than 300w at 240v !!!!!!!!!!
Lost me there. On the first line, yes, you are correct, but only useful in context (available input current from the car) if you assume 100% efficiency (which means you know little about electronics/physics) - a 175W total output (which is not what the title states - the full 175W is not inverted & it certainly isn't sinewave, bit like abbreviating synthetic chamois to just chamois) will need at least 190W input, i.e over 15A. I would be surprised if the unit can manage 90% efficiency considering that it has 2 circuits (DC-AC & DC-DC) & also a fan.
Your second line is hilarious - a converter that can take in 175W & output 300W would be worth its weight in di-lithium crystals (i.e. only exists on the Enterprise). The formula that would make sense is 15 (Amps) * 12/240 (voltage ratio) = 0.75A, which can be confirmed as sensible by 0.75 (Amps) * 240 (Volts) = 180 (Watts).
Title should read 12VDC 175W USB & AC power supply: 150W peak modified sinewave AC and 2 * 2.4A USB.
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-ohmslaw.htm

That's... not that helpful. We've got the basics of electricity down (hence we can convert 15A at 12V into 180W).

But yeah, efficiency and maximum current is the problem. Wikipedia says 10A is a usual maximum current for the fuses in a cigarette lighter socket, so 120W at 12V. Let's say you draw all that capacity and have 90% efficiency, that's 108W maximum output, then say your laptop power supply is 80% efficient, that's 86W at 19V or whatever your laptop runs at.

There's really not that much capacity, it's probably enough for one 90W laptop but that's it.
#27
looks really useful
1 Like #28
Iconcur
Could this be used to boil an electric kettle without blowing a fuse?
No. Look at the wattage of a kettle - even the small hotel ones are about 700W. Buy a 12V element that has a cigarette lighter plug and can be dipped into a mug. It might heat the mug in 20 minutes if you're lucky.
#29
pibpob
Iconcur
Could this be used to boil an electric kettle without blowing a fuse?
No. Look at the wattage of a kettle - even the small hotel ones are about 700W. Buy a 12V element that has a cigarette lighter plug and can be dipped into a mug. It might heat the mug in 20 minutes if you're lucky.
Yea tryed one of them actually heats a cup in about 60 seconds but blows the fuse
1 Like #30
Iconcur
pibpob
Iconcur
Could this be used to boil an electric kettle without blowing a fuse?
No. Look at the wattage of a kettle - even the small hotel ones are about 700W. Buy a 12V element that has a cigarette lighter plug and can be dipped into a mug. It might heat the mug in 20 minutes if you're lucky.
Yea tryed one of them actually heats a cup in about 60 seconds but blows the fuse
To boil a mug (250ml) of water in 60 seconds would be over a kilowatt.
1 Like #31
aztech
gazdoubleu
I doubt this will be a true sinewave at that price
Cos?


Cos? a lettuce of a variety with crisp narrow leaves that form a tall head. Or did you mean Kos, an Island in the Aegean sea?
#32
so many engineers over a sudden, LOL.
#33
this is like a DW contest, zzzzzzz

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